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Organization and Newness

Discourses and Ecologies of Innovation in the Creative University

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Edited by Michael A. Peters and Susanne Maria Weber

Organization and Newness: Discourses and Ecologies of Innovation in the Creative University offers a view from a perspective of organizational education on the ‘new’, which analyzes the production of the ‘new’ within organizations, in relation to the inherent learning processes. Fundamental for this perspective is the question about the changeability of organizations, especially when these are not viewed only as instrumentally established regulatory structures but rather as social constructs. The contributions of this volume contour the complexity of newness in organization and form a bridge from critical analysis of imperative discourse of newness, to programmatic pleas of an organizational pedagogy, which is normative in nature, for a reconfiguration of organizational and societal relationships. The issue at hand shows how tightly the question about newness is constitutively woven into the self-conception of organizational education and pedagogy.
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The Labour of Words in Higher Education

Is it Time to Reoccupy Policy?

Sarah Hayes

As Higher Education has come to be valued for its direct contribution to the global economy, university policy discourse has reinforced this rationale. In The Labour of Words in Higher Education: Is It Time to Reoccupy McPolicy? two globes are depicted. One is a beautiful, but complete artefact, that markets a UK university. The second sits on a European city street and is continually inscribed with the markings of passers-by. A distinction is drawn between the rhetoric of university McPolicy, as a discourse that appears to no longer require input from humans, and a more authentic approach to writing policy, that acknowledges the academic labour of staff and students, in effecting change.

Inspired by the work of George Ritzer on the McDonaldization of Society (1992, 1997, 2008, 2018), the term McPolicy is adopted by the author, to describe a rational method of writing policy, now widespread across UK universities. Recent strategies on ‘the student experience’, ‘technology enhanced learning’, ‘student engagement’ and ‘employability’ are explored through a corpus-based Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA). Findings are humourously compared to the marketing of consumer goods, where commodities like cars are invested with human qualities, such as ‘ambition’. Similarly, McPolicy credits non-human strategies, technologies and a range of socially constructed buzz phrases, with the human qualities and labour activities that would normally be enacted by staff and students.

This book is written for anyone with an interest in the future of universities. It concludes with suggestions of ways we might all reoccupy McPolicy.
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Edited by Dianne Siemon, Tasos Barkatsas and Rebecca Seah

The relationship between research and practice has long been an area of interest for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners alike. One obvious arena where mathematics education research can contribute to practice is the design and implementation of school mathematics curricula. This observation holds whether we are talking about curriculum as a set of broad, measurable competencies (i.e., standards) or as a comprehensive set of resources for teaching and learning mathematics. Impacting practice in this way requires fine-grained research that is focused on individual student learning trajectories and intimate analyses of classroom pedagogical practices as well as large-scale research that explores how student populations typically engage with the big ideas of mathematics over time. Both types of research provide an empirical basis for identifying what aspects of mathematics are important and how they develop over time.

This book has its origins in independent but parallel work in Australia and the United States over the last 10 to 15 years. It was prompted by a research seminar at the 2017 PME Conference in Singapore that brought the contributors to this volume together to consider the development and use of evidence-based learning progressions/trajectories in mathematics education, their basis in theory, their focus and scale, and the methods used to identify and validate them. In this volume they elaborate on their work to consider what is meant by learning progressions/trajectories and explore a range of issues associated with their development, implementation, evaluation, and on-going review. Implications for curriculum design and future research in this field are also considered.

Contributors are: Michael Askew, Tasos Barkatsas, Michael Belcher, Rosemary Callingham, Doug Clements, Jere Confrey, Lorraine Day, Margaret Hennessey, Marj Horne, Alan Maloney, William McGowan, Greg Oates, Claudia Orellana, Julie Sarama, Rebecca Seah, Meetal Shah, Dianne Siemon, Max Stephens, Ron Tzur, Jane Watson.
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Edited by Merja Paksuniemi and Pigga Keskitalo

Over the last decade, Finland’s educational system has become internationally recognised. Different countries have shown an interest in learning about the Finnish education system to gain a better understanding of how education is developed, planned and executed in that country. The Introduction to the Finnish Educational System aims to describe how the education system in Finland was built and what kind of aspects influence learning and teaching today. The authors of the chapters are academics and experts in the fields of teacher education or vocational education. The book presents a review of the historical and current aspects of the educational system of Finland. As such, it describes the learning path from compulsory education to vocational education and primary school teacher education, which is one of the main focuses of the Faculty of Education at the University of Lapland. Each chapter is based on its authors’ research results, which are adapted for inclusion in this book. It answers an international call to provide an in-depth description of the National Finnish Education System from its beginning to today and to discuss the practical implications of these measures.

Contributors are: Heikki Ervast, Marjaana Kangas, Pigga Keskitalo, Otso Kortekangas, Minna Körkkö, Outi Kyrö-Ämmälä, Pertti Lakkala, Suvi Lakkala, Merja Paksuniemi, Rauna Rahko-Ravantti, Päivi Rasi, and Heli Ruokamo.
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World-Class Universities

Towards a Global Common Good and Seeking National and Institutional Contributions

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Edited by Yan Wu, Qi Wang and Nian Cai Liu

In the era marked by globalization and its profound impacts on individuals, societies, states and markets, world-class universities need to position themselves in the forefront of seeking conceptual and practical solutions to daunting challenges by paying greater attention to their roles in serving local society and contributing to global common goods. Based on the findings of the Seventh International Conference on World-Class Universities, World-Class Universities: Towards a Global Common Good and Seeking National and Institutional Contributions provides updated insights and debates on how world-class universities will contribute to the global common good and balance their global, national and local roles in doing so.
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The Translational Design of Universities

An Evidence-Based Approach

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Edited by Kenn Fisher

Whilst the schools are transforming their physical and virtual environments at a relatively glacial pace in most countries across the globe, universities are under extreme pressure to adapt to the rapid emergence of the virtual campus. Competition for students by online course providers is increasing and resulting in a parallel rapidly emerging impact in understanding what the nature of the traditional campus will look like in the 21st century.

In blending the virtual and the physical, technology enabled active blended, or hybrid, earning environments are now integrating the face-to-face and online virtual experience synchronously and asynchronously. Local branch campuses are emerging in city and town centres, and international branch campuses are growing at a rapid rate.There is also an increasing pressure at a number of levels the city/urban, the campus as a whole, the formal and informal learning spaces, plus the library and social or third-space levels.

Many new hybrid campus developments are not based on any form of scholarly rigorous evidence with the risk that many of these projects may fail. In taking an evidence-based approach this book seeks to align with the model of translational research from medical practice, using a modified ‘translational design’ approach. The majority of the chapter material comes from scholarly pieces of work through the efforts of doctoral graduates and their dissertations.

This book is the second in a series on evidence-based translational design of educational institutions, with the first volume focussing on schools. The current volume on Higher Education seeks to cover the city to the classroom and those elements in between. In so doing it also seeks to fathom what the future might look like as judgements are made about what does work in campus planning and design, in both the virtual and physical worlds.

Contributors are: Neda Abbasi, Ronald Beckers, Flavia Curvelo Magdaniel, Mollie Dollinger, Robert A. Ellis, Barry J. Fraser, Kobi (Jacov) Haina, Leah Irving, Ji Yu, Marian Mahat, Saadia Majeed, Mahmoud Reza Saghafi, Panayiotis Skordi, Jacqueline Pizzuti-Ashby, Leanne Rose-Munro, and Alejandra Torres-Landa Lopez.
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Edited by Tasos Barkatsas, Nicky Carr and Grant Cooper

The second decade of the 21st century has seen governments and industry globally intensify their focus on the role of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as a vehicle for future economic prosperity. Economic opportunities for new industries that are emerging from technological advances, such as those emerging from the field of artificial intelligence also require greater capabilities in science, mathematics, engineering and technologies. In response to such opportunities and challenges, government policies that position STEM as a critical driver of economic prosperity have burgeoned in recent years. Common to all these policies are consistent messages that STEM related industries are the key to future international competitiveness, productivity and economic prosperity.
This book presents a contemporary focus on significant issues in STEM teaching, learning and research that are valuable in preparing students for a digital 21st century. The book chapters cover a wide spectrum of issues and topics using a wealth of research methodologies and methods ranging from STEM definitions to virtual reality in the classroom; multiplicative thinking; STEM in pre-school, primary, secondary and tertiary education, opportunities and obstacles in STEM; inquiry-based learning in statistics; values in STEM education and building academic leadership in STEM.
The book is an important representation of some of the work currently being done by research-active academics. It will appeal to academics, researchers, teacher educators, educational administrators, teachers and anyone interested in contemporary STEM Education related research in a rapidly changing globally interconnected world.

Contributors are: Natalie Banks, Anastasios (Tasos) Barkatsas, Amanda Berry, Lisa Borgerding, Nicky Carr, Io Keong Cheong, Grant Cooper, Jan van Driel, Jennifer Earle, Susan Fraser, Noleine Fitzallen, Tricia Forrester, Helen Georgiou, Andrew Gilbert, Ineke Henze, Linda Hobbs, Sarah Howard, Sylvia Sao Leng Ieong, Chunlian Jiang, Kathy Jordan, Belinda Kennedy, Zsolt Lavicza, Tricia Mclaughlin, Wendy Nielsen, Shalveena Prasad, Theodosia Prodromou, Wee Tiong Seah, Dianne Siemon, Li Ping Thong, Tessa E. Vossen and Marc J. de Vries.
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Academic Growth in Higher Education

Questions and Answers

Edited by Helena Pedrosa-de-Jesus and Mike Watts

Many changes in higher education have derived from Europe-wide initiatives such as the Bologna process, and have given increasing attention to student-centred learning and teaching approaches, allied to growth in teachers’ scholarship and academic development. Academic Growth in Higher Education: Questions and Answers centers around a decade-long research project, which is one component of a long-standing programme focused on ways to promote academic development and scholarship in higher education.

The purpose of the book is to highlight debates and issues important in teaching and learning at the tertiary level in universities, colleges and schools – exploring issues that teachers and lecturers will need to address throughout their professional lives. These issues surround acts of student-centred learning, inquiry-based learning, teachers’ own practices in the classroom and, every bit as significant, the activities generated by their students in the process of learning. The intention is to identify some of the debates relevant to teaching and learning, to challenge some of the orthodoxies within traditional forms of teaching and learning, and to suggest some solutions though current practice over a wide context of activity.
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People with Intellectual Disability Experiencing University Life

Theoretical Underpinnings, Evidence and Lived Experience

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Edited by Patricia O’Brien, Michelle L. Bonati, Friederike Gadow and Roger Slee

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Without a Margin for Error

Urban Immigrant English Language Learners in STEM

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Jeremy B. Heyman

In Without a Margin for Error, the author chronicles the journeys of young adults in an under-served urban community who are new to the English language into STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics-related) fields from high school through college. He distills lessons, themes, and policy recommendations from the trails blazed by these students toward altering the status quo around college access and STEM success for often-marginalized but highly resilient young adults with much to contribute to their new nation, their communities, and the world. While drawing on a critical ethnography of over three dozen inspiring young adults, seven students are chronicled in greater depth to bring to life crucial conversations for redefining college readiness, access, and success in STEM fields.