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Biblical Exegesis without Authorial Intention?

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Authorship and Meaning

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Edited by Clarissa Breu

In Biblical Exegesis without Authorial Intention? Interdisciplinary Approaches to Authorship and Meaning, Clarissa Breu offers interdisciplinary contributions to the question of the author in biblical interpretation with a focus on “death of the author” theory. The wide range of approaches represented in the volume comprises mostly postmodern theory (e. g. Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Paul de Man, Julia Kristeva and Gilles Deleuze), but also the implied author and intentio operis. Furthermore, psychology, choreography, reader-response theories and anthropological studies are reflected. Inasmuch as the contributions demonstrate that biblical studies could utilize significantly more differentiated views on the author than are predominantly presumed within the discipline, it is an invitation to question the importance and place attributed to the author.
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Alice Richir

Qui se cache derrière le « Je » et ses mensonges ? Écriture du fantasme plonge au cœur de la littérature contemporaine de langue française pour désigner comme fantasmes, au sens psychanalytique, les projections imaginaires qui peuplent les romans de Jean-Philippe Toussaint et Tanguy Viel. Prenant appui sur la définition du fantasme de Sigmund Freud et sur l’identification de sa logique par Jacques Lacan, la fiction fantasmatique est envisagée comme un moyen pour un narrateur à l’identité diffractée de faire récit. Cette nouvelle logique narrative est étudiée à la lumière des dispositifs modernes de l’image – photographie et cinéma, essentiellement –, dont Toussaint et Viel s’inspirent pour déconstruire les cadres représentatifs traditionnels et interroger le rapport entre identification et récit aujourd’hui.

Who lies behind the "I" and its deceitful nature? Écriture du fantasme delves into the heart of contemporary French-language literature to psychoanalytically designate as fantasies the imaginary projections which populate the novels of Jean-Philippe Toussaint and Tanguy Viel. Fantasized fiction is regarded as a means for a narrator with a diffracted identity to exist through the narration, based on how Sigmund Freud defined fantasy and on how Jacques Lacan deciphers its logic. This new sense of narration is studied through modern imagery devices – essentially photography and cinema. Toussaint and Viel use these as inspiration to deconstruct the traditional representative frameworks and question the current correlation between identification and narrative.
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Patrick McCabe’s Ireland

The Butcher Boy, Breakfast on Pluto and Winterwood

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Edited by Jennifer Keating

Few contemporary Irish writers have been more attuned to the historical influence of partition on Ireland’s culture and literary representation than Patrick McCabe. In the recent context of Brexit, his work produced in the late nineteen nineties and early two-thousands carries considerable poignancy, especially in relation to the Catholic Church, gender roles and persistence of a history of violence in Ireland. This volume attends to three novels, The Butcher Boy, Breakfast on Pluto and Winterwood as an emblematic representation of Ireland in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Contributors are: K. Brisley Brennan, Aisling Cormack, Flore Coulouma, Luke Gibbons, Lindsay Haney, Barbara Hoffmann, Jennifer Keating, James F. Knapp, Colin MacCabe, Kristina Varade.
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Luke Gibbons

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A psychoanalytic reading of Patrick McCabe’s novel and screen adaptation of The Butcher Boy suggests that the degeneration of Francie’s family unit betrays the effects of cultural and political violence in Ireland’s history. A compromised relationship, particularly between Francie and his mother, demonstrates the fragility of his psyche leading to the horrific murder of Mrs. Nugent. The familial relationship is read in the context of traumatic societal strife in twentieth century Irish and wider post World War ii European contexts.

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Flore Coulouma

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Legacies of globalization, colonialism and individual alienation are explored in the context of Patrick McCabe’s Mondo Desperado. Framed within the context of The Butcher Boy and Breakfast on Pluto, Mondo is explored as an example of modernity’s infringement on mythological notions of a pastoral Ireland. Colonial contexts, rising global economies and the absurdities therein are explored in this chapter.

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Jennifer Keating

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Barbara M. Hoffmann

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Patrick McCabe’s Francie Brady is read against his precedent, in James Joyce’s Stephen Dedalus, to explore the deterministic factors in mid-twentieth century Irish history that lead to madness instead of artistry in fiction protagonists. Motifs of cultural paralysis, exile, endemic cultural violence and the influence of the Catholic Church are each examined in this essay.

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James F. Knapp

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Illustrations of varied worlds are the central focus of this essay, drawing on the philosophical precedents offered by Leibniz, Lewis and Irish nationalists like Duffy as frameworks for exploring Patrick McCabe’s Breakfast on Pluto and Winterwood. A historical context documenting the rise and fall of the Irish economy, cycles of violence and abuses in the Catholic Church suggest the variety of worlds McCabe both creates and suggests in the context of his fiction.