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This is a collection of international law materials relating to the Philippines: excerpts of treaties and declarations; international judicial and arbitral decisions; and Philippine constitutional clauses, statutes and Supreme Court decisions.

Today new theories abound, calling for comparative perspectives that look at International Law through the lens of national and regional practice. This book engages that challenge at a concrete level, e.g., how the Marcos human rights abuses were litigated abroad but never in Philippine courts, and how victim claims for reparations are, ironically, blocked by the Philippine Government citing the Filipino people’s competing claims over Marcoses' ill-gotten wealth. It retells Philippine history using international law, and re-examines international law using the Philippine experience.
This volume offers original research on religious freedom from around the globe. Individual chapters address the issues related to defining and understanding the concept of religious freedom and incorporate sociological thinking into interdisciplinary analysis of this topic. By interpreting legal cases, analyzing cross-national data, interviewing policy-makers, and reviewing policy-papers concerning religious freedom, the authors highlight the necessity of sociology engaging with other disciples in this type of research. By applying theories of religious pluralism, secularity, secularization, judicialization of religion, “lived religion”, total institutions, and others, this volume contributes theoretical perspectives, sociological concepts and empirical analyses that highlight the development of religious freedom as an area of study in the social sciences.
The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law aims to publish peer-reviewed scholarly articles and reviews as well as significant developments in human rights and humanitarian law. It examines international human rights and humanitarian law with a global reach, though its particular focus is on the Asian region.

The focused theme of Volume 5 is Law, Culture and Human Rights in Asia and the Middle East.
This book focuses on trend-setting judgements in different parts of the world that impacted on the rights of individuals belonging to minorities and indigenous people. The cases illustrate how the judiciary has been called upon to fill out the detail of minority protection arrangements and how, in doing so, in many instances the judiciary has taken the respective countries on a course that parliament may not have been able to navigate. In this book authors from various nationalities and backgrounds in the practical application of minority protection arrangements investigate the role of the judiciary in constitutional arrangements aimed at the protection of the rights of minorities and indigenous peoples.
Why do churches assist people without authorized residence even when the state prohibits and punishes such conduct? What does it mean for church-state relations when the church steps into the shoes (or perhaps on the feet) of the government? And are all levels of government on the same page when it comes to migration? These are just some of the questions that this book addresses.
In a world in which migration is an omnipresent reality, these issues pervade national borders, ethnic divides, and physical barriers. These issues are shared among all nations and peoples of this world, and deserve utmost attention as geopolitical contours continue to evolve.
Author: Yudan Tan
In The Rome Statute as Evidence of Customary International Law, Yudan Tan offers a detailed analysis of topical issues concerning the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court as evidence of customary international law. The 1998 Rome Statute has generated a great deal of scholarly interest. Providing a novel way of analysing the treaty-custom interactions, Yudan Tan examines the customary status of essential parts of the Rome Statute. Based on a flexible two-element identification approach, focusing more on opinio juris, Yudan Tan convincingly argues that provisions of the Rome Statute were partly declaratory of custom when adopted in 1998, and that they are also partly declaratory of custom at the present time.
Editors: Chong ZHANG and Ruoyu LI
This volume contains a selection of the edited and in some cases translated papers presented at the first South-South Human Rights Forum held in Beijing. The conference was jointly sponsored by the State Council Information Office and the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The event drew hundreds of participants, mainly scholars and government officials from developing countries and international organizations. Its main theme was “Building a Human Community with a Shared Future”, which built on a proposal launched by President Xi Jinping. The papers are mostly short and often policy-oriented, offering a unique insight into the thinking and planning associated with this South-South exchange and thus a wealth of information of interest to scholars. The topics covered emerge primarily from development-related issues, such as the rights to food, education, health and poverty reduction. Though much of the volume thus focuses on economic and social rights and the right to development, civil and political rights are also discussed in the context of the need for legal guarantees for the exercise of human rights and judicial protection of rights.
This volume conducts an in-depth analysis of the ECtHR’s case law in the area of migration and asylum as regards the most relevant rights of the ECHR, exploring the role of this court in this area of law. Each chapter deals with the case law on one specific ECHR article. In addition, the volume is enriched by two additional studies which deal with issues that are treated in a transversal manner, namely vulnerability and the margin of appreciation. The volume systematises the case law on aliens’ rights under the ECHR, offering readers the chance to familiarise themselves with or gain deeper insight into the main principles the Strasbourg court applies in its case law regarding aliens.