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Ein interkultureller Vergleich zwischen dem Philanthropinum in Dessau und dem Colegio de las Vizcaínas in Mexiko-Stadt
Author: Eva Rautenberg
Aufklärung und Schule, Männer und Frauen in Dessau und in Mexiko. Eine kulturhistorische Betrachtung und Darstellung einer facettenreichen und vielfältigen Wirklichkeit.
Thematisiert werden Szenen des Alltags und des Schullebens, die in zwei verschiedenen westlichen Kontexten zur Zeit der Aufklärung stattfanden: Dessau und Neuspanien bzw. das koloniale Mexiko. In dieser Ausführung zeigen sich die Macht- und Herrschaftsverhältnisse, die sowohl innerhalb der politischen Kontrolle als auch im Bereich des Akademischen ausgeübt wurden. Das Werk versteht sich als ein alternativer methodologischer Ansatz für die Vergleichende Pädagogik.
Trans-national Perspectives on Access, Equity, and Internationalization
Refugees and Higher Education provides a cross-disciplinary lens on one American university’s approach to studying the policies, practices, and experiences associated with the higher education of refugee background students. The focus is not only on refugee education as an issue of access and equity, but also on this phenomenon as seen through the lens of internationalization. What competencies are called for among university faculty and staff welcoming refugee-background students to their institutional contexts? How might “distance learning” be considered anew? These challenges and opportunities for institutional growth will be closely considered by this group of authors from educational leadership, social work, curriculum development, and higher education itself. They address key world regions, and sub-topics ranging from online education in refugee camps to the Brazilian and Colombian responses to the emerging crisis in Venezuela. Scholars researching refugee education cross-nationally often find that refugee education literature is parsed by disciplinary field. This book, in contrast, offers a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary overview of refugee education issues around the world. These perspectives also provide key insights for faculty and staff at higher education institutions that currently enroll asylees or refugees, as well as those that may do so in the future.
The lack of academic integrity combined with the prevalence of fraud and other forms of unethical behavior are problems that higher education faces in both developing and developed countries, at mass and elite universities, and at public and private institutions. While academic misconduct is not new, massification, internationalization, privatization, digitalization, and commercialization have placed ethical challenges higher on the agenda for many universities. Corruption in academia is particularly unfortunate, not only because the high social regard that universities have traditionally enjoyed, but also because students—young people in critical formative years—spend a significant amount of time in universities. How they experience corruption while enrolled might influence their later personal and professional behavior, the future of their country, and much more. Further, the corruption of the research enterprise is especially serious for the future of science. The contributors to Corruption in Higher Education: Global Challenges and Responses bring a range of perspectives to this critical topic.
Visual Methodologies and Approaches to Research in the Early Years
Editor: E. Jayne White
Seeing the World through Children’s Eyes brings an overarching emphasis on ‘seeing’ to early years research. The book provides an opportunity to see and hear from leading researchers in the field concerning how they work with visual methodologies and young children. It explores the problems, pitfalls and promises that these offer for reflexive, critical inquiry that privileges the ‘work of the eye’ whilst implicating the researcher ‘I’ for what is revealed. Readers are invited to see for themselves what might be revealed through their discoveries, and to contemplate how these ideas might influence their own seeings.
Career brings together individuals’ paths through life, learning and work. It describes how people interface with social institutions including the education system, employers, civil society and the state. Because our careers are socially and culturally embedded it matters where they are enacted. Career and Career Guidance in the Nordic Countries explores what kind of context the Nordic region offers for the pursuit of career, how the development of careers are supported in welfare societies, and how career guidance is enacted in this context.

The Nordic region encompasses an area in Northern Europe and the Northern Atlantic comprising Denmark, Sweden, Norway as well as Finland to the east and Iceland in the Atlantic. It includes also the self-governing areas of Åland, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. This region has long been seen as a source of progressive policy innovation in education and employment and this book focuses and explores the place, the enactment and the theories of career guidance in these Nordic countries.

Abstract

Demographic trends are leading to increased and extended workforce participation by older workers, raising the requirement for career guidance to serve this population. This chapter argues that older people have distinctive career guidance needs. Drawing upon a small-scale research study, it identifies characteristics of older people and their largely unmet guidance needs. It goes on to propose particular considerations to be borne in mind in planning to meet the needs of older workers.

In: Career and Career Guidance in the Nordic Countries

Abstract

Using Foucault’s analytical tools this chapter explores the development of career guidance historically and contextually and examines how it is imbued with different ideologies, discourses and forms of power to produce subjectivity. The chapter identifies the emergence of five discourses and related productions of subjectivity and places these in the context of the development of guidance in Norway. These are described as the philanthropic, industrial, welfare state, neoliberal and knowledge society discourses. Finally, Nordic counter discourses are explored. The chapter argues that career guidance in Norway has a political function, that it produces forms of subjectivity and acts as a governing technology.

In: Career and Career Guidance in the Nordic Countries

Abstract

This chapter will address the need for a more collective approach to the career counselling of refugees and immigrants arriving in the Nordic countries. In order to meet their needs, we must define the concept and purpose of career guidance in broader ways. Picture-based group guidance seems to be particularly relevant for refugees with limited educational backgrounds. Common career guidance sessions for couples generally seems to work really well. In a Nordic context we must be particularly aware that family relations play a central role in most refugees’ establishment of a new life in our societies. This might challenge the typical Nordic notion of integration as consensus and sameness.

In: Career and Career Guidance in the Nordic Countries

Abstract

The Nordic self-governing regions (the Faroe Islands, Greenland and the Åland Islands) pose a specific context for careers guidance policy and practice. Characterised by their island topographies, small populations and historically minoritised languages, these regions have in recent years gained greater autonomy over their domestic affairs. As a result steps have been taken towards developing domestic careers guidance policy and practice suitable for their own territories. In this chapter case studies of two of these regions will be presented – Greenland and the Faroes – in order to explore the specific challenges and opportunities facing these communities. With both regions historically subordinate to the Danish crown, these communities have a shared inheritance in terms of education, economic and careers policy, and they also face shared challenges in terms of their distinctive labour markets, language contexts and concerns with migration. However, as this chapter will show the specific manifestation of these challenges, and responses to these challenges has differed between the communities. The findings demonstrate how the communities of Greenland and the Faroe Islands are developing approaches to careers guidance policy and practice which draw from existing Nordic approaches, and benefit substantially from Nordic co-operation, but which also challenge and develop their Nordic and specifically Danish inheritances to create distinctive new models.

In: Career and Career Guidance in the Nordic Countries

Abstract

This chapter presents the findings from an exploratory study of career guidance and career learning in primary schools in Norway. Most primary schools in Norway do not have strategies and policies for career guidance, and career learning is largely unknown as a concept. Nevertheless, they sometimes “unknowingly” engage in such activities. Many schools, in fact, implement several relevant initiatives to children’s career exploration as part of, or outside of, formal curricula/subjects. The challenge is to develop such unintentional career learning into intentional career learning. This does not have to be a radical change in schools. Primarily, it is a question of awareness of career learning and recognition that the same activity or subject can have two effects.

In: Career and Career Guidance in the Nordic Countries