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Series:

Nada Saab and Robert Myers

In Modern and Contemporary Political Theater from the Levant, A Critical Anthology, Robert Myers and Nada Saab provide a sense of the variety and complexity of political theater produced in and around the Levant from the 1960s to the present within a context of wider discussions about political theater and the histories and forms of performance from the Islamic and Arab worlds. Five major playwrights are studied, ʿIsam Mahfuz, from Lebanon; Muhammad al-Maghut and Saʿd Allah Wannus, from Syria; Jawad al-Asadi, from Iraq, Syria and Lebanon; and Raʾida Taha, from Palestine. The volume includes translations of their plays The Dictator, The Jester, The Rape, Baghdadi Bath and Where Would I Find Someone Like You, ʿAli?, respectively.

1 ʿIsam Mahfuz 28

The Dictator

Series:

Robert Myers and Nada Saab

Translator Robert Myers and Nada Saab

Series:

Robert Myers and Nada Saab

Translator Gordon Witty

Series:

Robert Myers and Nada Saab

Translator Robert Myers and Nada Saab

4 Jawad al-Asadi 298

Baghdadi Bath

Series:

Robert Myers and Nada Saab

Translator Robert Myers and Nada Saab

5 Ra⁠ʾida Taha 331

Where Would I Find Someone Like You, ʿAli?

Series:

Robert Myers and Nada Saab

Translator Ismail Khalidi

The Encoded Cirebon Mask

Materiality, Flow, and Meaning along Java's Islamic Northwest Coast

Series:

Laurie Margot Ross

In The Encoded Cirebon Mask: Materiality, Flow, and Meaning along Java’s Islamic
Northwest Coast
, Laurie Margot Ross situates masks and masked dancing in the Cirebon region of Java (Indonesia) as an original expression of Islam. This is a different view from that of many scholars, who argue that canonical prohibitions on fashioning idols and imagery prove that masks are mere relics of indigenous beliefs that Muslim travelers could not eradicate. Making use of archives, oral histories, and the performing objects themselves, Ross traces the mask’s trajectory from a popular entertainment in Cirebon—once a portal of global exchange—to a stimulus for establishing a deeper connection to God in late colonial Java, and eventual links to nationalism in post-independence Indonesia.