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Author: Jane Tappuni

This article assesses the opportunities for the publishing industry to utilize blockchain technologies to improve current processes in the book and journal publishing communities. It explains blockchain as a concept and then outlines scenarios and examples where blockchain could be used or is already being used in publishing. The article outlines opportunities that blockchain presents for new business models and the areas of revenue distribution, contract, rights, and royalties, and potential improvements it could bring to the supply chain of content via better workflow, sales, production, and collaboration processes.

In: Logos
In: Logos
In: Logos
Author: Hans M. Zell

This is the second instalment of a two-part article. Part 1 of this article appeared in Logos, 30 (3). Part 2 sets out a number of suggestions to strengthen the book industries in Africa, and the way forward, especially on capacity- and skills-building; training for book industry personnel; strengthening book professional associations, South–South linkages, and knowledge-sharing; encouraging international collaboration; the need for ongoing research and documentation; African books in the global marketplace; and the important but still neglected area of publishing in African indigenous languages. An Appendix provides a summary of the International Publishers Association (IPA) and Association for the Development of Education in Africa (ADEA) meetings on the African book industry, held in Nairobi in June 2019, together with links to a number of articles, reports, and press statements about the meetings.

In: Logos

The aim of this paper is to analyse and compare the graphic elements present on book covers published in Croatia from 2012 to 2018, and compare the data with the graphic elements on book covers from five other European book markets. Hofstede’s model of cultural dimensions was used in the research to examine the ways in which the design of book covers is influenced by culture. The graphic elements on book covers from Croatia and a sample of five European countries were compared using the visual content analysis method. Element frequency scores were correlated with indexes from Hofstede’s model of national culture and interpreted on the basis of the existing literature using the chi-squared test. Both the quantitative and qualitative analyses were carried out on the sample of 633 book covers (using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences [SPSS] and a custom-made web application, respectively).

In: Logos
In: Logos

This article discusses changes in the materiality of textbooks by examining several examples of primarily Slovene textbooks from various periods. By focusing on their spread design rather than technical aspects (e.g., length, weight, and format), one may infer that their materiality changed with the development of printing technologies and publishing skills. Based on the assumption that textbook visuality is a field of meaning that requires different bodily movements, postures, and engagement with the physical environment to produce cognitive processing, this article sheds light on how the body adapts to the changed materiality of digital textbooks. Numerous micro-movements in a long string of procedures are required in a digital textbook ecosystem. All the participants should be aware of the different demands and properties of the digital textbook ecosystem. Therefore, further empirical research is needed.

In: Logos
Author: Zoë Chatfield

Originally, literary prizes were restricted to the world of academia, but since the 19th century they have grown to become commercial events in the publishing calendar. This article looks at the role of the literary prize as an agent of change by focusing on two prominent prizes in the United Kingdom: the Booker and the Women’s Prize for Fiction. By analysing data from archive material held at Oxford Brookes University, this article argues that the founding of the Women’s Prize highlighted an issue with the Booker and promoted discussion around that issue, and that the Booker reacted positively in the years after the introduction of a competing literary prize.

In: Logos

In this paper, I review the Thanks for Typing conference held at Oxford University in March 2019, which explored the experiences of women who worked as literary helpmeets for famous men. I also give some details from the papers presented there. In my paper ‘“Jumped-up Typists”: Two secretaries who became guardians of the flame’, I discussed how two literary wives, Sophia Mumford (1899–1997), wife of the American historian and philosopher Lewis Mumford, and Valerie Eliot (1926–2012), second wife of T. S. Eliot, found their identities in supporting, and later defending, their husbands’ work. I also looked at the consequences of their devotion as they grew older. It was clear from the papers presented at Thanks for Typing that the contributions of the women who surround powerful or influential men—not only as typists but as assistants, muses, and even managers of their husbands’ affairs—are often hidden and suppressed. The full acknowledgment of those who contribute to creative and intellectual work is a subject that needs further attention from both men and women.

In: Logos

To explore the reason why some biographies by or about politicians are more successful than others, and to help publishers consider the range of factors that may impact on their commissioning decisions, we sought to establish a range of likely influencing factors and to combine them in a formula. This is not a magic prediction tool, but rather a range of considerations that need to be worked through for various publishing propositions before decisions are made. As an exercise, and a starting point for wider discussions, it may benefit a group of individuals preparing for an editorial meeting at which commissioning is to be considered.

In: Logos