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In ‘He is a Glutton and a Drunkard’: Deviant Consumption in the Hebrew Bible Rebekah Welton uses interdisciplinary approaches to explore the social and ritual roles of food and alcohol in Late Bronze Age to Persian-period Syro-Palestine (1550 BCE–400 BCE). This contextual backdrop throws into relief episodes of consumption deemed to be excessive or deviant by biblical writers. Welton emphasises the social networks of the household in which food was entangled, arguing that household animals and ritual foodstuffs were social agents, challenging traditional understandings of sacrifice. For the first time, the accusation of being a ‘glutton and a drunkard’ (Deut 21:18-21) is convincingly re-interpreted in its alimentary and socio-ritual contexts.
In: ‘He is a Glutton and a Drunkard’. Deviant Consumption in the Hebrew Bible
In: ‘He is a Glutton and a Drunkard’. Deviant Consumption in the Hebrew Bible
In: ‘He is a Glutton and a Drunkard’. Deviant Consumption in the Hebrew Bible
In: ‘He is a Glutton and a Drunkard’. Deviant Consumption in the Hebrew Bible
In: ‘He is a Glutton and a Drunkard’. Deviant Consumption in the Hebrew Bible
Listening To and Learning From Children in the Biblical World
In Children and Methods: Listening To and Learning From Children in the Biblical World, Kristine Henriksen Garroway and John W. Martens bring together an interdisciplinary collection of essays addressing children in the Hebrew Bible, New Testament, and broader ancient world. While the study of children has been on the rise in a number of fields, the methodologies by which we listen to and learn from children in ancient Judaism and Christianity have not been critically examined.

This collection of essays proposes that while the various lenses of established methods of higher criticism offer insight into the lives of children, by filtering these methods through the new field of Childist Criticism, children can be heard and seen in a new light.
In: Children and Methods