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Edited by Melanie Harris

Ecowomanism emerges from third wave womanist thought that emphasises interdisciplinary, interreligious and intergenerational dialogue as approaches to environmental ethics. Ecowomanism unashamedly validates the importance of the perspectives of women of color, and especially the voices, perspectives and contributions of women of African descent.

Melanie L. Harris

Abstract

This essay provides a definition and theoretical frame for ecowomanism. The approach to environmental justice centers the perspectives of women of African descent and reflects upon these women’s activist methods, religious practices, and theories on how to engage earth justice. As a part of the womanist tradition, methodologically ecowomanism features race, class, gender intersectional analysis to examine environmental injustice around the planet. Thus, it builds upon an environmental justice paradigm that also links social justice to environmental justice. Ecowomanism highlights the necessity for race-class-gender intersectional analysis when examining the logic of domination, and unjust public policies that result in environmental health disparities that historically disadvantage communities of color. As an aspect of third wave womanist religious thought, ecowomanism is also shaped by religious worldviews reflective of African cosmologies and uphold a moral imperative for earth justice. Noting the significance of African and Native American cosmologies that link divine, human and nature realms into an interconnected web of life, ecowomanism takes into account the religious practices and spiritual beliefs that are important tenets and points of inspiration for ecowomanist activism.

Melanie L. Harris

Melanie L. Harris

Rose Mary Amenga-Etego

Abstract

Nankani women are not only thought to believe they are spiritual beings; they are also made to understand that they are structurally interwoven with their ecosystem. From the mythical and proverbial saying, ‘he who wilfully kills a woman has invoked upon himself a curse that he can never fully rectify,’ to the religio-cultural symbolic representations of the woman as a calabash (vegetation) and/or and earthen pot (sand/clay), Nankani women are socialized to accept and recognise their integral place and role in their society’s life and wellbeing. Thus strategically entangled with the family, clan and the community’s beliefs and practices; the women believe they are purposefully situated to play their multi-tasking roles just as a pregnant woman nurtures and sustains the life within her. This paper provides some insights into Nankani women’s spirituality and ecology.

Xiumei Pu

Abstract

This essay explores the synergies between ecowomanism and Bön, a spiritual tradition that is indigenous to Tibet. It develops the concept of “ecospirituality,” a nature-inspired spiritual way of knowing and living, arguing that ecowomanism and Bön gravitate toward each other for their shared ecospiritual sensibility. This sensibility has the potential to generate and sustain possibilities for social and environment wellbeing. An examination of the ecospiritual synergies between ecowomanism and Bön can inspire new ways of knowing and help create constructive methods of making positive changes at individual, social, and environmental levels.

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Edited by Karl A. E.. Enenkel and Paul J. Smith

This volume tries to map out the intriguing amalgam of the different, partly conflicting approaches that shaped early modern zoology. Early modern reading of the “Book of Nature” comprised, among others, the description of species in the literary tradition of antiquity, as well as empirical observations, vivisection, and modern eyewitness accounts; the “translation” of zoological species into visual art for devotion, prayer, and religious education, but also scientific and scholarly curiosity; theoretical, philosophical, and theological thinking regarding God’s creation, the Flood, and the generation of animals; new attempts with respect to nomenclature and taxonomy; the discovery of unknown species in the New World; impressive Wunderkammer collections, and the keeping of exotic animals in princely menageries. The volume demonstrates that theology and philology played a pivotal role in the complex formation of this new science.

Contributors include: Brian Ogilvie, Bernd Roling, Erik Jorink, Paul Smith, Sabine Kalff, Tamás Demeter, Amanda Herrin, Marrigje Rikken, Alexander Loose, Sophia Hendrikx, and Karl Enenkel.

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Stephen W. Krauss and Ralph W. Hood

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Stephen W. Krauss and Ralph W. Hood

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Stephen W. Krauss and Ralph W. Hood