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Who Look at Me?!

Shifting the Gaze of Education through Blackness, Queerness, and the Body

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Durell M. Callier and Dominique C. Hill

Continuing the work of June Jordan and Langston Hughes, Who Look at Me?!: Shifting the Gaze of Education through Blackness, Queerness, and the Body questions how we, as a society, see Blackness and in particular Black youth. Taking up questions of sight, seeing, and the negation of seeing the Black, queer body in education, this book analyzes the impact of these views. Based on the work of a Black queer collective, Hill L. Waters, Who Look at Me?! provides alternative tools for reading about and engaging with the lived experiences of Black youth and educational research for and about Black youth. Drawing on the creative arts and narrative this book presents the possibilities of envisioning teaching and research practices that embrace, celebrate, and make room for the fullness of Black and queer bodies and experiences. This book can be used as a springboard for discussion and reflection in a range of courses in art education, education, critical race studies, and the social sciences. It can also be read by anyone interested in learning about Black youth.
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Kimberly Dark

The Daddies is a love letter to masculinity, a kaleidoscope of its pleasures and horrors. The question “Who’s your Daddy?” started showing up in mainstream cultural references during the 1990s. Those words can be spoken as a question, or a challenge, as a flirtation, a joke, or a threat. It’s all about inflection, intention, and who’s asking. Apparently, we have so much shared cultural meaning about “Daddy” the speakers and listeners can simply intuit meaning and proceed to laugh at the joke, or experience the shame, as appropriate. But who is Daddy in American culture? The Daddies aims to find out more than who – but how the process of knowing Daddy can prompt readers to know themselves and their society. This allegory about patriarchy unfolds as a kinky lesbian Daddy/girl love story. Daddy-ness is situated in all people, after all, and we each share responsibility for creating a fairer world. The Daddies can be used as a springboard for discussion in courses in sociology, gender and women's studies, cultural studies, sexuality studies and communication. As a work of fiction, The Daddies can also be enjoyed by general audiences.
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Academic Growth in Higher Education

Questions and Answers

Edited by Helena Pedrosa-de-Jesus and Mike Watts

Many changes in higher education have derived from Europe-wide initiatives such as the Bologna process, and have given increasing attention to student-centred learning and teaching approaches, allied to growth in teachers’ scholarship and academic development. Academic Growth in Higher Education: Questions and Answers centers around a decade-long research project, which is one component of a long-standing programme focused on ways to promote academic development and scholarship in higher education.

The purpose of the book is to highlight debates and issues important in teaching and learning at the tertiary level in universities, colleges and schools – exploring issues that teachers and lecturers will need to address throughout their professional lives. These issues surround acts of student-centred learning, inquiry-based learning, teachers’ own practices in the classroom and, every bit as significant, the activities generated by their students in the process of learning. The intention is to identify some of the debates relevant to teaching and learning, to challenge some of the orthodoxies within traditional forms of teaching and learning, and to suggest some solutions though current practice over a wide context of activity.
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Fostering a Relational Pedagogy

Self-Study as Transformative Praxis

Edited by Ellyn Lyle

It has long been established that teaching and learning are autobiographical endeavours, so it follows that self-study is central to sound practice. As a framework, self-study allows researchers to use their experiences to examine self-in-practice with the aim of both personal and professional growth. By its very design, it makes transparent personal processes of inquiry by offering them up for public critique. This type of public inquiry of the personal happens in at least two ways: first, through the inclusion of trusted others who can provide different perspectives on our closely held discourses; and, second, through making our research publicly available so that others might learn from our inquiries. Self-study, then, requires openness to vulnerability as we continuously re/negotiate who we are as teachers. Approaching inquiry from this perspective has at its core deepened self-knowledge coupled with intent to transform praxis. This transformation is sought through integrated ways of being and teaching that support embodied wholeness of teachers and learners. Through critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches, this collection seeks to advance teacher self-study and, through it, transformative praxis.

Contributors are: Willow S. Allen, Charity Becker, Yue Bian, Abby Boehm-Turner, Diane Burt, Vy Dao, Lee C. Fisher, Teresa Anne Fowler, Deborah Graham, Cher Hill, Chinwe H. Ikpeze, David Jardine, Elizabeth Kenyon, Jodi Latremouille, Carl Leggo, Ellyn Lyle, Sepideh Mahani, Jennifer Markides, Sherry Martens, Kate McCabe, Laura Piersol, Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan, Amanda C. Shopa, Timothy Sibbald, Sara K. Sterner, and Aaron Zimmerman.
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Edited by Peter Duffy, Christine Hatton and Richard Sallis

At a time when universities demand immediate and quantifiable impacts of scholarship, the voices of research participants become secondary to impact factors and the volume of research produced. Moreover, what counts as research within the academy constrains practices and methods that may more authentically articulate the phenomena being studied. When external forces limit methodological practices, research innovation slows and homogenizes.

This book aims to address the methodological, interpretive, ethical/procedural challenges and tensions within theatre-based research with a goal of elevating our field’s research practice and inquiry. Each chapter embraces various methodologies, positionalities and examples of mediation by inviting two or more leading researchers to interrogated each other’s work and, in so doing, highlighted current debates and practices in theatre-based research. Topics include: ethics, method, audience, purpose, mediation, form, aesthetics, voice, data generation, and research participants. Each chapter frames a critical dialogue between researchers that take multiple forms (dialogic interlude, research conversation, dramatic narrative, duologue, poetic exchange, etc.).

Drama Research Methods fills a gap in the field in that it is the first theatre-based research book to provide a rigorous critique of the research genre. Some of the field’s leading researchers administer self-critiques of their and their co-author’s work. They focus on innovative uses of drama/theatre research methods and the challenges they present for researchers and research participants alike.

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David W. Jardine

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The Negotiated Self

Employing Reflexive Inquiry to Explore Teacher Identity

Edited by Ellyn Lyle

Teacher identity resides in the foundational beliefs and assumptions educators have about teaching and learning. These beliefs and assumptions develop both inside and outside of the classroom, blurring the lines between the professional and the personal. Examining the development of teacher identity at this intersection requires a unique reflexive capacity.

Reflexive inquiry is both established and continually emerging. At its most basic, reflexivity refers to researchers’ consciousness of their role in and effect on both the act of doing research and arriving at research findings. In making central the role of the researcher in the research process, reflexive inquiry interrogates agency while examining philosophical notions about the nature of knowledge.

While advancements have been made in investigating the relationship between teacher knowledge and teacher practice, the research often fails to connect this meaning with self-knowledge and issues of identity. Through a consideration of these tenets, the authors in this collection embrace critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches to examine ways that reflexive inquiry supports studies in teacher identity. Moving between theory and lived experience, the authors individually and collectively lay bare teacher identity as negotiated while evidencing the epistemological merits of reflexive inquiry.