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Ebenezer Durojaye and Mariam Wallet Med Aboubakrine

This article examines non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as a challenge among indigenous population in Africa. From a rights-based perspective, the article considers some of the social determinants of health and other challenges that can aggravate NCDs among indigenous groups in Africa. It further examines the recognition of the right to health of indigenous populations under international law. This is followed by a discussion on some of the barriers to addressing NCDs among indigenous peoples in the region. It concludes by urging African governments to be more proactive in adopting measures grounded in human rights standards to address the rising incidence of NCDs among indigenous peoples in the region.

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Francisco Pascual-Vives

In Consensus-Based Interpretation of Regional Human Rights Treaties Francisco Pascual-Vives examines the central role played by the notion of consensus in the case law of the European and Inter-American Courts of Human Rights. As many other international courts and tribunals do, both regional human rights courts resort to this concept while undertaking an evolutive interpretation of the Rome Convention and the Pact of San José, respectively. The role exerted by the notion of consensus in this framework can be used not only to understand the evolving character of the rights and freedoms recognized by these international treaties, but also to reaffirm the international nature of these regional human rights courts.
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Erotic Subjects and Outlaws

Sketching the Borders of Sexual Citizenship

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Edited by Serena Petrella

This book examines the intricacies of emergent sexual citizenship. Designed for academics and broader audiences alike, the collection covers the theorization of sexual citizenship, the exploration of case studies in law, the relationship between sexual citizenship and bio-politics, and finally the erotic dissidence of sexual outlaws. The borders of sexual citizenship are traced, as authors investigate what it means to be ‘inside,’ as erotic subjects, or outside, as ‘sexual outlaws.’ The issues of inclusion and exclusion are approached through diverse methodological and analytical lenses: some articles are theoretical and philosophical, others are empirically based, presenting the findings of sociological and ethnographic research projects; some are textual analyses, of religious texts, film texts, and of legal discourse. Contributors are Abidemi Fasanmi, René Hirsch, Elene Lam, Jaclyn Lanthier, Todd G. Morrison, Nick J. Mulé, Elly-Jean Nielsen, Serena Petrella, Olivia Schuman and Deww Zhang.
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Corruption and Targeted Sanctions

Law and Policy of Anti-Corruption Entry Bans

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Anton Moiseienko

In Corruption and Targeted Sanctions, Anton Moiseienko analyses the blacklisting foreigners suspected of corruption and the prohibition of their entry into the sanctioning state from an international law perspective. The implications of such actions have been on the international agenda for years and have gained particular prominence with the adoption by the US and Canada of the so-called Magnitsky legislation in 2016. Across the Atlantic, several European states followed suit.

The proliferation of anti-corruption entry sanctions has prompted a reappraisal of applicable human rights safeguards, along with issues of respect for official immunities and state sovereignty. On the basis of a comprehesive review of relevant law and policy, Anton Moiseienko identifies how targeted sanctions can ensure accountability for corruption while respecting international law.
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Social Rights of Children in Europe

A Case Law Study on Selected Rights

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Katharina Häusler

The Convention on the Rights of the Child has changed the paradigm of how (human rights) law looks at children: from “objects” of protection to full rights-holders of all human rights. Consequently, social rights are not voluntary welfare services but an expression of the dignity and rights of the child. In Social Rights of Children in Europe Katharina Häusler provides a thorough analysis of how these basic social rights are interpreted by the three major human rights bodies on the level of the Council of Europe and the European Union. It thus offers not only an excellent picture of the main lines of interpretation but also of the major gaps and challenges for the realisation of children’s social rights in Europe.
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Mark Chadwick

In Piracy and the Origins of Universal Jurisdiction, Mark Chadwick relates a colourful account of how and why piracy on the high seas came to be considered an international crime subject to the principle of universal jurisdiction, prosecutable by any State in any circumstances.

Merging domestic and international law international and domestic, history, literature and sociology, the author weaves an intricate tale that reveals the pirate to be the original “enemy of mankind” and forerunner of today’s international criminals: those who commit genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. In so doing, Mark Chadwick proposes a convincing reappraisal of the pirate’s role in the crystallisation of international criminal law, bringing much-needed clarity to a disputed area of international legal history.
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Exile within Borders

A Global Look at Commitment to the International Regime to Protect Internally Displaced Persons

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Gabriel Cardona-Fox

Twenty years after the introduction of the UN Guiding Principles for the Protection of Internally Displaced Persons, very little is known about their effectiveness in altering state behavior towards their displaced populations.
In this book Gabriel Cardona-Fox takes a systematic and global first look at patterns of commitment and compliance with the IDP regime. Through the innovative use of statistical analysis on all documented cases of displacement and an in-depth case study of Colombia’s evolving response towards internal displacement, this book identifies the domestic and international forces that drive some states to institute and comply with these guidelines.
Exile Within Borders fills an important gap in the literature and moves the debate over the regime’s effectiveness beyond anecdotal evidence.
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Edited by Martin Lau

The Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law (YIMEL) is the leading English language journal covering contemporary Islamic laws and laws of the Middle East. Practitioners and academics dealing with the Middle East can turn to YIMEL for an instant source of information on the developments in the Middle East region and wider Muslim world. YIMEL covers Islamic and non-Islamic legal subjects, including the laws themselves, of some twenty Arab and other Islamic countries. Focusing on YIMEL's role in publishing and disseminating ground-breaking and novel research on Islamic law, Volume 19 includes a Special Edition on the theme of Islamic Law and Empire consisting of a dedicated Preface and articles in Part I, as well as other contributions on legal developments in the Middle East and South Asia, important judgements and book reviews, assembled in Part II. The publication's practical features include: - articles on current topics, - the text of a selection of important case judgments, - book reviews.
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Welcoming Ruin

The Civil Rights Act of 1875

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Alan Friedlander and Richard Allan Gerber

The Civil Rights Act of 1875, enacted March 1, 1875, banned racial discrimination in public accommodations – hotels, public conveyances and places of public amusement. In 1883 the U.S. Supreme Court declared the law unconstitutional, ushering in generations of segregation until 1964. This first full-length study of the Act covers the years of debates in Congress and some forty state studies of the midterm elections of 1874 in which many supporting Republicans lost their seats. They returned to pass the Act in the short session of Congress. This book utilizes an army of primary sources from unpublished manuscripts, rare newspaper accounts, memoir materials and official documents to demonstrate that Republicans were motivated primarily by an ideology that civil equality would produce social order in the defeated southern states.