Aktuelle Positionen der Vergleichenden Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaft
In Dialogue on Monarchy, Albert Sui-hung Lee applies Bakhtin’s dialogism to interpret the “unfinalized” dialogue on monarchical ideologies in the Gideon–Abimelech narrative. Lee associates the Bakhtinian concepts of “double-voiced dialogue,” “authoring,” “unfinalizability,” and heteroglossia with the literary features of “twoness,” dual images, and macrostructure of the dialogical narrative to illustrate the dialogue of genres as well as that of ideological voices, wherein the pro- and anti-monarchical voices constantly interact with each other. Studying archaeological evidence and literary examinations of prophetic books together, Lee explores the narrative redactor’s intention of engaging both remnant and deportee communities in an unfinalized dialogue of different forms of polity for the restoration of their unity and prosperity in exilic and post-exilic contexts.
Exotisme et établissement français aux Îles (1625-1671)
Cette étude propose d’examiner les ramifications historiques de l’exotisme à partir d’une lecture critique de l’ Histoire générale des Antilles (1654/1667-71) écrite par le missionnaire dominicain, Jean-Baptiste Du Tertre. En procédant d’une analyse littéraire, notre étude suggère une reconfiguration de l’exotisme basée à la fois sur la théorisation contemporaine et sur le contexte historique et l’esthétique de l’époque. Notre travail se veut donc à la fois théorique en offrant une analyse critique des différentes orientations de l’exotisme ; et historique, en présentant une lecture approfondie d’une œuvre dont l’importance est considérable aussi bien pour l’histoire de la littérature française et antillaise que pour l’histoire de l’anthropologie. À cet égard, cette étude fournira aussi une exploration de la toute première colonisation française des îles et de la manière dont elle a été représentée.

This book examines the historical ramifications of the concept of exoticism through a literary analysis of Histoire générale des Antilles (1654/1667-71) written by Dominican missionary Jean-Baptiste Du Tertre. The study gives a thorough account of the early French colonization of the islands and the ways in which this violent process of cultural encounters was represented. It argues for the necessity to reconfigure the notion of exoticism, both by revisiting contemporary theorization and by contextualizing it in regard to the history and aesthetics of the times. The study is thus both theoretical, in proceeding by a critical reading of different orientations of exoticism, and historical in offering an in-depth study of an author and a period that have received little attention despite their impact on French Caribbean literature and on the history of anthropology.
Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French analyses the literary transgressions of women’s writing in French since the turn of the twenty-first century in the works of major figures, such as Annie Ernaux and Véronique Tadjo, of the now established writers of the ‘nouvelle génération’, such as Marie Darrieussecq and Virginie Despentes, and in some of the most exciting and innovative authors from across the francosphère, from Nine Antico to Maïssa Bey and Chloé Delaume.
Pushing the boundaries of current thinking about normative and queer identities, local and global communities, family and kinship structures, bodies and sexualities, creativity and the literary canon, these authors pose the potential of reading and writing to also effectuate change in the world beyond the text.

Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French étudie les transgressions littéraires dans l’écriture des femmes en français depuis le début du XXIe siècle. L’analyse porte sur les oeuvres de figures majeures, telles qu’Annie Ernaux et Véronique Tadjo, d’auteures bien établies de la ‘nouvelle génération’, parmi lesquelles Marie Darrieussecq et Virginie Despentes, et de certaines des auteures les plus innovantes de la francosphère, de Nine Antico à Maïssa Bey en passant par Chloé Delaume. Repoussant les frontières de la pensée dominante sur les identités normatives ou queer, les communautés locales ou globales, les structures familiales ou de parenté, les corps ou les sexualités, la créativité ou le canon littéraire, ces auteures développent un potentiel de lecture et d’écriture porteur de changements au-delà du texte. Contributors /avec des contributions de: Ounissa Ait Benali, Jean Anderson, Kate Averis, Marzia Caporale, Dawn M. Cornelio, Sandra Daroczi, Sophie Guignard, Élise Hugueny-Léger, Irène Le Roy Ladurie, Siobhán McIlvanney, Michèle A. Schaal, Marta Segarra, Marinella Termite, Lyn Thomas, Antonia Wimbush
Figuren der Einverleibung zwischen Eucharistie und Anthropophagie
Author: Nathanael Pree

Abstract

The Rings of Saturn and other works by W.G. Sebald are discussed in conjunction with Landscape of Farewell, by Australian novelist Alex Miller, extending Aimé Césaire’s choc-en-retour, or “boomerang effect,” and following Michael Rothberg’s articulation of “Multidimensional Memory,” to inform a comparative, transcontinental analysis of specific aftershocks of colonialism. Contexts include contemporary Brussels, Indigenous Australia and the eroded coast of East Anglia. The effects of competing and complementary trajectories that arise from postcolonial memory, the presence of found books, following Homi Bhabha, and the intertextual presences of Joseph Conrad and explorer Ludwig Leichhardt, are discussed. The role of poesis articulated by an uncertain narrator against a background of exploitation and genocide is evaluated, as well as the effects of colonial activity on the landscape itself. In conclusion, the article considers the role of literature in effecting reconciliation and restitution.

In: Journal of World Literature
This transdisciplinary project represents the most comprehensive study of imagination to date. The eclectic group of international scholars who comprise this volume propose bold and innovative theoretical frameworks for (re-) conceptualizing imagination in all of its divergent forms. Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory explores the complex nuances, paradoxes, and aporias related to the plethora of artistic mediums in which the human imagination manifests itself. As a fundamental attribute of our species, which other organisms also seem to possess with varying degrees of sophistication, imagination is the very fabric of what it means to be human into which everything is woven. This edited collection demonstrates that imagination is the resin that binds human civilization together for better or worse.
Author: Mushtaq Bilal

Abstract

This paper investigates how Mohsin Hamid’s fiction challenges the so-called “natural law” of world literature according to which a work of literature has to be first born into a national literature before circulating into world literature. In addition, the paper shows how Hamid’s fiction and its reception strains the category of “national literature.” Building on the theoretical insights of Vittorio Coletti and Alexander Beecroft, I argue that Hamid’s 2017 novel Exit West can be read as a world novel because it narrates the world by framing the displacement of its characters in terms of migratory movement from the Global South to the Global North. The two narrative devices characteristic of the genre of world novel used in Exit West are: delocalization of place and entrelacement, or multi-strand narration.

In: Journal of World Literature
Author: Franco Moretti

Abstract

“Yes, interesting,” said someone from the audience, the first time I presented on dramatic networks; “but, as a mathematician, I feel I only understand something if I know how to ‘make’ it. So: how do you make a dramatic network? What elements does it need, what rules, what stages?” At the time, I had no idea how to respond; in a discipline like ours, where the objects of study are emphatically given – passed on with care, and often with reverence, from generation to generation – the idea of “making” Hamlet sounded half absurd, half sacrilegious. But that’s exactly my object here: neither real plays, nor even the networks that can be extracted from them, but their “simulations” instead.

In: Journal of World Literature
Author: Daniel Behar

Abstract

This article examines translation activity in modern Syria and its intersections with original works as a middle ground between world literature and postcolonial studies. It argues for a return to the multiplicity residing within a postcolonial national setting as a way of understanding poetic production in interaction with foreign poetries. Syrian translating as practiced in the state-endorsed literary periodical Al-Adab Al-Ajanbiyya (Foreign Literatures) is studied as a site of tension between a political rhetoric maintained by a growingly invasive state and the narrowing field of individual enterprise. How would world literature figure from the perspective of a state-backed, professedly Arab-socialist culture? How would this construction then be contested by agents struggling to carve out spaces for individual expression? What role does translation play in this struggle? The parameters of postcolonial experience and representation are themselves fought over in an unequal playing field between state power and beleaguered authors on the literary margins. Translations originating in politicized agendas then become constitutive of non-ideological engagements with world literature sanctioning deviations from state hegemony and promoting civilian agendas.

In: Journal of World Literature