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The Concept of Vanished Technologies and Other Human Histories
Lost Knowledge: The Concept of Vanished Technologies and Other Human Histories examines the idea of lost knowledge, reaching back to a period between myth and history. It investigates a peculiar idea found in a number of early texts: that there were civilizations with knowledge of sophisticated technologies, and that this knowledge was obscured or destroyed over time along with the civilization that had created it. This book presents critical studies of a series of early Chinese, South Asian, and other texts that look at the idea of specific “lost” technologies, such as mechanical flight and the transmission of images. There is also an examination of why concepts of a vanished “golden age” were prevalent in so many cultures. Offering an engaging and investigative look at the propagation of history and myth in technology and culture, this book is sure to interest historians and readers from many backgrounds.
Quakers and Native Americans examines the history of interactions between Quakers and Native Americans (American Indians). Fourteen scholarly essays cover the period from the 1650s to the twentieth century. American Indians often guided the Quakers by word and example, demanding that they give content to their celebrated commitment to peace. As a consequence, the Quakers’ relations with American Indians has helped define their sense of mission and propelled their rise to influence in the U.S. Quakers have influenced Native American history as colonists, government advisors, and educators, eventually promoting boarding schools, assimilation and the suppression of indigenous cultures. The final two essays in this collection provide Quaker and American Indian perspectives on this history, bringing the story up to the present day.

Contributors include: Ray Batchelor, Lori Daggar, John Echohawk, Stephanie Gamble, Lawrence M. Hauptman, Allison Hrabar, Thomas J. Lappas, Carol Nackenoff, Paula Palmer, Ellen M. Ross, Jean R. Soderlund, Mary Beth Start, Tara Strauch, Marie Balsley Taylor, Elizabeth Thompson, and Scott M. Wert.
The Gēr and Mutable Ethnicity
Converts in the Dead Sea Scrolls examines the meaning of the term gēr in the Dead Sea Scrolls. While often interpreted as a resident alien, this study of the term as it is employed within scriptural rewriting in the Dead Sea Scrolls concludes that the gēr is a Gentile convert to Judaism. Contrasting the gēr in the Dead Sea Scrolls against scriptural predecessors, Carmen Palmer finds that a conversion is possible by means of mutable ethnicity. Furthermore, mutable features of ethnicity in the sectarian movement affiliated with the Dead Sea Scrolls include shared kinship, connection to land, and common culture in the practice of circumcision. The sectarian movement is not as closed toward Gentiles as has been commonly considered.
An Historical and Medical Approach to Political Thinking
In Machiavelli on Freedom and Civil Conflict: An Historical and Medical Approach to Political Thinking, Marie Gaille rethinks Machiavelli’s conception of civil conflict. In complete opposition to the common view of Machiavelli as a defender of tyranny, this analysis brings new elements to the forefront: the use of medical metaphors to describe the body politic, its historical lifespan and its institutional arrangement. This study is also based on a comprehensive approach to Machiavelli’s writings, including his most famous works, but also The History of Florence, his correspondence, and his political, military and diplomatic reports. This study allows Marie Gaille to propose an original assessment of Machiavelli’s insights for contemporary conceptions of democracy.

This is a revised and translated edition of Conflit Civil et Liberté: la Politique Machiavelienne entre Histoire et Médecine, first published in French, in 2004 by Éditions Honoré Champion.
Editor: Emily Varto
The chapters in Brill’s Companion to Classics and Early Anthropology explore key points of interaction between classics and anthropology from the eighteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Ancient Greece and Rome played varying roles in early anthropological thinking, from the observations of colonial officials and missionaries, through the ethnography and evolutionary ethnology of the late nineteenth century, and into the professionalized social sciences of the twentieth century. The chapters illuminate these roles and uncover an intellectual history of fission and fusion, exposing common interests and opposing methodologies, shared theories and conflicting datasets, close collaborations and adversarial estrangements. In augmenting and reevaluating this history, the volume offers a new and nuanced picture of the early formative relationship between the two disciplines.
La Phrygie Parorée et la Pisidie septentrionale deals with the history, the historical geography and the cultural sociology of Phrygia Paroreios and Northern Pisidia during the Hellenistic and Roman periods (IVth cent. BC – IVth cent. AD). This region of inner Anatolia, mostly inhabited by Pisidians and Phrygians, faced gradually the settlement of Greek, Macedonian, Jewish, Thracian, Lycian and Roman colonists who deeply modified the local cultures and geopolitics. With an approach based on epigraphic, archaeological, literary and numismatic sources, this work is the first historical synthesis devoted to a region showing strong cultural identities, which makes it essential to the understanding of the Graeco-Roman East.

La Phrygie Parorée et la Pisidie septentrionale traite de l’Histoire, de la géographie historique et de la sociologie culturelle de la Phrygie Parorée et du Nord de la Pisidie aux époques hellénistique et romaine (IVe s. av. J.-C.-IVe s. ap. J.-C.). Cette région de l’Anatolie intérieure, surtout peuplée par les Pisidiens et les Phrygiens, eut successivement à faire face à l’installation de colons grecs, macédoniens, juifs, thraces, lyciens et romains qui modifièrent en profondeur les cultures et la géopolitique locales. Grâce à une approche fondée sur l’examen des sources épigraphiques, archéologiques, littéraires et numismatiques, cet ouvrage constitue la première synthèse historique sur une région aux identités culturelles marquées, essentielle à la compréhension de l’Orient gréco-romain.
In: Fitful Histories and Unruly Publics: Rethinking Temporality and Community in Eurasian Archaeology
In: Fitful Histories and Unruly Publics: Rethinking Temporality and Community in Eurasian Archaeology
In: Fitful Histories and Unruly Publics: Rethinking Temporality and Community in Eurasian Archaeology