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In The Lyon Terence Giulia Torello-Hill and Andrew J. Turner take an unprecedented interdisciplinary approach to map out the influence of Late-Antique and Medieval commentary and iconographic traditions over this seminal edition of the plays of Terence, published in Lyon in 1493, and examine its legacy. The work had a profound impact on the way Terence’s plays were read and understood throughout the sixteenth century, but its influence has been poorly recognised in modern scholarship. The authors establish the pivotal role that this book, and its editor Badius, played in the revitalisation of the theoretical understanding of Classical comedy and in the revival of the plays of Terence that foreshadowed the establishment of early modern theatre in Italy and France.
L’affirmation de soi chez les historiens, de l’Antiquité à la fin du Moyen Age
Author: Cristian Bratu
In L’affirmation de soi chez les historiens, Cristian Bratu discusses authorial self-representations and self-promotion strategies in the works of ancient and medieval historians, from Herodotus (5th c. BC) to Philippe de Commynes (15th c. AD). After describing the emergence of an author figure in the works of ancient Greek and Roman historians, Bratu shows that, in spite of the emphasis placed by the nascent Christian civilization on humility, medieval historians were anything but self-effacing. Subsequently, he focuses on the authorial figures of French medieval historians who wrote in the vernacular between the 12th and 15th centuries. Bratu uses a variety of approaches (philology, codicology, narratology) in order to shed new light on the authorial figures of ancient and medieval historians.

Dans L’affirmation de soi chez les historiens, Cristian Bratu étudie la figure de l’auteur dans les œuvres des historiens antiques et médiévaux, d’Hérodote (Ve siècle av. J.-C.) à Philippe de Commynes (XVe siècle ap. J.-C.). Après une section dédiée à l’émergence d’une figure d’auteur chez les historiens de l’Antiquité gréco-romaine, Bratu montre que malgré l’importance accordée à l’humilité dans la civilisation chrétienne naissante, les historiens médiévaux furent tout sauf modestes. Cette étude se concentre ensuite sur les figures des historiens de langue française entre le XIIe et le XVe siècle. En s’appuyant sur différentes méthodes (philologie, codicologie, narratologie), Cristian Bratu apporte un éclairage nouveau sur la figure de l’auteur chez les historiens antiques et médiévaux.
James Joyce and Genetic Criticism presents contemporary scholarship in genetic criticism and Joyce studies. In considering how evolutionary themes enhance the definition of the genetic method in interpreting texts, this volume presents a variety of manuscript-based analyses that engage how textual meaning, through addition and omission, grows. In doing so, this volume covers a wide-range of topics concerning Joycean genetics, some of which include Joyce’s editorial practice, the forthcoming revised edition of Finnegans Wake, the genetic relationship between Giacomo Joyce and Ulysses, the method and approach required for creating an online archive of Finnegans Wake, and the extensive genesis of “Penelope”.

Contributors are: Shinjini Chattopadhyay, Tim Conley, Luca Crispi, Robbert-Jan Henkes, Sangam MacDuff, Genevieve Sartor, Fritz Senn, Sam Slote, Dirk Van Hulle.
Travelling Chronicles presents fourteen episodes in the history of news, written by some of the leading scholars in the rapidly developing fields of news and newspaper studies. Ranging across eastern and western Europe and beyond, the chapters look back to the early modern period and into the eighteenth century to consider how the news of the past was gathered and spread, how news outlets gained respect and influence, how news functioned as a business, and also how the historiography of news can be conducted with the resources available to scholars today. Travelling Chronicles offers a timely analysis of early news, at a moment when historical newspaper archives are being widely digitalised and as the truth value of news in our own time undergoes intense scrutiny.
The Iberian Book World in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century
Within just a generation or two of its arrival, print had become a ubiquitous and spirited part of Spain and Portugal’s urban cultures. It serviced an ever-expanding reading public, as well as many and varied practical quotidian needs. Its impact on society was multi-dimensional and complex, and its social reach far broader than the civic or ecclesiastical elites were ever to be entirely comfortable with.
This cross-disciplinary volume of essays focuses on the maturing marketplace for print in the first half of the seventeenth century, shedding new light on some important transformations, with authors and publishers seizing opportunities available to them – negotiating the regulatory efforts of the censors, and scrambling to reconfigure their relationship with their readers.
The Catalogue of the Arabic, Persian and Turkish Manuscripts in Belgium is a union catalogue aiming is to present the Oriental manuscripts held by various Belgian public institutions (Royal Library, university and public libraries). These collections and their contents are largely unknown to scholars due to the lack of published catalogues. This first volume, consisting of a bi-lingual (English and Arabic) handlist, concerns the collection of the Université de Liège, which holds the largest number of Oriental manuscripts (c. 500). Each title is briefly described, identifying the author and offering basic material information. Most of the manuscripts described in this handlist originate from North Africa.
Author: Efraim Wust
The Yahuda Collection was bequeathed to the National Library of Israel by one of the twentieth century's most knowledgeable and important collectors, Abraham Shalom Yahuda (d. 1951). The rich and multifaceted collection of 1,186 manuscripts, spanning ten centuries, includes works representing the major Islamic disciplines and literary traditions. Highlights include illuminated manuscripts from Mamluk, Mughal, and Ottoman court libraries; rare, early copies of medieval scholarly treatises; and early modern autograph copies.

In this groundbreaking Arabic catalogue, Efraim Wust synthesizes the Islamic and Western manuscript traditions to enrich our understanding of the manuscripts and their compositions. His combined treatment of Arabic, Persian, and Turkish manuscripts preserves the integrity of the collection and honors the multicultural history of the Islamic intellectual tradition.
Editors: Joad Raymond and Noah Moxham
News Networks in Early Modern Europe attempts to redraw the history of European news communication in the 16th and 17th centuries. News is defined partly by movement and circulation, yet histories of news have been written overwhelmingly within national contexts. This volume of essays explores the notion that early modern European news, in all its manifestations – manuscript, print, and oral – is fundamentally transnational.
These 37 essays investigate the language, infrastructure, and circulation of news across Europe. They range from the 15th to the 18th centuries, and from the Ottoman Empire to the Americas, focussing on the mechanisms of transmission, the organisation of networks, the spread of forms and modes of news communication, and the effects of their translation into new locales and languages.
International Exchange in the Early Modern Book World presents new research on several aspects of the movement and exchange of books between countries, languages and confessions. It considers elements of the international book trade, the circulation and collection of texts, the practice of translation and the diffusion and exchange of technical and cultural knowledge. Commercial and logistical aspects of the early modern book trade are considered, as are the relationships between local markets and the internationally-minded firms which sought to meet their expectations. The barriers to the movement of books across borders – political, linguistic, confessional, cultural – are explored, as are the means by which these barriers were surmounted.