Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 96 items for :

  • Criticism & Theory x
  • Encyclopedia x
  • Book History x
  • History of the Book x
Clear All

Series:

Edited by Genevieve Sartor

James Joyce and Genetic Criticism presents contemporary scholarship in genetic criticism and Joyce studies. In considering how evolutionary themes enhance the definition of the genetic method in interpreting texts, this volume presents a variety of manuscript-based analyses that engage how textual meaning, through addition and omission, grows. In doing so, this volume covers a wide-range of topics concerning Joycean genetics, some of which include Joyce’s editorial practice, the forthcoming revised edition of Finnegans Wake, the genetic relationship between Giacomo Joyce and Ulysses, the method and approach required for creating an online archive of Finnegans Wake, and the extensive genesis of “Penelope”.

Contributors are: Shinjini Chattopadhyay, Tim Conley, Luca Crispi, Robbert-Jan Henkes, Sangam MacDuff, Genevieve Sartor, Fritz Senn, Sam Slote, Dirk Van Hulle.

Series:

Robbert-Jan Henkes

Abstract

Joyce was not a professional proofreader. In his sixteen years of composing Finnegans Wake, many errors of transcription crept in—and stayed in. Despite efforts to repair the text (e.g. in the Rose and O’Hanlon edition), close inspection of Joyce’s writing habits—“revise-and-complete”—reveals that he was not always averse to adopt transcription errors, which can be shown by his adapting them in subsequent stages. There is a case to be made for silent approval of mistakes made by typists and typesetters, which makes the task of editing a corrected Finnegans Wake all the more daunting.

Series:

Sam Slote

Abstract

The first editor of Ulysses was James Joyce. As he was overseeing typescripts and proofs, Joyce had to correct errors and misprisions inflicted upon his text, some of which he had himself made. Of course, this editorial work was (mostly) subsumed within Joyce’s authorial role as he expanded and revised his text towards publication. Indeed, the character of the editorial emendations that Joyce made evolves over the course of Ulysses’s composition, thereby reflecting his own changing conceptions of his book.

Series:

Dirk Van Hulle

Abstract

This article suggests a reversal of roles: instead of using manuscript research to make an edition, it conceives of an edition as a tool for doing manuscript research. The case study is Joyce’s red-backed, “Guiltless” copybook, more specifically the genesis of the phrase “genesic field” in Chapter I.5 of Finnegans Wake. After a short survey of the history of editorial approaches, the article proposes a way of modelling a digital genetic edition of “Work in Progress” according to five categories (exo-, endo-, epi-, macro- and microgenesis), thus taking up Daniel Ferrer’s suggestion to devise “models for a genetic criticism” in the digital age.

Series:

Luca Crispi

Abstract

This article examines how Joyce constantly added to the text and altered the presentation of “Penelope.” While a newly discovered draft indicates that Joyce may have settled on some of the episode’s most familiar stylistic features as early as 1916, later manuscripts document that the episode’s other formal aspects—its precise eightfold structure and the almost complete absence of standard punctuation—were some of the last stylistic innovations he conceived for the novel. Furthermore, we see how he only implemented these late aesthetic strategies slowly and haphazardly on various stages of the episode’s proofs just before Ulysses was published.

Series:

Shinjini Chattopadhyay

Abstract

The position of Giacomo Joyce in the genetic dossier of Ulysses is ambivalent because it cannot be accurately tagged as notes, draft, or fair copy. It is uncertain whether the text existed only to be later assimilated in the larger works of Joyce; or whether it was supposed to be an autonomous literary creation. The article focuses on a specific instance of text duplication between Giacomo Joyce and “Oxen of the Sun” and attempts to determine whether or not Giacomo Joyce is an avant-texte or an intertext to Ulysses or whether it occupies an indefinite position between the two categories.

Series:

Sangam MacDuff

Abstract

This article offers a close examination of one of Joyce’s earliest manuscripts, a handwritten copy of the “The Apocalypse of Saint John.” Comparing Joyce’s autograph with the Authorised Version he owned, I argue that Joyce’s changes, corrections and markings imply an interest in the literal meaning, interpretation and style of Revelation. Building on these premises, I consider Joyce’s use of Revelation in his subsequent works, analysing the genesis of passages alluding to Apocalypse through the notebooks, drafts and typescripts of Portrait, Ulysses and Finnegans Wake.

Series:

Tim Conley

Abstract

While Joyce has been repeatedly recognised as an exemplary case study for genetic criticism, he also presents an array of problems and cautions for such endeavours. Perhaps paramount among these is the way that Joyce’s complex methods of composition evolve: in the Wake years, the recursive switching between what might only provisionally be called “sources” and “notes” and “drafts” troubles not only the distinctness of these terms but the difference between processes of “revision” and “writing” as such. This article argues that Joyce highlights how “revision” is a sort of editorial fiction, the use of which needs to be carefully monitored.