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The Challenges of Literary Translation
What can translations reveal about the global reception of any authorship? In Jane Austen Speaks Norwegian: The Challenges of Literary Translation, Marie Nedregotten Sørbø compares two novels and six translations of them. The discussion is entirely in English, as all Norwegian versions are back-translated. This study therefore lends itself to comparisons with other languages, and aims to fill its place as one component in a worldwide field of research; how Jane Austen is understood and transmitted. Moreover, this book presents a selection of pertinent issues for any translator, including abbreviation and elaboration, style and vocabulary, and censorship. Sørbø gives vivid examples of how literary translation happens, and how it serves to interpret and refashion literature for new readerships.
British Perceptions of Norway in the Nineteenth Century
In the nineteenth century, the ancient ‘filial tie’ between Britain and Norway was rediscovered by a booming tourist industry which took thousands across the North Sea to see the wonders of the fjords, the fjelds, and the beauties of the North Cape. This illustrated volume, for the first time, collects together vivid – and predominantly first-hand – impressions of the country recorded by nearly two hundred British travellers and other commentators, including Thomas Malthus, Charlotte Brontë, Lord Tennyson, and William Gladstone. In a rich selection of travel writing, fiction, poetry, journalism, political speeches, and art, Norway emerges as a refreshingly natural utopia, happily free from her imperial neighbour’s increasing problems with the side-effects of industrialisation.
This is a fascinating examination of the people, institutions, customs, language and environment of Norway seen through the eyes of the British. Using the tools of literary and historical scholarship, Fjågesund and Symes set these perceptions in their nineteenth-century context, throwing light on such issues as progress, art and aesthetics, democracy, religion, nationhood, race, class, and gender, all of which occupied Europe at the time. The Northern Utopia will be of particular interest to students of British and Scandinavian cultural history, literature and travel writing. It will also enthral all those who love Norway.