Ideology in Postcolonial Texts and Contexts reflects that critiques of ideological formations occur within intersecting social, political, and cultural configurations where each position is in itself ‘ideological’ – and subject to asymmetrical power relations. Postcolonialism has become an object of critique as ideology, but postcolonial studies’ highly diversified engagement with ideology remains a strong focus that exceeds Ideologiekritik. Fourteen contributors from North America, Africa, and Europe focus (I) on the complex relation between postcolonialism, postcolonial theory, and conceptualizations of ideology, (II) on ideological formations that manifest themselves in very specific postcolonial contexts, highlighting the potential continuities between colonial and postcolonial ideology, and (III) on further expanding and complicating the nexus of postcolonial ideology, from veiling as both ideological practice and individual resistance to home as ideological construct; from palimpsestic readings of colonial photography to aesthetics as ideology.
The Dispute over Israel's Holiest Jewish Site, 1967–2000
The Western Wall—Judaism’s holiest site—occupies a prominent position in contemporary Jewish and Israeli discourse, current events, and local politics. In The Western Wall: The Dispute over Israel's Holiest Jewish Site, 1967–2000, Kobi Cohen-Hattab and Doron Bar offer a detailed exploration of the Western Wall plaza’s evolution in the late twentieth century. The examination covers the role of archaeology in defining the space, the Western Wall’s transformation as an Israeli and Jewish symbol, and the movement to open it to a variety of Jewish denominations. The book studies the central processes and shifts that took place at the Western Wall during the three decades that followed the Six-Day War—a relatively short yet crucial chapter in Jerusalem's extensive history.
Dans Témoignage et littérature d’après Auschwitz, Fransiska Louwagie offre des études critiques provenant de deux centres de gravité de la littérature de la Shoah et des camps nazis : les œuvres des témoins-survivants et celles des générations suivantes. Le livre explore les œuvres d’écrivains majeurs et parfois moins connus, comme celles de Robert Antelme, André Schwarz-Bart, Piotr Rawicz, Jorge Semprun et Imre Kertész, d’une part, et celles de Georges Perec, Raymond Federman, Gérard Wajcman, Henri Raczymow et Michel Kichka, de l’autre. En consacrant à chaque auteur une étude critique approfondie, Fransiska Louwagie fait pleinement droit à l’individualité des œuvres, tout en dégageant des perspectives transversales sur les questions éthiques et esthétiques qui sous-tendent le témoignage et la littérature d’après Auschwitz.

In Témoignage et littérature d’après Auschwitz, Fransiska Louwagie brings together two key areas of Holocaust literature, offering a rich analysis of both testimony and second generation writing. The book explores the works of major and sometimes lesser-known writers such as Robert Antelme, André Schwarz-Bart, Piotr Rawicz, Jorge Semprun, Imre Kertész, Georges Perec, Raymond Federman, Gérard Wajcman, Henri Raczymow and Michel Kichka. By devoting an in-depth critical study to each of these writers, the book draws out the individual specificity of their works, while also developing broader insights into the ethical and aesthetic questions that underlie acts of witnessing and writing ‘after Auschwitz’.
Literary Constructions of Inclusion, Exclusion, and Self-Definition (1756–1871)
Long before it took political shape in the proclamation of the German Empire of 1871, a German nation-state had taken shape in the cultural imagination. Covering the period from the Seven Years’ War to the Reichsgründung of 1871, Nationalism before the Nation State: Literary Constructions of Inclusion, Exclusion, and Self-Definition (1756–1871) explores how the nation was imagined by different groups, at different times, and in connection with other ideologies. Between them the eight chapters in this volume explore the connections between religion, nationalism and patriotism, and individual chapters show how marginalised voices such as women and Jews contributed to discourses on national identity. Finally, the chapters also consider the role of memory in constructing ideas of nationhood.

Contributors are: Johannes Birgfeld, Anita Bunyan, Dirk Göttsche, Caroline Mannweiler, Alex Marshall, Dagmar Paulus, Ellen Pilsworth, and Ernest Schonfield.
In: Nationalism before the Nation State
Author: Ellen Pilsworth

Abstract

This chapter explores the moral dilemmas encountered by the Enlightenment writer and pedagaogue Rudolph Zacharias Becker around the concepts of nationalism and war. His meticulous selection and adaptation of texts for the two editions of his Mildheimisches Liederbuch (an originally pedagogical work designed to teach peasants more Enlightened ways of thinking) reveal the issues of war and nationalism to have been greatly troubling for him, yet also, unfortunately, unavoidable. While the first edition of Mildheimisches Liederbuch in 1799 treated war as a moral problem, the second edition in 1815 contained a great many new songs proclaiming the anti-French and pro-war sentiments that had arisen during the Wars of Liberation, even though his personal memoir from this period argued for tolerance and respect of the French. Why, then, did he include this anti-French material in the 1815 collection? I interpret Becker’s choice to include pro-war texts with which he did not agree as an attempt to respect freedom of different political opinions, rather than to censor and control them, in the aftermath of Napoleonic occupation.

In: Nationalism before the Nation State
Author: Dagmar Paulus

Abstract

This chapter discusses Briefe auf einer Reise nach Petersburg an Freunde geschrieben [Letters to Friends from a Journey to Petersburg], by writer and traveller Fanny Tarnow (1779–1862). First published in 1819, this travelogue contains two discourses of exclusion: one based on gender and the other on culture. Tarnow is victim of the former and complicit in the latter. On the one hand, the difficulties faced by Tarnow as a female writer resonate throughout her text. As a woman who had the audacity not only to write and publish but also to travel and live abroad for two years, Tarnow was acutely aware of the restrictions placed upon her based on her gender. On the other hand, however, she constructs a notion of German national identity in contrast to the perceived Otherness, and inferiority, of Russia. Tarnow, in this context, makes use of common national stereotypes that were already virulent at the time, and even claims that nature in Russia is fundamentally different and inferior to German nature. Hence, her letters from Petersburg oscillate between confident self-assertion as a German (and therefore, ‘inherently superior’ to her Russian counterparts) and self-conscious justification as a female author-traveller (and therefore, ‘inherently inferior’ to her male counterparts).

In: Nationalism before the Nation State
In: Nationalism before the Nation State
In: Nationalism before the Nation State
In: Nationalism before the Nation State