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The book discusses the history and the archaeology of Jerusalem in the Roman period (70-400 CE) following a chronological order, from the establishment of the Tenth Roman Legion’s camp on the ruins of Jerusalem in 70 CE, through the foundation of Aelia Capitolina by Hadrian, in around 130 CE, and the Christianization of the population and the cityscape in the fourth century. Cemeteries around the city, the rural hinterland, and the imperial roads that led to and from Aelia Capitolina are discussed as well. Due to the paucity of historical sources, the book is based on archaeological remains, suggesting a reconstruction of the city's development and a discussion of the population’s identity.
In: Aelia Capitolina – Jerusalem in the Roman Period
In: Aelia Capitolina – Jerusalem in the Roman Period
In: Aelia Capitolina – Jerusalem in the Roman Period
In: Aelia Capitolina – Jerusalem in the Roman Period
In: Aelia Capitolina – Jerusalem in the Roman Period
In: Aelia Capitolina – Jerusalem in the Roman Period
In: Aelia Capitolina – Jerusalem in the Roman Period
In: Aelia Capitolina – Jerusalem in the Roman Period
Some Studies of Its Topography, History, Cults and Myths
This is the concluding volume presenting results of the author’s fieldwork spread over more than fifty years concerning the Archaeology and Topography of Ancient Boiotia that includes also discussions of the distribution within the topography of certain ancient cults, especially those of Artemis, Herakles and the Horseman Hero. Within the more purely topographic section there is much discussion of regional defense systems, all set against the history of the Boiotian League, especially its early coinage, its origins and its confrontation with Sparta and the pivotal battle of Leuktra.