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Activist Identity Development of Transgender Social Justice Activists and Educators introduces an anti-oppressive, critical and intersectional approach to social justice activism and education, and adult education for social change. This book examines how state governments, laws, policies, institutions, and systems of dominant hegemonic ideologies, such as education systems, the legal systems, and their gatekeepers influence the social position and epistemic agency of transgender and gender non-conforming people (TGNC), therefore shaping their social justice activist and educator identity development. The research was conducted with eight TGNC social justice activists and educators from eight different countries, who were at the time in leadership positions in organizations working on the advancement of LGBTQI human rights.

This volume seeks not only to understand and interpret power structures, power relations and inequalities in society which determine social positionality of trans activists and influence the formation and development of their activist identity, but also to challenge them by raising critical consciousness, questioning dominant cultural, political, and social domains which determine knowledge production. It advocates for a trans-affirming, intersectional approach to educational provision, theory, and research.
A Decolonizing Approach to Community-Based Action Research
Many community health interventions fail, wasting tax dollars and human resources. These interventions are typically designed by subject matter experts who don’t have direct experience with the local community. In contrast, successful interventions are built from the ground up, planned and implemented by the people that will benefit from them, using community-based action research. Researching With: A Decolonizing Approach to Community-Based Action Research is a guide for how to do research that is inclusive, engages in community-building, and implements a decolonizing framework. This text advocates for a collaborative approach, researching with communities, rather than conducting research on them. Reviewing both theory and method, Jessica Smartt Gullion and Abigail Tilton offer practical tips for forming community partnerships and building coalitions. Researching With also includes helpful information about incorporating community work into a successful academic career. This book can be used as supplemental or primary reading in courses in sociology, social work, health research, nursing, public health, qualitative inquiry, and research methods, and is also of value to individual researchers and graduate students writing their thesis.
This text explores the re-assertion of right-wing populist and fascist ideologies as presented and distributed in the media. In particular, attacks on immigrants, women, minorities, and LGBTQI people are increasing, inspired by the election of politicians who openly support authoritarian discourse and scapegoating. More troubling is how this discourse is inscribed into laws and policies.

Despite the urgency of the situation, the Left has been unable to effectively respond to these events, from liberals insisting on hands-off free speech policies, including covering "both sides of the issue" to socialists who utilize a tunnel vision focus on economic issues at the expense of women and minorities. In order to effectively resist right-wing movements of this magnitude, a socialist/Marxist feminist analysis is necessary for understanding how racism, sexism, and homophobia are conduits for capitalism, not just ‘identity issues.’

Topics addressed in this text include an overview of dialectical materialist feminism and its relevance and a review of characteristics of authoritarian populism and fascism. Additionally, the insistence on a colorblind conceptualization of the working class is critiqued, with its detrimental effects on moving resistance and activism forward. This was a key weakness with the Bernie Sanders campaign, which is discussed. Online environments and their alt-right discourse/function are used as an example of the ineffectiveness of e-libertarianism, which has prioritized hands-off administration, allowing right-wing discourse to overcome many online spaces. Other topics include the emergence of the fetal personhood construct in response to abortion rights, and the rejection of science and expertise.

Abstract

Abortion in the media continues to escape the grasp of sound feminist analysis for a variety of reasons. This chapter asserts that the construct of fetal personhood has been used to objectify women as vessels for carrying children, erode solidarity among working class women, dismantle the social safety net, and increase surveillance of women’s bodies. A historical overview of the development of abortion law and policy is presented, along with important facts about the need for this essential reproductive health service.

In: Enough Already! A Socialist Feminist Response to the Re-emergence of Right Wing Populism and Fascism in Media

Abstract

This chapter examines what went wrong with the promising Bernie Sanders campaign. In particular, the insistence on a colorblind economic message meant to appeal to young college students and white male workers at the expense of what were dismissed as “identity politics” is critiqued. Much of what was seen from Sanders followers was similar to what women and minorities experienced in the leftist activist movements in the 1960s, so a historical overview of these activist movements will be presented.

In: Enough Already! A Socialist Feminist Response to the Re-emergence of Right Wing Populism and Fascism in Media

Abstract

The conclusion will tie together the concepts from the prior chapters along with making a final appeal for a determined and militant resistance to right-wing populism and fascism.

In: Enough Already! A Socialist Feminist Response to the Re-emergence of Right Wing Populism and Fascism in Media

Abstract

There is much conflation of fascism with authoritarian populism, which makes fighting these movements more challenging. An overview of characteristics of right-wing movements are presented, including rampant misogyny and racism. This chapter discusses what each has in common, but also presents important differences. The common media approach of equating historical events to the present will also be critiqued for its role in hyperbole and spreading confusion.

In: Enough Already! A Socialist Feminist Response to the Re-emergence of Right Wing Populism and Fascism in Media

Abstract

This chapter presents a fierce defense of the need for science in the era of questioning of expertise and knowledge. An examination of the political functions of conspiracy theories, which serve up the target of the “big guy” to take the pressure off of capitalism and its effects, is included. The dislike and distrust of “big government” with its emphasis on isolationism and individualized solutions is part of an ongoing attack on the public commons.

In: Enough Already! A Socialist Feminist Response to the Re-emergence of Right Wing Populism and Fascism in Media

Abstract

This introductory chapter opens with the assertion that the left has been woefully inadequate in combatting the recent rise of fascism and right-wing populism, primarily because it retains faith in tenets of liberalism (unrestricted free speech, including racist speech; belief in rationally presenting the facts; and clinging to a colorblind economic analysis). Several examples from current events/media will be presented to orient the reader to the rest of the book.

In: Enough Already! A Socialist Feminist Response to the Re-emergence of Right Wing Populism and Fascism in Media

Abstract

An overview of socialist feminism and the rationale for this dialectical approach is presented, along with support for its use in critically examining media. The history of feminism(s) in this chapter will illustrate different competing narratives in terms of fighting capitalism.

In: Enough Already! A Socialist Feminist Response to the Re-emergence of Right Wing Populism and Fascism in Media