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Author: Nancy A. Wasser
“I just cannot write” or “I am not a good writer” are familiar complaints from students in academia. Many academic students claim they cannot express themselves clearly in written text, and their lack of this skill impedes them in their academic career. In this book, the author argues that teachers can help solve this when they start viewing writing not as secondary to reading, but as the equally important side of the same coin. Those who cannot read, will not be able to write.

The author explains how teaching and regular practicing of how to write from an early age onwards helps children grow into students who are self-aware of their voices. By employing narrative as a process of learning to write and a way to read, teachers can teach children the art of writing, while also making children more aware of their own constructions of narrative. Combining the focus on individual and group expression in writing lessons, students can trace and reflect on their own life transformations through their writing process.

Good writers are not born that way, but made through effort and practice. Changes in the U.S. curriculum may not only lead to better-expressed citizens, but also to a more equal society in which both teachers and children have a voice.
Author: Augie Fleras
The multiculturalization of Canada has catapulted it into the front ranks of countries in advancing a principled diversity governance. Fifty years after the inception of a multicultural governance model that seemingly works and is relatively popular, Canada remains one of the few countries in the world to believe in multiculturalism. Yet the irony is inescapable: Notwithstanding its lofty status as a Canadian icon and an aspirational ideal, an official multiculturalism remains misunderstood both in Canada and abroad in terms of what it means, how it works and for whom, and why it endures. If anything, as the book explains, the idea of multiculturalism remains shrouded in the conceptual fog of a ‘riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma’. An interplay of polite fictions that mask inconvenient truths puts the onus on deconstructing Canadian multiculturalism by conceptualizing strengths (including a probe into why multiculturalism ostensibly works in Canada but rarely elsewhere), analyzing weaknesses, critically assessing its worth, and envisioning its future in responding to the new realities and demands of a post-multicultural world. That Canada’s multiculturalism remains a work in progress, albeit one with innovative possibilities, provides a fitting tribute.
Author: J.E. Sumerau
Who am I? Where did I come from? What is a family? How do families of choice develop?

These questions permeate the pages of Scarecrow wherein a bisexual, nonbinary trans feminine person named Erin seeks to make sense of her life in relation to the places, people, and events she has seen and left behind over time. As the novel begins, Erin tells us that “39 funerals, 35 years, and too many lovers to bother remembering brought me to this point.” From this opening statement, Erin reflects on three-and-a-half decades of experiences growing up working class, white, and queer in the southeastern U.S.; navigating sexual, gender, classed, racial, and religious meanings and relationships; surviving varied types of love, trauma, kindness, and violence; and joining the upper-middle class world of the professoriate. As the novel progresses, she shows us how these experiences intertwine, create opportunities, and leave scars that together fashion who she has become over time and in relation to others.

Scarecrow could be utilized in the teaching of sociology, social psychology, Symbolic Interactionism, narrative, families, gender, sexualities, race, class, geography, biography, Southern Studies, LGBTQIA studies, trauma recovery, courses about aging and the life course, or of course, it could be read entirely for pleasure.
This book presents useful insights on the regeneration of curricula and pedagogies with a particular focus on universities in South Africa and Africa in general. Transformative Curricula, Pedagogies and Epistemologies: Teaching and Learning in Diverse Higher Education Contexts further explores the state of teaching and learning in different contexts, together with the emerging challenges and responsibilities that African higher education in the twenty first century is faced with. The analysis is put in light of the assumptions borrowed from the West, for Western epistemologies and pedagogies are still dominant. Instead, the book presents a case on the need for rethinking pedagogies and epistemologies within African higher education that include African culture, values, ethics, and indigenous knowledge. The new obligations of inclusive education, decolonisation, transformation, and academic and professional experiences are of paramount importance for contemporary higher education.

Valuable ideas about practices and policies in epistemological and pedagogical transformative mechanisms are discussed which can be used to inform a decolonised teaching and learning curriculum most suitable for an African higher education system. Above all, the book goes beyond mere narratives, as it explores decolonisation strategies suitable for transforming pedagogical and epistemological practices that include the education system as a whole.
Volume Editors: Annica Andersson and Richard Barwell
There is no shortage of urgent, complex problems that mathematics education can and should engage with. Pandemics, forest fires, pollution, Black Lives Matter protests, and fake news all involve mathematics, are matters of life and death, have a clear political dimension, and are interdisciplinary in nature. They demand a critical approach. The authors in this volume showcase new insights, teaching ideas and new and unique ways of applying critical mathematics education, in areas as diverse as climate change, obesity, decolonisation and ethnomathematics. This book demonstrates that there is plenty to be done with critical mathematics education.

Contributors are: Annica Andersson, Tonya Gau Bartell, Richard Barwell, Lisa Lunney Borden, Sunghwan Byun, Anna Chronaki, Brian Greer, Jennifer Hall, Victoria Hand, Kjellrun Hiis Hauge, Beth Herbel-Eisenmann, Rune Herheim, Courtney Koestler, Kate le Roux, Swapna Mukhopadhyay, Aldo Parra, Anita Rampal, Sheena Rughubar-Reddy, Toril Eskeland Rangnes, Ulrika Ryan, Lisa Steffensen, Paola Valero and David Wagner.
A Story of Quarantine and a Question of Conscience
Author: R. P. Clair
Buried Together: A Story of Quarantine and a Question of Conscience is a work of historical fiction based on the true story of Silas Mercer Beasley Jr., a Civil War conscientious objector. Silas Jr.’s brothers fought for both sides (Union and Confederacy) and a few questioned Silas’ courage. Following the war, he and his Union veteran brothers faced threats of death from local Southerners. Silas gathered his family and left Georgia in pursuit of his missing brothers and safety. All but Silas fell ill during this exodus due to the pandemic (i.e., smallpox, typhoid fever, measles). They sought refuge in a cabin in Tennessee where they quarantined through these troubling times. During their quarantine, Silas’ mother told the story of the Cherokee Removal and the infamous Kilakeena Elias Boudinot to help her son keep vigil so that he might protect the family from marauders. Surrounded by danger, Silas Jr. was faced with more than one life and death decision and more than one heart-breaking loss.

This historical novel speaks to contemporary issues. Based on archival documents and Silas Jr.’s published diary accounts of the Civil War times and beyond, readers learn of conscription, bi-racial families, and voter suppression. With respect to the Cherokee Removal, readers learn about the culture as depicted through the ethnographic work of James Mooney. They further learn of various Generals’ opposition to the Cherokee Removal and political strategies of Jackson and Van Buren. But more than this, readers learn of the life experiences of one family, and of one man; the heartbreak they endured and the resilience they displayed.
Developing Powerful Inclusive Narratives for Learning, Teaching, Research and Policy in Higher Education
Author: Sarah Hayes
This book challenges the notion that static principles of inclusive practice can be embedded and measured in Higher Education. It introduces the original concept of postdigital positionality as a dynamic lens through which inclusivity policies in universities might be reimagined. Much is written about Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) based on an assumption that such principles are already ‘established’ in educational institutions, to ensure fairness and opportunity for all. In this book, readers are asked: what does an airing cupboard have in common with ‘cancel culture’? This opens a provocative debate concerning the disconnect between EDI policy agendas and the widespread digitalisation of society. Written as Covid-19 has converged with existing political economic spaces of technology, culture, data and digital poverty, Postdigital Positionality calls for more ecologically sustainable inclusivity policies.
What We Say and Do Matters
Volume Editors: Katia González and Rhoda Frumkin
The ability of educators to provide a nurturing environment to support students’ cognitive, social-emotional, and physical well-being can impact not only the classroom as a learning space but may also have a long lasting effect on children and families. Educators are seeking ways to become better informed on how trauma can affect learners, individually and as a group, while also searching for evidence based practices to support pedagogical decision-making. This book provides readers with the opportunity to critically reflect upon ways research connects to practice while considering how stressors can be minimized to support students. A special section related to educators’ personal and professional growth is also included.
This book addresses the conceptualization and practice of Indigenous research methodologies especially in Sámi and North European academic contexts. It examines the meaning of Sámi research and research methodologies, practical levels of doing Indigenous research today in different contexts, as well as global debates in Indigenous research. The contributors present place-specific and relational Sámi research approaches as well as reciprocal methodological choices in Indigenous research in North-South relationships. This edited volume is a result of a research collaboration in four countries where Sámi people live. By taking the readers to diverse local discussions, the collection emphasizes communal responsibility and care as a key in doing Indigenous research.

Contributors are: Rauni Äärelä-Vihriälä, Hanna Guttorm, Lea Kantonen, Pigga Keskitalo, Ilona Kivinen, Britt Kramvig, Petter Morottaja, Eljas Niskanen, Torjer Olsen, Marja-Liisa Olthuis, Hanna Outakoski, Attila Paksi, Jelena Porsanger, Aili Pyhälä, Rauna Rahko-Ravantti, Torkel Rasmussen, Erika Katjaana Sarivaara, Irja Seurujärvi-Kari, Trond Trosterud and Pirjo Kristiina Virtanen.
Volume Editors: Bronislaw Czarnocha and William Baker
Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education introduces bisociation, the theory of Aha! moment creativity into mathematics education. It establishes relationships between Koestler’s bisociation theory and constructivist learning theories. It lays down the basis for a new theory integrating creativity with learning to describe moments of insight at different levels of student development. The collection illuminates the creativity of the eureka experience in mathematics through different lenses of affect, cognition and conation, theory of attention and constructivist theories of learning, neuroscience and computer creativity. Since Aha! is a common human experience, the book proposes bisociation as the basis of creativity for all. It discusses how to facilitate and assess Aha! creativity in mathematics classrooms.

Contributors are: William Baker, Stephen Campbell, Bronislaw Czarnocha, Olen Dias, Gerald Goldin, Peter Liljedahl, John Mason, Benjamin Rott, Edme Soho, Hector Soto, Hannes Stoppel, David Tall, Ron Tzur and Laurel Wolf.