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Volume 5 (2020), Published under the auspices of Queen Mary University of London and EFILA
With the entrance of the European Union into the field of International Investment Law and Arbitration, a new specialist field of law, namely ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’ is in the making. This new field of law draws on EU Law, Public International Law, International Investment Law, International Arbitration Law and Practice and International Economic Law, while other fields of law such as Energy Law are also relevant.
This Review is the first law yearbook that is specifically dedicated to the field of ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’.

Published under the auspices of Queen Mary University of London and EFILA.

The European Investment Law and Arbitration Review is also available online.
Volume Editors: Michael Hahn and Guillaume Van der Loo
Law and Practice of the Common Commercial Policy provides a critical analysis of the European Union (EU)’s trade law and policy since the Treaty of Lisbon. In particular, it analyses the salient changes brought by the Treaty of Lisbon to the Common Commercial Policy (CCP), focussing on the relevant case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ), EU free trade agreements, investment protection, trade defence, institutional developments and the nexus between the CCP and other EU policies.

The volume brings together a group of distinguished authors, including former and current members of the ECJ, practitioners, officials from EU institutions and Member States and leading scholars in the area of EU trade and external relations law.
The Law and Practice of Facultative Mixity
Volume Editors: Merijn Chamon and Inge Govaere
Despite the Lisbon Treaty reforming the EU Treaty provisions on external relations, it was argued at the time of the Treaty’s entry into force that ‘mixity was here to stay’. While this has indeed proven to be the case, the Court of Justice’s jurisprudence has nonetheless redrawn the contours within which mixity can thrive and for the first time has confirmed the existence of ‘facultative mixity’. In light of these significant post-Lisbon developments the volume aims to clarify the law and policy of facultative mixed agreements in the EU’s treaty practice and this not only from the perspective of EU (constitutional) law itself but also from the perspective of the EU Member States’ legal systems, that of the EU’s third country treaty partners and that of public international law itself.
In: EU External Relations Post-Lisbon
In: EU External Relations Post-Lisbon
In: EU External Relations Post-Lisbon
In: EU External Relations Post-Lisbon