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Edited by Jesús Benito Sánchez and Ana María Manzanas

The series locates itself within the field of comparative American studies, and focuses specifically on the analysis and criticism of the so-called “ethnic” American literatures. The orientation of the series is, explicitly, for the literary analysis to merge the political with the imaginative, and the culturally-specific with the cross-cultural. As an intercultural endeavor, the series assumes the inextricable link between standards of aesthetic value and power; aesthetic judgments are not made in an vacuum but are rather intimately connected with dominant cultural standards of value. In this sense, intercultural literary analysis should address issues of race, ethnicity, class and gender, while it focuses on literary topics, therefore occupying the interspace between the political and the aesthetic.

By ethnic American literature is understood the multiethnic literatures of the United States, with an emphasis on the comparative analysis of the different traditions (including African American literature, Asian American literature, Native American lit., Chicano and US latino literature, as well as other so called hyphenated or immigrant writers with non-US background like Indian writers, Arab American writers, European American writers, etc.). The series focus is mostly comparative, multiethnic, and intercultural, but would also love to feature analyses of single ethnic traditions.

The volumes in the series offer clear and comprehensive approaches to selected topics (such as magical realism, border theory, and others), covering the different implications of each topic to the development of ethnic American literatures. Volumes then proceed to comparative literary analyses of carefully selected works from each ethnic tradition.

Volumes should offer interrelated contributions. Each volume should consist of long articles, carefully designed to cover the whole field under study. Each article should offer a general, theoretical exploration of a particular topic, as well as argue a particular point.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Diaspora and Multiculturalism

Common Traditions and New Developments

Series:

Edited by Monika Fludernik

In postcolonial theory we have now reached a new stage in the succession of key concepts. After the celebrations of hybridity in the work of Homi Bhabha and Gayatri Spivak, it is now the concept of diaspora that has sparked animated debates among postcolonial critics. This collection intervenes in the current discussion about the 'new' diaspora by placing the rise of diaspora within the politics of multiculturalism and its supercession by a politics of difference and cultural-rights theory. The essays present recent developments in Jewish negotiations of diasporic tradition and experience, discussing the reinterpretation of concepts of the 'old' diaspora in late twentieth- century British and American Jewish literature. The second part of the volume comprises theoretical and critical essays on the South Asian diaspora and on multicultural settings between Australia, Africa, the Caribbean and North America. The South Asian and Caribbean diasporas are compared to the Jewish prototype and contrasted with the Turkish diaspora in Germany. All essays deal with literary reflections on, and thematizations of, the diasporic predicament.