Grandparents, Grandchildren, Schools, Communities, and Churches
This book presents nuanced small-scale studies and reflective essays, and is about voices of contemporary grandparents and grandchildren living in the State of Hawai'i which is rapidly going through economic, social, educational, and cultural transformation ushered in by forces of globalization and McDonaldization of society.

Hawai‘i is generally known as a great tourist destination that is no less than an imagined paradise. Hawai‘i is more than solely a site for tourism; it has a culturally and socially diverse population, and has a contested social history. In this context, in a deeper sense, the book gives the reader glimpses of family members at the level of intimacy among themselves in their place based situated interactions in today’s Hawai‘i. In its real essence, this book is an authentic collection of research papers, short stories, anecdotes, memories and reminiscences; of aloha (love, compassion, kindness) and mahalo (thanks, respect, and praise); of longing and search for legacy by diasporic elders, immigrants, settlers, American citizens, hyphenated Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders; by grandparents and grandchildren of diverse and multiple ethnicities, cultures, and races who have struggled hard through many decades to make Hawai‘i their permanent and beloved home and place, or long-term residence to live and raise their families.

The set of self-narratives in this book may have significant implications for understanding the process of aging in the State of Hawai'i; for social aging is both an individual and a social process in the sense that an individual’s biography is intimately related to her/his society’s biography. For “doing” roles such as being grandparents and grandchildren are heavily defined and structured by prevailing social and cultural processes.

The book may be useful for educators and students who are working and studying in areas such as education, sociology of family, social work, local and global social change, indigenous cultures and societies, alternative modernities and indigenizing social movements, race and ethnic relations, settler societies, social justice, health care, social gerontology, diaspora and immigration studies, and those working with youth in communities.
Naming the Politics of Race, Social Class, Gender, and Power
As more students of color continue to make up our nation’s schools, finding ways to address their academic and cultural ways knowing become important issues. This book explores these intersections, by covering a variety of topics related to race, social class, and gender, all within a multiyear study of a mentoring program that is situated within U.S. K-12 schools. Furthermore, the role of power is central to the analyses as the contributors examine questions, tensions, and posit overall critical takes on mentoring. Finally, suggestions for designing critical and holistic programming are provided.

Contributors are: Shanyce L. Campbell, Juan F. Carrillo, Tim Conder, Dana Griffin, Alison LaGarry, George Noblit, Danielle Parker Moore, Esmeralda Rodriguez, and Amy Senta.
Contemporary Research in School Belonging
School belonging should be a priority across every facet of education. The research on school belonging for positive student outcomes has been widely accepted and findings demonstrating its role as a protective factor against mental ill health and youth suicide are too compelling to ignore. In an age where it has been argued that academic achievement is prioritised over wellbeing, the editors bring the importance of school belonging back to the fore in educational policy and planning. This book is the most comprehensive compendium of its kind on the topic of school belonging. A foreword by Professor John Hattie of The University of Melbourne sets the scene for an engaging look at how school belonging is quintessential in contemporary schooling.

Contributors are: Kelly-Ann Allen, Christopher Boyle, Jonathan Cohen, Crystal Coker, Erin Dowdy, Clemence Due, Jonathan K. Ferguson, Sebastian Franke, Michael Furlong, Annie Gowing, Alun Jackson, Divya Jindal-Snape, Andrew Martinez, Daniel Mays, Vicki McKenzie, Susan Dvorak McMahon, Franka Metzner, Kathryn Moffa, Silke Pawils, Damien W. Riggs, Sue Roffey, Lisa Schneider, Bini Sebastian, Christopher D. Slaten, Jessica Smead, Amrit Thapa, Dianne Vella-Brodrick, Lea Waters, Michelle Wichmann, and Holger Zielemanns.
Understanding, Complicating, and Transcending Police-Community Violence
Many urban centres are shaken to their core with mistrust between communities and law enforcement. Erosion was exacerbated in the Obama-era, intensified during the 2016 campaign, and is violently manifested in Trump’s presidency. The promise of uniting communities articulated by leaders lays broken. The text suggests that promise of prosperous and engaged urban citizenry will remain broken until we can honestly address the following unanswered questions: What factors contribute to the creation of divided communities? What happened to erode trust between community and law enforcement? What concerns and challenges do law enforcement officials have relating to policing within urban centres? What are the experiences of residents and police? And, finally, whose lives really matter, and how do we move forward?

Contributors are: Lawrence Baines, Amber C. Bryant, Erica L. Bumpers, Issac Carter, Justin A. Cole, Erin Dreeszen, Jaquial Durham, Antonio Ellis, Idara Essien, Jeffrey M. Frank, Beatriz Gonzalez, Aaron J. Griffen, Jennie L. Hanna, Diane M. Harnek Hall, Cleveland Hayes, Deanna Hayes-Wilson, Stacey Hill, Jim L. Hollar, Taharee A. Jackson, Melinda Jackson-Jefferson, Sharon D. Jones-Eversley, Stephen M. Lentz, Patricia Maloney, Isiah Marshall, Jr., Derrick McKisick, Rebecca Neal, Ariel Quinio, Jacqueline M. Rhoden-Trader, Derrick Robinson, Ebony B. Rose, Randa Suleiman, Clarice Thomas, Kerri J. Tobin, Eddie Vanderhorst, Rolanda L. Ward, Deondra Warner, John Williams, Deleon M. Wilson, Geoffrey L. Wood, Jemimah L. Young, and Jie Yu.