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Challenges and Directions in a Multicultural World
This book intends to find a common path for diverse approaches meant to reach a better vision on the future of education, to adapt it to the most spectacular and rapid changes in the modern world. Remarkable education specialists bring their research into this volume that collects the best ideas and solutions presented in the 19th Biennial Conference of the International Study Association on Teachers and Teaching (Sibiu, Romania, July 2019). The 17 chapters of this book promote a hopeful vision on the future of education as proclaimed in the title: Education beyond Crisis: Challenges and Directions in a Multicultural World.

The volume focuses on three major ideas: defining directions for the future of teaching, challenges of the contemporary teaching context, and teaching in a multicultural world. The volume itself stands for the multicultural approach of education, as the contributors propose a unitary picture on education, in the contexts of national educative programs or inclusive education for the refugee children.

Well-known researchers answer important questions on the effectiveness of educational reforms and education policies in different countries. They take into account the student voice or the teachers' opinions in teaching and designing the new curriculum. The volume includes researches based on case studies, interviews, surveys, qualitative analysis, and original researching instruments. Readers will find here not only the vision of a multicultural world, but also valuable ideas on education in Austria, Brazil, Canada, Portugal, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Serbia, Spain, Singapore, Romania, Turkey, and the United States.

Contributors are: Christiana Deliewen Afrikaner, Laura Sara Agrati, Ana Flavia Souza Aquiar, Neelofar Ahmed, Douwe Beijaard, Terence Titus Chia, Cheryl J. Craig, Feyza Doyran, Estela Ene, Maria Assunção Flores, Maria Antonella Galanti, Paula Martín Gómez, Christos Govaris, Heng Jiang, Stavroula Kaldi, Ria George Kallumkal, Manpreet Kaur, Julia Köhler, Malathy Krishnasamy, Virginia Grazia Iris Magoga, Maria Ines Marcondes, Paulien C. Meijer, Juanjo Mena, Raluca Muresan, Ingeborg van der Neut, Ida E. Oosterheert, Darlene Ciuffetelli Parker, Loredana Perla, Cui Ping, Snežana Obradović-Ratković, Maria Luisa Garcia Rodriquez, Minodora Salcudean, Gonny Schellings, Antonis Smyrnaios, Sydney Sparks, Alexandra Stavrianoudaki, Vassiliki Tzika, Evgenia Vassilaki, Viviana Vinci, Kari-Lynn Winters, Vera E. Woloshyn, Tamara Zappaterra, and Gang Zhu.
Stories from the Field – Resolving Educational Leadership Dilemmas
In You Can’t Make This Up! the author invites both emerging educational leaders and practicing school administrators to read a series of short stories recounted by principals and vice principals employed in schools across the United States, in Germany and Cyprus. This collection of present-day stories highlights the types of challenges school leaders encounter on a daily basis, all of which demand informed decisions, but none of which are easily resolved.

Each story is presented in a case study format, and aligned with selected elements within one of the ten Professional Standards for Educational Leadership (PSEL). At a critical juncture in each case, a series of “questions to ponder” is presented, followed by a segment describing “what actually occurred?”
Arts education research in Canada has increased significantly since the beginning of this century. New forms of arts-based research, such as ethnodrama and a/r/t/ography, have arisen and made significant contributions to the literature. Researchers in departments/schools/faculties of dance, drama, music, visual arts, media studies, cultural studies and education have been successful in acquiring peer-reviewed grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council to undertake large-scale projects and disseminate the findings internationally. The purpose of this edited collection, entitled Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2: Issues and Directions, is to provide an overview of the current research undertaken across the country, thereby providing a valuable resource for students, professors and research associates working in the arts disciplines, media studies, education, and cultural studies.

Contributors are: Bernard W. Andrews, Kathy Browning, Ranya Essmat Saad, Maia Giesbrecht, Shelley M. Griffin, Rita Irwin, Glenys McQueen-Fuentes, Laura Nemoy, Lori Lynn Penny, Jennifer Roswell, Michelle Searle, Alison Shields, Anita Sinner, Darlene St. Georges, Peter Vietgen, John L. Vitale, Jennifer Wicks, Kari-Lynn Winters, and Thibault Zimmer.
Authors: Alison Shields and Rita Irwin

Abstract

Upon reviewing eleven dissertations completed during the last decade (2006–2016) in The University of British Columbia’s art education program, this chapter addresses the following questions: (1) What are the qualities of art making and how does art making function within arts-based research?; (2) How is art making used to investigate educational issues?; and (3) How is art making reflected in the dissertation structure? This chapter posits that arts-based research is uniquely situated within qualitative research, calling scholars to reflexively and reflectively consider their relations to artistic forms of inquiry. In looking forward, we anticipate PhD research will continue to provoke the boundaries of research leading to new forms of engagement and enhanced understandings of educational phenomena.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2

Abstract

This inquiry examined teacher perspectives on artist involvement in an integrated arts professional development program for elementary and secondary practitioners. Findings indicate that engagement in cross-curricular activities with professional artists employing a constructivist approach fostered a change in teacher beliefs about arts pedagogy. The participants indicated a preference for an integrated approach to arts instruction rather than the traditional, differentiated model which emphasizes separate arts disciplines. Teachers reported that the artists’ focus on personal creativity developed their innate artistic abilities. This enabled them to understand their students’ arts experiences and value diversity in learning. The offering of the program in Canada’s national cultural venues motivated the teachers to learn, stimulated their creativity, contextualized the learning, and instilled a sense of purpose for arts education. The integrated arts approach promoted the teachers’ cognitive and emotional development, enabled them to explore independent, self-directed learnings, fostered awareness of the interconnectedness of arts forms, and reinforced cross-curricular instruction through the arts. Such findings suggest that professional artists helping teachers to learn to teach the arts on-site through an integrated arts approach is a viable model of teacher development for improving arts instruction.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2

Abstract

Our chapter unfolds as a métissage of five distinct research strands in art education where we weave together visual and literary expressions in what is often called the intimate practice of life writing. Stories open spaces to consider when is research, as a gesture that shifts thinking to movements, and to stories as sources of information that offer aesthetic, experiential, embodied, intellectual and emotional ways of knowing. In this conversation, the application of stories as a method of inquiry begins with our first strand, which questions whose voices and bodies need to be considered in curricular encounters during workshops conducted at the Heeum Comfort Women Museum in South Korea. In this case, art-making actions and dialogues raise questions about historical and cultural hegemonic practices. Questions of indigenous identity are then advanced in a self-study about in-between social and cultural boundaries that asks, “How indigenous am I?” and “Who gets to decide?” Proceeding to curricular intensities we turn our attention to differences, and visual life writing with photography to explore the diaspora of Egyptian Jews in Canada. Turning to just and caring notions of learning and teaching, the stories of ‘at-risk’ students in an inner-city high school in Montreal emerge as integral to visual art practice. Our final exemplar of storying research materialises as collaborative a/r/tography, where social fiction and multisensory art production maps transatlantic familial maritime histories. We braid our reflective vignettes from each individual research story to demonstrate the application of stories as part of our ongoing conceptualization of practice through creative expression. Our research stories are introduced as pedagogic pivots, demonstrating how stories operate as a vernacular method that is an accessible, artful form of expression.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2
Author: Laura Nemoy

Abstract

Arts and humanities programming is becoming increasingly incorporated in the medical school, balancing the biomedical paradigm, and nurturing human and emotional qualities and understandings in medical students. Music is often listed among these arts and humanities disciplines; yet there exists an acknowledged gap in the literature pertaining to musical activities and programming in the medical school, despite the prevalence of choirs, a cappella groups, small instrumental ensembles, and musical theatre programs in medical schools. This chapter presents an overview of the landscape of music research in medical education, beginning with a background and description of the medical humanities concept, followed by a summary of the representation of music in medical humanities and medical education literature. The chapter concludes with a brief discussion and suggestions for areas of future research. Within the medical humanities, music has been tied to metaphors of “medicine as a performing art” or “the art of listening,” but very little literature exists delving into the actual musical experiences of medical students. Literature on choirs, musical ensemble, and community music suggests that choral singing can cultivate many of the intra and interpersonal skills that medical humanities programming encourages, such as empathy, self-awareness, human connection, and wellness. With the prevalence and accessibility of music groups (in particular vocal ensembles) in medical schools, it is viable and important to demonstrate through continued research that the value of music in medical education extends beyond metaphor and therapy, and suggests profound potential in shaping the becoming of compassionate physicians.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2

Abstract

This chapter, which outlines four arts education research studies in the Niagara region of Southern Ontario, explores interactions between artistry, communities with diverse learners, social inclusion, positioning, and literacy. Using a case illustration approach with vignettes (alongside a zone metaphor), the authors show how learners with diverse needs (e.g., behavioural, cognitive, linguistic) utilize the arts to zone-in, becoming productive members of the group. Moreover, students demonstrate how to get out-of-zones of stereotyped marginalization, in which they are occasionally positioned. Findings demonstrate that, when using arts zones, all children (including those with diverse needs) have authentic opportunities to transform perceptions, express unique perspectives, and re-position themselves as valued members of the community.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2
Author: Michelle Searle

Abstract

Educators experiment with new initiatives aimed at enhancing student learning. Ideally, these initiatives are grounded in educational research, and their implementation and impact are evaluated. Interweaving arts-informed inquiry into program evaluation provides an opportunity to build on to existing systematic processes while focusing on two purposes of evaluation: learning and improvement. When arts-informed inquiry is part of an ongoing process of collaborative evaluation, interesting and unexpected learning and engagement can happen. The results of this learning and engagement include stronger relationships within and beyond organizations, and the development of individual and organizational capacity for evaluative thinking. Importantly, arts-informed inquiry leads to enhanced usefulness of evaluation processes in educational decision-making. This chapter is an exploration of the value of arts-informed inquiry in educational program evaluation. It aims to provoke a discussion of the purpose, value, and challenges of educational program evaluations that incorporate artistry. First, a brief historical overview of the field of evaluation situates the use of collaborative approaches. These approaches use a range of methodologies and provide processes for interweaving artistic forms of data. Different perspectives of arts and evaluation are then discussed, following by a look at three educational program evaluations that included different types of arts-informed inquiry. The principles of arts-informed inquiry provide a framework for examining the value of arts-informed processes and products in educational evaluations. Benefits of infusing arts-informed inquiry in program evaluation are discussed and suggestions for future research are identified.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2
Author: John L. Vitale

Abstract

This study explores the attitudes and perspectives of elementary generalist teachers who have self-identified as having a fear of taking a music education course and a fear of teaching music. Participants include 20 pre-service generalists who (a) described their fears of teaching music and (b) provided a rationale for these fears through a 2-page written journal reflection. A typical qualitative analysis revealed that participants collectively generated 5 themes, namely: (a) inadequacy, (b) embarrassment, (c) stress, (d) past experiences, and (e) future time deficit. Through an arts-based methodology, I have chosen to present and discuss the findings through an authentic screenplay. This fictional narrative (entitled Facing The Music) is about 3 primary school teacher candidates (Melody, Viola, and Cadence), and their music education professor (Dr. Basso). In sum, all 3 teacher candidates have had uneventful musical experiences and feel ill-prepared and fearful of teaching music, while the professor attempts to makes sense of what his students are thinking and feeling. This study has practical implications for many stakeholders including pre/in-service generalists, music specialists, and administrators at all levels. Most importantly, the screenplay format allows stakeholders to easily process the findings in an appealing and resonant format that easily lends itself to further discussion, learning, and meaning-making, ultimately revealing the intrinsic value and significance of arts-based methodologies.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2