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The Egyptian caricature is generally studied as part of Egyptian mass culture, and mainly discussed in the context of Egypt's anti-colonial resistance to British foreign rule, as part of the forging of a “national style". In Cartooning for a Modern Egypt, Keren Zdafee foregrounds the role that Egypt’s foreign-local entrepreneurs and caricaturists played in formulating and constructing the modern Egyptian caricature of the interwar years, that was designated for, and reflected, a colonial and cosmopolitan culture of a few. Keren Zdafee illustrates how Egyptian foreign-local caricaturists envisioned and evaluated the past, present, and future of Egyptian society, in the context of Cairo's colonial cosmopolitanism, by adopting a theoretical, semiotic, and historical approach.
Les fouilles UCL/INSAP, 2000-2005
Le site archéologique le plus visité au Maroc, Volubilis est connu depuis longtemps pour ses mosaïques spectaculaires. Ce livre traite de ce qui est arrivé à la ville après le retrait de l'administration romaine à la fin du troisième siècle. Les fouilles publiées ici montrent comment la ville a continué à survivre jusqu'au cinquième siècle, avec des maisons d'élite commandant encore des mosaïques élégantes, et comment cette occupation a pris fin dans un séisme brutal. La ville renaît au sixième siècle avec de nouveaux occupants, la tribu berbère des Awraba. Au VIIIe siècle, il devint le siège de l'homme qui unit la plus grande partie du Maroc à la tête de l'Awraba, Idris I, descendant du prophète Mahomet.

The most-visited archaeological site in Morocco, Volubilis has long been known for its spectacular mosaics. Instead, this book deals with what happened to the town after the Roman administration was withdrawn at the end of the third century. The excavations published here show how the town continued to survive into the fifth century, with élite houses still commissioning elegant and witty mosaics, and how this occupation came to an end in a brutal earthquake. The town revived in the sixth century with new occupants, the Berber Awraba tribe. In the eighth century, it became the headquarters of the man who united most of Morocco at the head of the Awraba, Idris I, a descendant of the prophet Mohammed.

Contributeurs/Contributors: Ali Aït Kaci, Victoria Amoros-Ruiz, Mustafa Atki, Amira K. Bennison, Helen Dawson, Fatima-Zohra El-Harrif, Hafsa El Hassani, Abdallah Fili, Dorian Fuller, Guy Hunt, Anthony King, Tarik Moujoud, Gaetano Palumbo, Ruth Pelling, Susan Walker, Mark Wilson Jones.
The Building of Mosques in Early Medieval Syria
In his book In the Shadow of the Church: The Building of Mosques in Early Medieval Syria Mattia Guidetti examines the establishment of Muslim religious architecture within the Christian context in which it first appeared in the Syrian region, contributing to the debate on the transformation of late antique society to a Muslim one. He scrutinizes the slow process of conversion to Islam of the most important town centers by looking at religious places of both communities between the seventh and the eleventh century. The author assesses the relevancy of churches by analyzing the location of mosques and by researching phenomena of transfer of marble material from churches to mosques.
Syria's Monuments: their Survival and Destruction examines the fate of the various monuments in Syria (including present-day Lebanon, Jordan and Palestine/Israel) from Late Antiquity to the fall of the Ottoman Empire in the early 20th century. It examines travellers’ accounts, mainly from the 17th to 19th centuries, which describe religious buildings and housing in numbers and quality unknown elsewhere. The book charts the reasons why monuments lived or died, varying from earthquakes and desertification to neglect and re-use, and sets the political and social context for the Empire’s transformation toward a modern state, provoked by Western trade and example. An epilogue assesses the impact of the recent civil war on the state of the monuments, and strategies for their resurrection, with plentiful references and web links.
Through its material remains, Perspectives on Early Islamic Art in Jerusalem analyzes several overlooked aspects of the earliest decades of Islamic presence in Jerusalem, during the seventh century CE. Focusing on the Haram al-Sharif, also known as the Temple Mount, Lawrence Nees provides the first sustained study of the Dome of the Chain, a remarkable eleven-sided building standing beside the slightly later Dome of the Rock, and the first study of the meaning of the columns and column capitals with figures of eagles in the Dome of the Rock. He also provides a new interpretation of the earliest mosque in Jerusalem, the Haram as a whole, with the sacred Rock at its center.
In: Field Methods and Post-Excavation Techniques in Late Antique Archaeology
In: Local Economies?

Abstract

Using ceramic evidence, this paper examines the differences between the supply of coastal and inland regions of Africa from the 4th to 7th c. A.D. While a narrow band of coastline across the Mediterranean seems to be fully integrated into a common system of consumption (e.g. importing overseas amphora and the principal African Red Slip (ARS) forms), most of the inland regions seem to be more impervious to non-regional products (e.g. no transport amphorae and mainly local ARS); this is a situation which is particularly obvious in the Algerian high plains. Nevertheless, an accurate analysis of the documentation allows us to discern some indications of inter-provincial contacts via ancient east-west terrestrial routes.

In: Local Economies?

Abstract

This article investigates the history of the agorai and minor plazas, excavated at Sagalassos in SW Turkey, during late antiquity (A.D. 283 to ca. 650). It presents new field observations made by the author, based on a survey of stone surface markings, epigraphic context, and spoliation history, and offers an interpretive study of these spaces in terms of their function during the 4th–7th centuries A.D. An assessment of the significance of these observations for the nature of urban government in this period is also offered.

In: Field Methods and Post-Excavation Techniques in Late Antique Archaeology

Abstract

This paper surveys reused and recycled material culture from the Roman period, particularly that found in late antique contexts. While there is a focus on Late/Post Roman material from Britain, examples from wider Late Antiquity are also included. Reuse and recycling is clearly part of normal Roman practice, however particular instances must be evaluated within their specific contexts and the varied motives that exist for reuse behaviour need to be considered. Reuse seems to increase significantly in the late 4th c. onwards in Britain, and this well-documented evidence can most readily be explained firstly in relation to the wider problems with production and distribution systems that led to a collapse in the availability of new durable material culture at the end of the 4th c. and secondly with regard to wider cultural change.

In: Field Methods and Post-Excavation Techniques in Late Antique Archaeology