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Edited by Dianne Siemon, Tasos Barkatsas and Rebecca Seah

The relationship between research and practice has long been an area of interest for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners alike. One obvious arena where mathematics education research can contribute to practice is the design and implementation of school mathematics curricula. This observation holds whether we are talking about curriculum as a set of broad, measurable competencies (i.e., standards) or as a comprehensive set of resources for teaching and learning mathematics. Impacting practice in this way requires fine-grained research that is focused on individual student learning trajectories and intimate analyses of classroom pedagogical practices as well as large-scale research that explores how student populations typically engage with the big ideas of mathematics over time. Both types of research provide an empirical basis for identifying what aspects of mathematics are important and how they develop over time.

This book has its origins in independent but parallel work in Australia and the United States over the last 10 to 15 years. It was prompted by a research seminar at the 2017 PME Conference in Singapore that brought the contributors to this volume together to consider the development and use of evidence-based learning progressions/trajectories in mathematics education, their basis in theory, their focus and scale, and the methods used to identify and validate them. In this volume they elaborate on their work to consider what is meant by learning progressions/trajectories and explore a range of issues associated with their development, implementation, evaluation, and on-going review. Implications for curriculum design and future research in this field are also considered.

Contributors are: Michael Askew, Tasos Barkatsas, Michael Belcher, Rosemary Callingham, Doug Clements, Jere Confrey, Lorraine Day, Margaret Hennessey, Marj Horne, Alan Maloney, William McGowan, Greg Oates, Claudia Orellana, Julie Sarama, Rebecca Seah, Meetal Shah, Dianne Siemon, Max Stephens, Ron Tzur, and Jane Watson.
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STEM of Desire

Queer Theories and Science Education

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Edited by Will Letts and Steve Fifield

STEM of Desire: Queer Theories and Science Education locates, creates, and investigates intersections of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and queer theorizing. Manifold desires—personal, political, cultural—produce and animate STEM education. Queer theories instigate and explore (im)possibilities for knowing and being through desires normal and strange. The provocative original manuscripts in this collection draw on queer theories and allied perspectives to trace entanglements of STEM education, sex, sexuality, gender, and desire and to advance constructive critique, creative world-making, and (com)passionate advocacy. Not just another call for inclusion, this volume turns to what and how STEM education and diverse, desiring subjects might be(come) in relation to each other and the world.

STEM of Desire is the first book-length project on queering STEM education. Eighteen chapters and two poems by 27 contributors consider STEM education in schools and universities, museums and other informal learning environments, and everyday life. Subject areas include physical and life sciences, engineering, mathematics, nursing and medicine, environmental education, early childhood education, teacher education, and education standards. These queering orientations to theory, research, and practice will interest STEM teacher educators, teachers and professors, undergraduate and graduate students, scholars, policy makers, and academic libraries.

Contributors are: Jesse Bazzul, Charlotte Boulay, Francis S. Broadway, Erin A. Cech, Steve Fifield, blake m. r. flessas, Andrew Gilbert, Helene Götschel, Emily M. Gray, Kristin L. Gunckel, Joe E. Heimlich, Tommye Hutson, Kathryn L. Kirchgasler, Michelle L. Knaier, Sheri Leafgren, Will Letts, Anna MacDermut, Michael J. Reiss, Donna M. Riley, Cecilia Rodéhn, Scott Sander, Nicholas Santavicca, James Sheldon, Amy E. Slaton, Stephen Witzig, Timothy D. Zimmerman, and Adrian Zongrone.
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Critical Mathematics Education

Can Democratic Mathematics Education Survive under Neoliberal Regime?

Bülent Avcı

Drawing on rich ethnographic data, Critical Mathematics Education: Can Democratic Mathematics Education Survive under Neoliberal Regime? responds to ongoing discussions on the standardization in curriculum and reconceptualizes Critical Mathematics Education (CME) by arguing that despite obstructive implications of market-driven changes in education, a practice of critical mathematics education to promote critical citizenship could be implemented through open-ended projects that resonate with an inquiry-based collaborative learning and dialogic pedagogy. In doing so, neoliberal hegemony in education can be countered. The book also identifies certain limitations of critical mathematical education and suggests pedagogic and curricular strategies for critical educators to cope with these obstacles.
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Edited by Tasos Barkatsas, Nicky Carr and Grant Cooper

The second decade of the 21st century has seen governments and industry globally intensify their focus on the role of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as a vehicle for future economic prosperity. Economic opportunities for new industries that are emerging from technological advances, such as those emerging from the field of artificial intelligence also require greater capabilities in science, mathematics, engineering and technologies. In response to such opportunities and challenges, government policies that position STEM as a critical driver of economic prosperity have burgeoned in recent years. Common to all these policies are consistent messages that STEM related industries are the key to future international competitiveness, productivity and economic prosperity.
This book presents a contemporary focus on significant issues in STEM teaching, learning and research that are valuable in preparing students for a digital 21st century. The book chapters cover a wide spectrum of issues and topics using a wealth of research methodologies and methods ranging from STEM definitions to virtual reality in the classroom; multiplicative thinking; STEM in pre-school, primary, secondary and tertiary education, opportunities and obstacles in STEM; inquiry-based learning in statistics; values in STEM education and building academic leadership in STEM.
The book is an important representation of some of the work currently being done by research-active academics. It will appeal to academics, researchers, teacher educators, educational administrators, teachers and anyone interested in contemporary STEM Education related research in a rapidly changing globally interconnected world.

Contributors are: Natalie Banks, Anastasios (Tasos) Barkatsas, Amanda Berry, Lisa Borgerding, Nicky Carr, Io Keong Cheong, Grant Cooper, Jan van Driel, Jennifer Earle, Susan Fraser, Noleine Fitzallen, Tricia Forrester, Helen Georgiou, Andrew Gilbert, Ineke Henze, Linda Hobbs, Sarah Howard, Sylvia Sao Leng Ieong, Chunlian Jiang, Kathy Jordan, Belinda Kennedy, Zsolt Lavicza, Tricia Mclaughlin, Wendy Nielsen, Shalveena Prasad, Theodosia Prodromou, Wee Tiong Seah, Dianne Siemon, Li Ping Thong, Tessa E. Vossen and Marc J. de Vries.
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Tricia McLaughlin and Belinda Kennedy

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Whilst much of the emphasis upon stem in Australia has focussed upon the need for greater learning opportunities for students and emerging skill gaps, little attention has been directed towards the academic workforce and their capacity to deliver stem education in tertiary contexts. This chapter reports on a nationally funded Australian Government project in building capacity for academics from stem and other disciplines to engage in cross-disciplinary activities. Two of the national case studies are selected for discussion in this chapter. In these case studies, staff awareness and confidence in stem cross-disciplinary work increased, and their understanding of the value of such cross-disciplinary work for students also increased. These case studies provide one model of ensuring that academic leadership is at the forefront of stem learning in the future.

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Amanda Berry, Tricia McLaughlin and Grant Cooper

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This chapter reports a research project aimed to develop pre-service science teachers’ knowledge and understanding of contemporary stem contexts and pedagogies through participation in a stem mentoring initiative for schoolgirls. In this project, primary and secondary pre-service teachers (PSTs) volunteered to work as mentors, collaborating in the design of learning experiences suitable for school-aged girls, together with teacher educators and researchers in stem at an Australian University. Outcomes of the study focus on main themes of: PSTs’ self-perceptions as emerging stem educators, their understandings of stem and developing a pedagogy around stem, their understandings of school girls’ interest, engagement and learning in stem, and the value of the project for teachers in preparation.

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Jan H. van Driel, Tessa E. Vossen, Ineke Henze and Marc J. de Vries

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This chapter describes an approach to stem education that focuses on connecting research and design as core practices across the stem disciplines. In this approach, school-industry partnerships provide students with opportunities to acquire real world stem experiences. Collaboration between teachers, within and across schools, and with stem professionals working in local industries are an essential element in the implementation of this innovation. Consequently, schools and teachers are empowered to develop and implement a version of stem education that fits their local context, student population and resources. Research is needed to investigate the impact of this approach on the attitudes and behaviours of students, teachers and stem professionals.

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Grant Cooper and Li Ping Thong

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With the advancement of immersive virtual reality (VR) there are various possibilities with the introduction of these technologies. Preparing students to effectively navigate, contribute to, and participate in virtual environments appears to be an important set of stem-related competencies in the future. This chapter describes the VR Education Model (VEM), describing elements of this technology and its possible application in the classroom. One factor in student underachievement in stem subjects may be a heavy reliance upon textual representations at the expense of more visuo spatial representations. Therefore, the use of VR may be particularly beneficial when representing and learning about stem-related concepts. The authors envisage a number of scenarios that include but are not limited to the possibilities described in this chapter. The implementation of VR is discussed in terms of a broader stem vision that meets the unique needs and priorities of each school.

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Theodosia Prodromou and Zsolt Lavicza

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This chapter reports on the analysis of the unstructured interviews of mathematics teachers who reflected on the classroom discussions between researchers, teachers and middle school students who engaged in critical and creative thinking during solving complex and authentic problems that require students to make meanings of the data from Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (stem) disciplines; promote discussions to deepen their statistical understanding; and enhance productive classroom norms for statistical inquiries. Outcomes of this research study include identification and illustration of classroom norms for statistical inquiries and facilitate students’ inquiry-based statistical learning and teachers’ planning for inquiry learning.