Browse results

Fragments in Words and Music
Volume Editors: Walter Bernhart and Axel Englund
Incompletion is an essential condition of cultural history, and particularly the idea of the fragment became a central element of Romantic art. Through its resistance to classicist ideals it continued being of high relevance to the various strands of modernist and contemporary aesthetics. The fourteen essays in this volume, based on the 2017 Stockholm conference of the International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA), for the first time address incompletion in a wide range of literary and musical texts, from Baudelaire and Flaubert through Tolstoy and Henry James to Bachmann, Jelinek and Janet Frame, from Nietzsche and Chopin through Russolo and Puccini to Rihm and Kurtàg. Two further essays deal with topical general issues in the field of word and music studies.
Beckett’s Voices / Voicing Beckett uses ‘voice’ as a prism to investigate Samuel Beckett’s work across a range of texts, genres, and performance cultures. Twenty-one contributors, all members of the Samuel Beckett Working Group of the International Federation for Theatre Research, discuss the musicality of Beckett’s voices, the voice as ‘absent other’, the voices of the vulnerable, the cinematic voice, and enacted voices in performance and media. The volume engages not only with Beckett’s history and legacy, but also with many of the central theoretical issues in theatre studies as a whole. Featuring testimonies from Beckett practitioners as well as emerging and established scholars, it is emblematic of the thriving and diverse community that is twenty-first century Beckett Studies.

Contributors: Svetlana Antropova, Linda Ben-Zvi, Jonathan Bignell, Llewellyn Brown, Julie Campbell, Thirthankar Chakraborty, Laurens De Vos, Everett C. Frost, S. E. Gontarski, Mariko Hori Tanaka, Nicholas E. Johnson, Kumiko Kiuchi, Anna McMullan, Melissa Nolan, Cathal Quinn, Arthur Rose, Teresa Rosell Nicolás, Jürgen Siess, Anna Sigg, Yoshiko Takebe, Michiko Tsushima
Volume Editors: Sandra Dinter and Johanna Marquardt
Often thought of as a thing of the past, nationalism remains surprisingly resilient in the postcolonial era, especially since the concepts of multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism have lost authority in recent years. The contributions assembled in Nationalism and the Postcolonial examine various forms, representations, and consequences of past and present nationalisms in languages, popular culture, and literature in or associated with Australia, Canada, England, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Nigeria, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago Bringing together perspectives from linguistics, political science, cultural studies, and literary studies, the collection illustrates how postcolonial nationalism functions as a unifying mechanism of anti-colonial nation-building as well as a divisive force that can encourage discrimination and violence.

Contributors: Natascha Bing, Prachi Gupta, Ralf Haekel, Kathrin Härtl, Idreas Khandy, Theresa Krampe, Lukas Lammers, Arhea Marshall, Hannah Pardey, Sina Schuhmaier, Hanna Teichler, Michael Westphal
El discurso interior en las novelas de Javier Marías: los ojos de la mente ofrece una perspectiva novedosa del universo narrativo de uno de los autores contemporáneos más destacados de España. Con el fin de ahondar en el origen y significado de los modos del discurso interior (psiconarración, monólogo o fluir de conciencia) en sus ficciones, este libro presenta una interpretación crítica de todas sus novelas, desde El siglo (1983) hasta Berta Isla (2017).

El discurso interior en las novelas de Javier Marías: los ojos de la mente offers a fresh perspective on the narrative universe of one of Spain’s most distinguished contemporary authors. In order to delve into the origin and meaning of inner speech modes (psychonarration, monologue or stream of consciousness) in his fictions, this book presents a critic interpretation of all his novels, from El siglo (1983) to Berta Isla (2017).
Volume Editors: Jürgen Barkhoff and Joep Leerssen
The articulation of collective identity by means of a stereotyped repertoire of exclusionary characterizations of Self and Other is one of the longest-standing literary traditions in Europe and as such has become part of a global modernity. Recently, this discourse of Othering and national stereotyping has gained fresh political virulence as a result of the rise of “Identity Politics”. What is more, this newly politicized self/other discourse has affected Europe itself as that continent has been weathering a series of economic and political crises in recent years. The present volume traces the conjunction between cultural and literary traditions and contemporary ideologies during the crisis of European multilateralism.

Contributors: Aelita Ambrulevičiūtė, Jürgen Barkhoff, Stefan Berger, Zrinka Blažević, Daniel Carey, Ana María Fraile, Wulf Kansteiner, Joep Leerssen, Hercules Millas, Zenonas Norkus, Aidan O’Malley, Raúl Sánchez Prieto, Karel Šima, Luc Van Doorslaer,Ruth Wodak
Author: Rafael Bernabe
Walt Whitman and His Caribbean Interlocutors: José Martí, C.L.R. James, and Pedro Mir explores the writings of Whitman (1819-1892) and of three Caribbean authors who engaged with them: the Cuban poet, essayist and revolutionary José Martí (1853-1895); the Trinidadian activist, historian and cultural critic C.L.R. James (1901-1989), and the Dominican poet Pedro Mir (1913-2000). Whitman and his Caribbean interlocutors are discussed against the background of the contradictions of capitalist modernity, as exemplified by the United States between the 1840s and the 1940s. Marx's exploration of the liberating and oppressive dimensions of capitalist expansion frames the discussion of each author and of Martí's, James's and Mir's responses to Whitman and, more generally, to North American capitalist and industrial civilisation and its imperial projections.
Transnational Perspectives, Translation Processes, Scandinavian and Postcolonial Challenges
Examining the cultural dynamics of translation and transfer, Cultural Transfer Reconsideredproposes new insights into both epistemological and analytical questions raised in the research area of cultural transfer. Seeking to emphasize the creative processes of transfer, Steen Bille Jørgensen and Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink have invited specialized researchers to determine the role of structures and agents in the dynamics of cultural encounters. With its particular focus on the North, as opposed to the South, the volume problematizes national paradigms. Presenting various aspects of tri- and multilateral transfers involving Scandinavian countries, Cultural Transfer Reconsidered opens perspectives regarding the ways in which textual, intertextual and artistic practices, in particular, pave the way for postcolonial interrelatedness.

Contributors: Miriam Lay Brander, Petra Broomans, Michel Espagne, Karin Hoff, Steen Bille Jørgensen, Anne-Estelle Leguy, Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink, Walter Moser, Magnus Qvistgaard, Anna Sandberg, Udo Schöning, Wiebke Röben de Alencar Xavier
Readings in Post/Colonial Literatures and Cultures in English
Active since 1990, Cross/Cultures covers the whole range of the colonial and post-colonial experience across the English-speaking world as well as the literatures and cultures of non-anglophone countries. The series accomodates both studies by single authors and edited critical collections.

The broad spectrum of Cross/Cultures can be illustrated by book topics as diverse as black South African autobiography, Kenyan settler writing, the African-Jamaican aesthetic, Australian and New Zealand poetry, Southeast Asian art after 1990, diasporic trauma in Caribbean writing and women’s fiction of the Sri Lankan diaspora. Cross/Cultures has also published monograph treatments of such writers as Chinua Achebe, J.M. Coetzee, Kate Grenville, Caryl Phillips, Raja Rao, Derek Walcott, and Patrick White.

Included in Cross/Cultures are collections of selected and revised papers from important conferences (ASNEL Papers = GAPS; ACLALS; EACLALS).
All book proposals and MSS undergo double blind peer review by experts in the field, after being admitted for consideration by the series editors, for whom open-mindedness and catholicity of interests are hallmark values as well as maintaining scholarly accuracy. All books are ushered through the production process with hands-on personal critical engagement—an approach that has helped make the series’ high international reputation.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Series Editor: Gernot Wimmer
This book series takes an interdisciplinary approach, examining the literature of modernity through consideration of its diverse phenomena and contexts.
While the Early Modern Era was marked in cultural-historical terms by the Renaissance, economically by the Industrial Revolution and politically by the French Revolution as well as nationalism, a first high point in modern literature was achieved by insights drawn from the natural and human sciences, foremost the fields of psychoanalysis, the quantum hypothesis, and the theory of relativity. A necessary condition for the interdisciplinary approach, therefore, in addition to the consideration of socio-cultural implications, is engagement with the history of thought, which makes the development of the Modern Era comprehensible.
This premise provides the basis for the examination of the numerous phenomena of modernity through the lens of literary texts, stemming from all applicable national literatures.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Expérimentation et sémentation au XXIe siècle
Author: Claire Olivier
Dans Les écritures de l'image par Jean-Philippe Toussaint Claire Olivier s’intéresse à la manière dont l’écrivain, cinéaste, photographe et plasticien Jean-Philippe Toussaint, expérimente la puissance des images pour composer en ce début du XXIe siècle une œuvre singulière fondée sur des relations transesthétiques. Elle s’attache à montrer que les écritures toussaintiennes, quel que soit le médium choisi, sont visuelles. Elles donnent à voir, à penser, à rêver et composent un « essai-image ». Ce dernier constitue une forme toujours en devenir qui s’appuie sur un processus de « sémentation », néologisme qui désigne une véritable alchimie du signe où le sens est continuellement réactivé par des contextualisations différentes. Sur le mode de l’opera operta, cet « essai-image » toussaintien déploie ses séductions réflexives comme romanesques.

In Les écritures de l'image par Jean-Philippe Toussaint, Claire Olivier is concerned with the way the writer, filmmaker, photographer and plastic artist Jean-Philippe Toussaint experiments with the power of images to create, in the 21st century, a singular work based on transaesthetic relationships. She endeavours to demonstrate that toussaintian writings are visual, independently from the chosen medium. They allow to see, think, dream and compose an “image-essay”. The latter forms a shape always in the making, relying on a “sémentation” process, neologism designating a true sign alchemy where the meaning is constantly revived through different contextualisations. On the model of the opera operta, this toussaintian “image-essay” deploys its reflective seductions as novelistic.