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Reading Swift

Papers from The Seventh Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift

Edited by Hermann J. Real, Janika Bischof and Kirsten Juhas

Reading Swift assembles 27 lectures delivered at the Seventh Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift, which was held in celebration of the Dean’s 350th birthday at the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität in June 2017 under the patronage of the Irish ambassador in Germany. The new volume testifies to an extraordinary spectrum of research interests in the Dean of St Patrick’s, Dublin, and his works. It follows the tried and tested format of its predecessors, grouping the essays in eight sections: biographical problems; bibliographical and canonical studies; historical and religious as well as political, economic, and social issues; poetry; Gulliver’s Travels; and reception studies. Reading Swift is not only indicative of the élan vital, which has been such a distinctive feature of Swift scholarship in the past thirty-five years, under the aegis of the Ehrenpreis Centre it has also become a prestigious, indeed an invaluable, forum for the learned debate on all questions relating to the life and works of THE Dean, the only Dean in the history of Ireland.
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The Nature Essay

Ecocritical Explorations

Simone Schröder

The Nature Essay: Ecocritical Explorations is the first extended study of a powerful literary form born out of the traditions of Enlightenment and Romanticism. It traces the varied stylistic paradigms of the ‘nature essay’ down to the present day. Reading essays as platforms for ecological discourse, the book analyses canonical and marginalised texts, mainly from German, English and American literature. Simone Schröder argues that the essay’s environmental impact is rooted in its negotiation of scientific, poetic, spiritual, and ethical modes of perceiving nature. Together, the chapters on these four aspects form a historical panorama of the nature essay as a genre that continues to flourish in our time of ecological crisis.

Authors discussed include: Alexander von Humboldt, Henry David Thoreau, Virginia Woolf, Robert Musil, Ernst Jünger, W.G. Sebald, Kathleen Jamie, and David Foster Wallace.
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Meaningful Absence Across Arts and Media

The Significance of Missing Signifiers

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Edited by Werner Wolf, Nassim Balestrini and Walter Bernhart

This volume focusses on a rarely discussed method of meaning production, namely via the absence, rather than presence, of signifiers. It does so from an interdisciplinary, transmedial perspective, which covers systematic, media-comparative and historical aspects, and reveals various forms and functions of missing signifiers across arts and media. The meaningful silences, blanks, lacunae, pauses, etc., treated by the ten contributors are taken from language and literature, film, comics, opera and instrumental music, architecture, and the visual arts. Contributors are: Nassim Balestrini, Walter Bernhart, Olga Fischer, Saskia Jaszoltowski, Henry Keazor, Peter Revers, Klaus Rieser, Daniel Stein, Anselm Wagner, Werner Wolf
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Leo Courbot

With Fred D'Aguiar and Caribbean Literature: Metaphor, Myth, Memory, Leo Courbot offers the first research monograph entirely dedicated to a comprehensive reading of the verse and prose works of Fred D'Aguiar, prized American author of Anglo-Guyanese origin. “Postcolonial” criticism, when related to the history of the African diaspora, regularly inscribes itself in the wake of Sartrean philosophy. However, Fred D'Aguiar's both typical and untypical Caribbean background, in addition to the singularity of his diction, call for a different approach, which Leo Courbot convincingly carries out by reading literature in the light of Jacques Derrida and Édouard Glissant's less conventional sense of the intrinsically metaphorical and cross-cultural nature of language.
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Patricia San José Rico

How do contemporary African American authors relate trauma, memory, and the recovery of the past with the processes of cultural and identity formation in African American communities?
Patricia San José analyses a variety of novels by authors like Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor and David Bradley, and explores these works as valuable instruments for the disclosure, giving voice and public recognition of African American collective and historical trauma.
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Patrick McCabe’s Ireland

The Butcher Boy, Breakfast on Pluto and Winterwood

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Edited by Jennifer Keating

Few contemporary Irish writers have been more attuned to the historical influence of partition on Ireland’s culture and literary representation than Patrick McCabe. In the recent context of Brexit, his work produced in the late nineteen nineties and early two-thousands carries considerable poignancy, especially in relation to the Catholic Church, gender roles and persistence of a history of violence in Ireland. This volume attends to three novels, The Butcher Boy, Breakfast on Pluto and Winterwood as an emblematic representation of Ireland in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Contributors are: K. Brisley Brennan, Aisling Cormack, Flore Coulouma, Luke Gibbons, Lindsay Haney, Barbara Hoffmann, Jennifer Keating, James F. Knapp, Colin MacCabe, Kristina Varade.
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Edited by Marc Hersant and Catherine Ramond

Comme la destinataire des Mémoires du cardinal de Retz, l’époque classique « aime les portraits ». Ils abondent dans les jeux mondains, les récits historiques, les Mémoires, les lettres. Ils occupent également une place importante dans les fictions narratives de la période, et notamment dans les romans. L’ouvrage collectif Les Portraits dans les récits factuels et fictionnels de l’époque classique, édité par Marc Hersant et Catherine Ramond, propose une confrontation systématique de ces deux pratiques d’écriture, une analyse de leurs similitudes et de leurs différences. Sous un angle peu étudié jusqu’à présent, il couvre un large champ de l’écriture du portrait, à partir de nombreux exemples allant de Brantôme à Stendhal.

Like the recipient of the Cardinal de Retz’ Memoirs, the early modern period “loves portraits”. They can be found in social games, historical narratives, Memoirs, and letters. They also occupy an important place in narrative fiction of that period, especially in novels. The collective volume Les Portraits dans les récits factuels et fictionnels de l’époque classique, edited by Marc Hersant and Catherine Ramond, proposes a systematic confrontation of these two writing practices, and an analyses their similarities and differences. From a hitherto little studied angle, the book covers a wide range of examples of portrait writing, from Brantôme to Stendhal.
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"Vite, Vite Avant de Pleurer"

L'absolu de l'affect dans Textes pour rien

Jean-Pierre Martin

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The Unnamable Mirror

The Reflective Identity in Beckett's Prose

Michael Stewart