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Advcance Student-Scientist Partnerschips beyond the Status Quo
Author: Pei-Ling Hsu
Working with scientists has been suggested as a powerful activity that can stimulate students’ interest and career aspirations in science. However, how to address challenges of power-over issues and communication barriers in youth-scientist partnerships? In Youths’ Cogenerative Dialogues with Scientists, the author describes a pioneering study to improve internship communications between youth and scientists through cogenerative dialogues. The findings show that cogenerative dialogues can help youth and scientists recognize, express, and manage their challenges and emotions as they arise in their internships. As a result, cogenerative dialogues help youth and scientists work productively as a team and enhance their social boding. Suggestions are also provided for science educators to design more innovative and effective projects for future youth-scientist partnerships.
Editors: Nagla Ali and Myint Swe Khine
Three dimensional or 3D printing technology is a process of making three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. Currently, low cost and affordable 3D printers enable teachers, schools, and higher education institutions to make 3D printing a part of the curriculum. Integrating 3D printing into the curriculum provides an opportunity for students to collaboratively discuss, design, and create 3D objects. The literature reveals that there are numerous advantages of integrating 3D printing into teaching and learning. Educators recommend that 3D printing should be introduced to the students at a young age to teach STEM concepts, develop creativity and engage in team work – essential skills for the 21st century work force.

This edited volume documents recent attempts to integrate 3D printing into the curriculum in schools and universities and research on its efficacies and usefulness from the practitioners' perspectives. It unveils the exemplary works by educators and researchers in the field highlighting the current trends, theoretical and practical aspects of 3D printing in teaching and learning.

Contributors are: Waleed K. Ahmed, Issah M. Alhamad, Hayder Z. Ali, Nagla Ali, Hamad AlJassmi,Jason Beach, Jennifer Buckingham, Michael Buckingham, Dean Cairns, Manisha Dayal, Muhammet Demirbilek, Yujiro Fujiwara, Anneliese Hulme, Myint Swe Khine, Lee Kenneth Jones, Jennifer Loy, Kehui Luo, Elena Novak, James I. Novak, Joshua Pearce, Dorothy Belle Poli, Chelsea Schelly, Min Jeong Song, Sylvia Stavridi, Lisa Stoneman, Goran Štrkalj, Mirjana Štrkalj, Pamela Sullivan, Jeremy Wendt, Stephanie Wendt, and Sonya Wisdom.
Why Science and Arts Creativities Matter is a ground-breaking text which significantly extends current understandings of STEAM and debates about individuation of disciplines vis-à-vis transdisciplinary theory. Drawing upon posthumanism, new materialism and enactivism, this collection of chapters aims to dwell further into the ways in which we come to know in relationship with the world. The text draws together a wide set of approaches and points of views to stimulate dialogue and awareness of the different ways in which we can extend the repertoire of human faculties for thinking and experiencing the world. A unique invitation is shared with readers to develop greater understanding of the contribution of education across the arts and sciences and to re-imagine our collective futures.

This book is a unique and timely volume that opens up several new lines of enquiry and arguments on STEAM education. It rebalances and readdresses the current emphasis in the literature around STEAM as another, newer opportunity to teach content. Instead, it brings a more specific focus on an entwining of contemporary theorists – putting theory to work – to extend the means for understanding and cultivating science and arts creativities, and make explicit key connections with the materiality of practices. This new go-to text offers a demonstration of how the latest research and theoretically engaged thinking (thinking through theory) on STEAM education can be put to work in practice.

Contributors are: Ramsey Affifi, Sofie Areljung, Chris Brownell, Pamela Burnard, Kerry Chappell, Laura Colucci-Gray, Carolyn Cooke, Kristóf Fenyvesi, Erik Fooladi, Cathy Francis, Lindsay Hetherington, Anna Hickey-Moody, Christine Horn, Tim Ingold, Riikka Kosola, Zsolt Lavicza, Elsa Lee, Saara Lehto, Danielle Lloyd, James Macallister, Caroline Maloney, Tessa Mcgavock, Karin Murris, Lena Nasiakou, Edvin Østergaard, Anne Pirrie, Hermione Ruck Keene, Ruth Sapsed, Diana Scherer, Pallawi Sinha, Margaret Somerville, Keiren Stephenson, Carine Steyn, Jan Van Boeckel, Nicola Walshe, Olivier Werner, Marissa Willcox, and Heather Wren.
Living Culturally Responsive Mathematics Education with/in Indigenous Communities explores challenges and possibilities across international contexts, involving Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars, teachers and Elders responding to calls for improved education for all Indigenous students. Authors from Australia, New Zealand, United States, Micronesia, and Canada explore the nature of culturally responsive mathematics education. Chapters highlight the importance of relationships with communities and the land, each engaging critically with ideas of culturally responsive education, exploring what this stance might mean and how it is lived in local contexts within global conversations. Education researchers and teacher educators will find a living pathway where scholars, educators, youth and community members critically take-up culturally responsive teachings and the possibilities and challenges that arise along the journey.

Contributors are: Dayle Anderson, Dora Andre-Ihrke, Jo-ann Archibald Q'um Q'um Xiiem, Maria Jose Athie-Martinez, Robin Averill, Trevor Bills, Beatriz A. Camacho, A. J. (Sandy) Dawson, Dwayne Donald, Herewini Easton, Tauvela Fale, Amanda Fritzlan, Florence Glanfield, Jodie Hunter, Roberta Hunter, Newell Margaret Johnson, Julie Kaomea, Robyn Jorgensen, Jerry Lipka, Lisa Lunney Borden, Dora Miura, Sharon Nelson-Barber, Cynthia Nicol, Gladys Sterenberg, Marama Taiwhati, Pania Te Maro, Jennifer S. Thom, David Wagner, Evelyn Yanez, and Joanne Yovanovich.

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of varied practical applications for 3D printing in the K-16 environment. These applications intertwine with and extend to teacher education in the university setting, impacting pre-service teachers and in-service teachers across disciplines. The concepts, successes, and failures also expand into the surrounding communities and regions to influence perceptions and initiatives. The activities and applications open minds and doors for career and education pathways that are enhanced by the endless creative possibilities and implementation of the process. Throughout the chapter, each concrete example will be followed by a broader impact and specific implementation that surpasses the lower levels of engagement often seen through simplified 3D printing activities. The information and resources are valuable to educators of all levels.

In: Integrating 3D Printing into Teaching and Learning

Abstract

This work puts a spotlight on utilizing 3D printing technologies in mechanical engineering education. Starting from elementary courses such as geometric modeling to the more advanced courses such as Fluid Mechanics and Mechanics of Materials.

The authors of this work have extensive experience in 3D printing technologies which allowed them to implement it in many aspects of their daily education process. The process starts from geometric modeling courses by teaching students the procedures needed to develop the 3D model(s) of the prototypes and successfully transfer them from the computer screen into real part(s). The same course also introduces the students to many types of technologies, applications, and hands-on experience in 3D printing equipment.

Advanced courses such as Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics allowed students to 3D print their prototypes and test it in the wind tunnel making use of the similarity approach where it mimics a real-world situation. Such models included basic shapes such as a disk or a sphere and more advanced models such as car models, truck models, aerofoils and wings.

It has been noticed, from experience and continuous practice, that students become more excited and enthusiastic when allowed to use 3D printing technologies freely in their course work. The process itself is novel and innovative, and many students are thrilled for being involved in this area. It is expected that in the near future, a dedicated course will be assigned for 3D printing and scanning technologies, especially in mechanical engineering education.

In: Integrating 3D Printing into Teaching and Learning
Author: Pamela Sullivan

Abstract

This chapter offers vignettes and examples of Makerspace activities to illuminate the considerations and decisions inherent in the integration of 3D printing into very early childhood classrooms. The benefits of STEM tasks such as 3D printing for even very young students are evident in the areas of intellectual growth (reasoning, hypothesizing, predicting, generation and reflection upon ideas), social skills (leadership, sharing), and play. However, as is the case with most cutting-edge technologies, teachers are being encouraged to use the tools before research-based lessons are widely available. Research-based lessons should specifically link the activities to positive instruction techniques. This chapter provides practical ideas, as well as an explanation linking the lessons to research supporting a whole-child, integrated approach to early childhood learning and development.

In: Integrating 3D Printing into Teaching and Learning

Abstract

3D prints have been increasingly used as substitutes for human tissue within medical and educational settings. Several studies demonstrated that anatomical structures could be 3D printed with the accuracy needed in anatomical education. These studies, however, focused mainly on the shape and did not take into account finer features such as texture and colour. This study aimed to investigate students’ test performance on real bones, commercial anatomical models and 3D prints produced on a desktop printer. A total of 211 students (divided into three groups) in a musculoskeletal anatomy course were asked to complete a practical test on vertebral anatomy. In the test, at each of the nine stations, a vertebra (real, model or 3D printed) was presented and students were asked to identify which vertebral region it belonged to, and a specific anatomical structure. The sequence of real, model and 3D printed bones presented along the stations was different for each group, to control for possible order effects. There were no significant differences in identifying vertebral regions or larger structures, such as transverse and spinous processes, across the three types of bones. However, significant difference was found in the identification of smaller structures, such as epiphyseal rim (p < 0.0005) and demifacets of thoracic vertebra (p < 0.05), with the highest percentage of correct answers for real bones, followed by 3D prints. The results suggest that students recognise anatomical structures equally well on real, model or 3D printed bones and that 3D prints are better than models for identifying smaller structures. This supports the view that some anatomical structures can be 3D printed with the accuracy required in anatomy education, even if produced on desktop printers.

In: Integrating 3D Printing into Teaching and Learning

Abstract

3D printing technologies based on an open source model offer a tool for distributed manufacturing and individual customization of printed goods, diminishing the environmental externalities associated with the global transport of goods, the production of goods based on raw material extraction, and production waste. They also make it possible to address issues of sustainable development and the environmental impacts of industrial development simultaneously via innovative STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) education, offering appropriate technologies for use in non-industrial locales. This chapter reports on a university course where students built their own 3D printers, used them to print items, learned about how 3D printers can help minimize the environmental externalities of production and address issues of environmental sustainability, and were introduced to social issues related to inequality of access to material goods. Students were asked to participate in a survey and a follow-up interview about their experience in the class. Results suggest that this course encouraged students to think about the environmental benefits of distributed manufacturing as well as about the human dimensions of sustainability-related to global inequalities of access to manufactured goods. The course also helped students feel like they could work to address environmental problems and social issues in their future engineering careers. Using 3D printing technologies in an active learning STEM education environment can engage engineering students with both the environmental and social issues that will shape the challenges they face as future industrial designers and manufacturers.

In: Integrating 3D Printing into Teaching and Learning

Abstract

Research findings reveal that teachers lack adequate preparation to integrate 3D printing technology into their classrooms. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the perception of the instructors and Emirati pre-service teachers on the integration of 3D printing into teaching and learning. The study also aims to identify issues and challenges faced during the implementation process, and proposing some fundamental recommendations to overcome these issues and challenges. This study implemented a pedagogical model in preparing the Emirati pre-service teachers through the merging of 3D printing in an integrated unit plan. The participants of the study were four Emirati pre-service teachers and two instructors who were involved in the integration of 3D printing process. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect the data. The results revealed that the Emirati pre-service teachers enjoyed the experience and they appreciated the pedagogy used to integrate 3D printing into teaching and learning. The findings, on the other hand, indicated that the pre-service teachers learned various knowledge and skills and they showed a strong intention to integrate 3D printing in their classrooms in the future. In addition, Emirati pre-service teachers and their instructors faced some challenges during the integration process such as time, lack of technical knowledge and skills, and inadequate training. The participants strongly recommended the integration of 3D printing in preparing future teachers and suggested different approaches to achieving this integration.

In: Integrating 3D Printing into Teaching and Learning