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Kimerer L. LaMothe

The relationship between religion and dance is as old as humankind. Contemporary methods for studying this relationship date back a century. The difference between these two time frames is significant: scholars are still developing theories and methods capable of illuminating this vast history that take account of their limited place within it. A History of Theory and Method in the Study of Religion and Dance takes on a primary challenge of doing so: overcoming a conceptual dichotomy between “religion” and “dance” forged in the colonial era that justified western Christian hostility towards dance traditions across six continents over six centuries. Beginning with its enlightenment roots, LaMothe narrates a selective history of this dichotomy, revealing its ongoing work in separating dance studies from religious studies. Turning to the Bushmen of the African Kalahari, LaMothe introduces an ecokinetic approach that provides scholars with conceptual resources for mapping the generative interdependence of phenomena that appear as “dance” and/or “religion.”

Series:

Kimerer L. LaMothe

Abstract

The relationship between religion and dance is as old as humankind. Contemporary methods for studying this relationship date back a century. The difference between these two time frames is significant: scholars are still developing theories and methods capable of illuminating this vast history that take account of their limited place within it. A History of Theory and Method in the Study of Religion and Dance takes on a primary challenge of doing so: overcoming a conceptual dichotomy between “religion” and “dance” forged in the colonial era that justified western Christian hostility towards dance traditions across six continents over six centuries. Beginning with its enlightenment roots, LaMothe narrates a selective history of this dichotomy, revealing its ongoing work in separating dance studies from religious studies. Turning to the Bushmen of the African Kalahari, LaMothe introduces an ecokinetic approach that provides scholars with conceptual resources for mapping the generative interdependence of phenomena that appear as “dance” and/or “religion.”

Andreas Friz’s Letter on Tragedies (ca. 1741-1744)

An Eighteenth-Century Jesuit contribution to theatre poetics

Series:

Nienke Tjoelker

In Andreas Friz’s Letter on tragedies (ca. 1741-1744) Nienke Tjoelker offers insight into the Jesuit school theatre of the eighteenth century. Commonly ignored by scholars, who assume that by then Jesuit theatre was disappearing and of poor quality, it appears to be very much alive and interacting with contemporary vernacular theatre.
Tjoelker places Friz's poetics in its historical and literary context in an extensive introduction and presents an edition with translation. She investigates Friz's focus on the imitation of French classical writers, such as Jean Racine (1639-1699) and Pierre Corneille (1606-1684). Friz criticised his colleagues for their excessive use of multimedia ornaments, which hindered the correct application of the three classical unities and verisimilitude.