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From Missionary to Indigenous Church
Among the assumptions interrogated in this volume, edited by Anthony E. Clark, is if Christianity should most accurately be identified as “Chinese” when it displays vestiges of Chinese cultural aesthetics, or whether Chinese Christianity is more indigenous when it is allowed to form its own theological framework. In other words, can theological uniqueness also function as a legitimate Chinese Christian cultural expression in the formation of its own ecclesial identity? Also central to what is explored in this book is how missionary influences, consciously or unconsciously, introduced seeds of independence into the cultural ethos of China’s Christian community. Chinese girls who pushed “the limits of proper behaviour,” for example, added to the larger sense of confidence as China’s Christians began to resist the model of Christianity they had inherited from foreign missionaries.

Contributors are: Robert E. Carbonneau, CP, Christie Chui-Shan Chow, Amanda C. R. Clark, Lydia Gerber, Joseph W. Ho, Joseph Tse-hei Lee, Audrey Seah, Jean-Paul Wiest, and Xiaoxin Wu.
Zur Hermeneutik der chinesisch-christlichen Begegnung nach Wu Leichuan (1869-1944)
This work explores the Christian-Chinese encounter from a non-Confucian perspective, exemplified by the comparison between Jesus and the philosopher Mozi (5th c. B.C.). The investigation is based on the work Mozi yu Yesu of the Hanlin scholar and convert Wu Leichuan (1869–1944). The first part gives a biographical sketch and discusses the writings and prolegomena of the Sino-Christian hermeneutics of Wu. Part two describes the social reformer Mozi and his teachings that are interpreted by Wu in a Christian way. Part three presents the life and teachings of Jesus according to Wu as well as his attempts to establish a “Ruist” view of the Christian tradition. Part four is dedicated to the comparison between Mozi and Jesus, with special emphasis on Wu’s understanding of religion. The fifth part refers to the defectiveness of the Chinese and Christian traditions and to the necessity of a return to the “true and original Dao.”
In: Christianity in Modern China
In: Christianity in Modern China
In: Christianity in Modern China
In: Christianity in Modern China
In: Christianity in Modern China
In: Christianity in Modern China
In: Christianity in Modern China
In: Christianity in Modern China