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Chinese Visions of Progress, 1895 to 1949 offers a panoramic view of reflections on progress in modern China. Since the turn of the twentieth century, the discourses on progress shape Chinese understandings of modernity and its pitfalls. As this in-depth study shows, these discourses play a pivotal role in the fields of politics, society, culture, as well as philosophy, history, and literature. It is therefore no exaggeration to say that the Chinese ideas of progress, their often highly optimistic implications, but also the criticism of modernity they offered, opened the gateway for reflections on China’s past, its position in the present world, and its future course.
Essays on History and Theories of History, Politics and Historiography
Editor: Davide Cadeddu
In A Companion to Antonio Gramsci some of the most important Italian scholars of Gramsci's thought realize an intellectual account of the Gramscian historiography. The volume is organized into five parts. In the first, an updated reconstruction of his biographical events is offered. The second part provides three different perspectives permitting an analysis of the ideas and theories of history which emerge from Gramsci’s writings. In the third section as well as the fourth section, the most explicitly political themes are considered. Finally, in the last part the timelines of twentieth century historiography in Italy are traced and a picture is painted of the reasons for the development of the principal problems surrounding the international literary output on Gramsci.

Contributors include: Alberto Burgio, Davide Cadeddu, Giuseppe Cospito, Angelo d’Orsi, Michele Filippini, Guido Liguori, Marcello Montanari, Vittorio Morfino, Stefano Petrucciani, Michele Prospero, Leonardo Rapone, Giuseppe Vacca, and Marzio Zanantoni.
Radical Arts and Politics in Perspective
Editor: Carolin Kosuch
Anarchism and the Avant-Garde: Radical Arts and Politics in Perspective contributes to the continuing debate on the encounter of the classical anarchisms (1860s−1940s) and the artistic and literary avant-gardes of the same period, probing its dimensions and limits. Case studies on Dadaism, decadence, fauvism, neo-impressionism, symbolism, and various anarchisms explore the influence anarchism had on the avant-gardes and reflect on avant-garde tendencies within anarchism. This volume also explores the divergence of anarchism and the avant-gardes. It offers a rich examination of politics and arts, and it complements an ongoing discourse with theoretical tools to better assess the aesthetic, social, and political cross-pollination that took place between the avant-gardes and the anarchists in Europe.
Self-reflection is fundamental for human thinking on many levels. Philosophy has described the mind's capacity to observe itself as a core element of human existence. Political and social sciences have shown how modern democracies depend on society's ability to critically reflect on their own values and practices. And literature of all ages has proven self-reflexivity to be a crucial trait of cultural production.

This volume provides the first diachronic panorama of genres, forms, and functions of literary self-reflection and their connections with social, political and philosophical discourses from the 17th century to the present. Far beyond the usual focus on postmodernist opacity, these contributions present a rich tradition of critical transparency: Literary texts that show us what is behind and beyond them.
In: Self-reflection in Literature
In: Self-reflection in Literature
In: Self-reflection in Literature
In: Self-reflection in Literature
In: Self-reflection in Literature

Abstract

A remarkable number of contemporary autobiographies are characterized by an intense self-awareness regarding the process of their own artistic production. They foreground processes of selection and narrativization and highlight the cultural patterns and ideologies that shape the discourses of life writing. Self-reflexivity in autobiography is not a new phenomenon, but goes back to well-known examples like Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy (1759–1767) and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s Dichtung und Wahrheit (1811). However, as this chapter shows, the self-reflexive and critical analysis of autobiography’s generic conventions has advanced as a central topic in quite a large amount of recently published life narratives. Memoirs and autobiographies that include a commentary on their own narrative procedures and interpretive acts force the reader to realize that all narrative (including the supposedly referential or historical genres) is a construct. Life narratives that re-negotiate and scrutinize the usually tacit but extremely influential generic conventions of the supposedly factual genre of autobiography become a means to illuminate the epistemological, the mnemonic, and the ethical issues at stake in the act of writing a life.

In: Self-reflection in Literature