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Beyond Marx and Other Entries is a truly original book by David Gleicher, author of The Rescue of the Third Class on the Titanic: A Revisionist History (Liverpool University Press, 2006). It explores deep areas of semiotics, joined with economics, anthropology, sociology, history and philosophy and political science, even Franz Kafka's literary works. These are communicated by entries, based primarily on Gleicher’s actual blog Looking through the crack from 2013 to 2017. No other book quite compares to it, but one might equate it to impressionist art, or the 'the one and the many'. Each entry is independent; nothing in one makes even an allusion to another. Readers, however, cannot help but to make connections themselves and develop their own understandings of dystopian possibilities.
Editor: Kuisma Korhonen
In the last decades, there has been an intense debate on the relationship between literature and historiography, often linked to the debate between “empiricists” and “postmodernists”. The aim of this collective work is to address this debate, and to search for new ways of thinking and encountering the past.
The key note for the book comes from Hayden White, one of the leading academic figures, whose role in launching the contemporary history/literature debate has been crucial. It is followed by three critical readings of his work, all suggesting new ways to apply or challenge his views. In other chapters of the book, history / literature question is then addressed from three points of view: narrativity, history as literature, and literature as history.
Tropes for the Past is an ideal introduction to the literature/historiography debate and Hayden White’s role in it. It will be of use for all students and scholars in the philosophy of history and in historically oriented literary, cultural, and social studies.
Transcultural Traffic and the U.S. National Imaginary
A welcome addition to the fields of Latino and (trans-)American cultural and literary studies, Latino Dreams focuses on a selection of Latino narratives, published between the mid-1980s and the mid-1990s, that may be said to traffic in the U.S.A.’s attendant myths and governing cultural logics. The selection includes novels by authors who have received little academic attention—Abraham Rodriguez, Achy Obejas, and Benjamin Alire Sáenz—along with underattended texts from more renowned writers—Rosario Ferré, Coco Fusco, and Guillermo Gómez-Peña. Latino Dreams takes a transcultural approach in order to raise questions of subaltern subordination and domination, and the resistant capacities of cultural production. The analysis explores how the selected narratives deploy specific narrative tactics, and a range of literary and other cultural capital, in order to question and reform the U.S.A.’s imaginary coordinates. In these texts, moreover, national imperatives are complicated by recourse to feminist, queer, panethnic, postcolonial, or transnational agendas. Yet the analysis also recognizes instances in which the counter-narrative will is frustrated: the narratives may provide signs of the U.S.A.’s hegemonic resilience in the face of imaginary disavowal.