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Exchanges between Iberia and the British Isles, 1500–1767
In Exile, Diplomacy and Texts, Ana Sáez-Hidalgo and Berta Cano-Echevarría offer an interdisciplinary narrative of religious, political, and diplomatic exchanges between early modern Iberia and the British Isles during a period uniquely marked by inconstant alliances and corresponding antagonisms. Such conditions notwithstanding, the essays in this volume challenge conventionally monolithic views of confrontation, providing through fresh examination of exchanges of news, movements and interactions of people, transactions of books and texts, new evidence of trans-national and trans-cultural conversations between British and Irish communities in the Iberian Peninsula, and of Spanish and Portuguese ‘others’ travelling to Britain and Ireland.

Contributors include: Berta Cano-Echevarría, Rui Carvalho Homem, Mark Hutchings, , Thomas O’Connor, Susana Oliveira, Tamara Pérez-Fernández, Glyn Redworth, Marta Revilla-Rivas, and Ana Sáez-Hidalgo.
In the past years, reflections on Jewish literatures and theoretical and methodological approaches discussed in Comparative Literature have converged. Places and Forms of Encounter in Jewish Literatures. Transfer, Mediality and Situativity brings together close readings and contextualizations of Jewish literatures with theories discussed in Comparative and World Literature Studies. The contributions are arranged in five chapters capturing central processes, actors and dynamics in the making of literatures, namely Literary Agents, Literary Figures, Writing Voids, Making of Literatures and Perceiving and Creating Languages. The volume seeks to illuminate the interrelations between literary systems, and to highlight Jewish literatures as a prism for encounters on the levels of text, discourse and culture, and their transformative force.
The Literary Sinitic Context and the Birth of Modern Japanese Language and Literature
In Kanbunmyaku: The Literary Sinitic Context and the Birth of Modern Japanese Language and Literature, Saito Mareshi demonstrates the centrality of Literary Sinitic poetry and prose in the creation of modern literary Japanese. Saito’s new understanding of the role of “ kanbunmyaku” in the formation of Japanese literary modernity challenges dominant narratives tied to translations from modern Western literatures and problematizes the antagonism between Literary Sinitic and Japanese in the modern academy. Saito shows how kundoku (vernacular reading) and its rhythms were central to the rise of new inscriptional styles, charts the changing relationship of modern poets and novelists to kanbunmyaku, and concludes that the chronotope of modern Japan was based in a language world supported by the Literary Sinitic Context.
Author: Grzegorz Moroz
A Generic History of Travel Writing in Anglophone and Polish Literature offers a comprehensive, comparative and generic analysis of developments of travel writing in Anglophone and Polish literature from the Late Medieval Period to the twenty-first century. These developments are depicted in a wider context of travel narratives written in other European languages. Grzegorz Moroz convincingly argues that, for all the similarities and cross-cultural influences, in the course of the nineteenth and twentieth century non-fiction Anglophone and Polish travel writing have dynamically evolved different generic horizons of expectations. While the Anglophone travel book developed relatively steadily in that period, the Polish genre of the podróż was first replaced by the listy (kartki) z podróży, and then by the reportaż podróżniczy.
A Companion to Geoffrey of Monmouth brings together scholars from a range of disciplines to provide an updated scholarly introduction to all aspects of his work. Arguably the most influential secular writer of medieval Britain, Geoffrey (d. 1154) popularized Arthurian literature and left an indelible mark on European romance, history, and genealogy. Despite this outsized influence, Geoffrey’s own life, background, and motivations are little understood. The volume situates his life and works within their immediate historical context, and frames them within current critical discussion across the humanities. By necessity, this volume concentrates primarily on Geoffrey’s own life and times, with the reception of his works covered by a series of short encyclopaedic overviews, organized by language, that serve as guides to further reading.

Contributors are Jean Blacker, Elizabeth Bryan, Thomas H. Crofts, Siân Echard, Fabrizio De Falco, Michael Faletra, Ben Guy, Santiago Gutiérrez Garcia, Nahir I. Otaño Gracia, Paloma Gracia, Georgia Henley, David F. Johnson, Owain Wyn Jones, Maud Burnett McInerney, Françoise Le Saux, Barry Lewis, Coral Lumbley, Simon Meecham-Jones, Paul Russell, Victoria Shirley, Joshua Byron Smith, Jaakko Tahkokallio, Hélène Tétrel, Rebecca Thomas, Fiona Tolhurst.
Author: Samarpita Mitra
In Periodicals, Readers and the Making of a Modern Literary Culture: Bengal at the Turn of the Twentieth Century Samarpita Mitra studies literary periodicals as a particular print form, and reveals how their production and circulation were critical to the formation of a Bengali public sphere during the turn of the twentieth century. Given its polyphonic nature, capacity for sustaining debates and adaptability by readers with diverse reading competencies, periodicals became the preferred means for dispensing modern education and entertainment through the vernacular. The book interrogates some of the defining debates that shaped readers’ perspectives on critical social issues and explains how literary culture was envisioned as an indicator of the emergent nation. Finally it looks at the Bengali-Muslim and women’s periodicals and their readerships and argues that the presence of multiple literary voices make it impossible to speak of Bengali literary culture in any singular terms.
Author: Aurélien Lorig
Dans Le retentissant destin de Georges Darien à la Belle Époque, Aurélien Lorig s’intéresse à la vie et à l’œuvre d’un écrivain réfractaire peu connu. Avant d’être Darien, celui qui a pour patronyme Adrien est communément décrit comme un anarchiste et un marginal. En réalité, c’est un homme de lettres passionnant. L’ouvrage retrace le parcours d’un auteur plein de paradoxes, mais toujours fidèle à ses convictions individualistes. Malgré l’hostilité de ses contemporains, Darien croit au pouvoir des mots et pratique une écriture assassine où éthique comme esthétique replacent indéniablement l’écrivain dans le jeu fin-de-siècle des héritages et des lignages. De manière convaincante, Aurélien Lorig nous fait redécouvrir l’œuvre de Darien, laquelle pourrait inspirer les combats individuels, collectifs et sociaux d’aujourd’hui.

In Le retentissant destin de Georges Darien à la Belle Époque, Aurélien Lorig studies the life and the work of a little known, refractory author. Before he was Darien, the writer whose real surname was Adrien, is usually described as an anarchist, and an outcast. He actually was a fascinating man of letters. This essay recounts the journey of an author who, in spite of his numerous paradoxes, has always been true to his individualist values. In spite of his contemporaries' hostility, Darien believed in the power of words, and he practiced a murderous writing, in which ethics and aesthetics undeniably place the writer in the fin-de-siècle legacy and lineage game. Convincingly, Aurélien Lorig helps us to rediscover Darien's work, which could inspire us for individual, collective, and social nowadays struggles.

Abstract

The hierarchical system described by Pascale Casanova in The World Republic of Letters and La Langue mondiale is confirmed by the global phenomenon of relay translations, which attests that international exchanges are rarely bilateral. The study of relay or indirect translations completes what she says about the crucial role of mediators in the mechanisms of literary circulation. Yet the concrete processes of the intervention of the third party are only occasionally studied (in case studies) and are rarely synthesized. They bring into play mere configurations of the international in a non-systemic, but historical and not always deterministic way. This article attempts to theorize a practice that modifies the frames of thought of translation itself.

In: Journal of World Literature

Abstract

World literature studies is the most open field of all. In principle, it excludes nothing and no one. Things become interesting, however, when certain heroes emerge. In this article, I discuss two major influences on Pascale Casanova’s work which gave it a very distinctive position and generated new challenges. The adaptation of the sociology of Pierre Bourdieu in Casanova’s probes to what extent a theory developed to describe a predominantly national frame of reference could be transferred to the international domain. Casanova’s return to the question of the nation in her last work underlines the challenge of applying field theory in a world literature context. Casanova’s two monographs devoted to a single author, Samuel Beckett and Franz Kafka, respectively, are symptomatic for a particular kind of author in her critical work: the writer working from the semi-periphery in a way that makes a deep impact in the center.

In: Journal of World Literature
Author: David Damrosch

Abstract

Pascale Casanova’s seminal book has had an enormous and continuing impact around the world in a dozen languages, and as a result La République mondiale des lettres has itself become subject to the processes described within the book itself, as it enters world scholarly space. Casanova herself reflected directly on the somewhat unsettling results of this process, and her subsequent work was shaped in various ways by the international response to her pathbreaking book. This essay examines Casanova’s responses to the varied responses to her book, and suggests that her subsequent books should be understood as embodying a resulting mixture of resistance and rethinking of her earlier positions.

In: Journal of World Literature