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  • Brill | Rodopi x
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Series:

Anna Branach-Kallas and Piotr Sadkowski

Comparing Grief in French, British and Canadian Great War Fiction (1977-2014) offers a comparative analysis of twenty-three First World War novels. Engaging with such themes as war trauma, facial disfigurement, women’s war identities, communal bonds, as well as the concepts of mourning and post-memory, Anna Branach-Kallas and Piotr Sadkowski identify the dominant trends in recent French, British and Canadian fiction about the Great War. Referring to historical, sociological, philosophical and literary sources, they show how, by both consolidating and contesting national myths, fiction continues to construct the 1914-1918 conflict as a cultural trauma, illuminating at the same time some of our most recent ethical concerns.

Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present

Fields of Action, Fields of Vision

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Edited by Claire Bowen and Catherine Hoffmann

Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present examines representations of war in literature, film, photography, memorials, and the popular press. The volume breaks new ground in cutting across disciplinary boundaries and offering case studies on a wide variety of fields of vision and action, and types of conflict: from civil wars in the USA, Spain, Russia and the Congo to recent western interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq. In the case of World War Two, Representing Wars emphasises idiosyncratic and non-western perspectives – specifically those of Japanese writers Hayashi and Ooka.
A central concern of the thirteen contributors has been to investigate the ethical and ideological implications of specific representational choices.

Contributors are: Claire Bowen, Catherine Ann Collins, Marie-France Courriol, Éliane Elmaleh, Teresa Gibert, William Gleeson, Catherine Hoffmann, Sandrine Lascaux, Christopher Lloyd, Monica Michlin, Guillaume Muller, Misako Nemoto, Clément Sigalas.

Publishing in Joyce's Ulysses

Newspapers, Advertising and Printing

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Edited by William Brockman, Tekla Mecsnóber and Sabrina Alonso

Appearing in an era of rapid change in the printing and publishing industries, James Joyce’s Ulysses exploited and exemplified those industries to the degree that the book can be seen as a virtual museum of 1904 media. Publishing in Joyce's “Ulysses”: Newspapers, Advertising and Printing, edited by William S. Brockman, Tekla Mecsnóber and Sabrina Alonso, gathers twelve essays by Joyce scholars exploring facets of those trades that pervade the substance of the book. Essays explore the book’s incorporation of mass-market weekly magazines, contemporary advertising slogans, newspaper clippings, the “Aeolus” episode’s printing office and the varied typographic styles of successive editions of Ulysses. Placing Joyce’s work in its historical milieu, the collection offers a fresh perspective on modern print culture.

Contributors are: Sabrina Alonso, Harald Beck, William S. Brockman, Elisabetta d'Erme, Judith Harrington, Matthew Hayward, Sangam MacDuff, Tekla Mecsnóber, Tamara Radak, Fritz Senn, David Spurr, Jolanta Wawrzycka.

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Jopi Nyman

Displacement, Memory, and Travel in Contemporary Migrant Writing examines contemporary cultural representations of transforming identities in the era of increasing global mobility. It pays particular attention to the ways in which cultural encounters are experienced affectively and discursively in migrant literature. Divided into three parts that deal with refugee writing and displacement, migration and memory, and new European identities, the volume develops current methodologies and shows how postcolonial studies can be applied to the study of cultural encounters. Writers studied include Simão Kikamba, Ishmael Beah, Madhur Jaffrey, Diana Abu-Jaber, Abdulrazak Gurnah, Caryl Phillips, Jamal Mahjoub, and Monica Ali, and several refugee writers.

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Edited by Mihaela Irimia, Andreea Paris and Dragoş Manea

Cultural Memory, a subtle and comprehensive process of identity formation, promotion and transmission, is considered as a set of symbolic practices and protocols, with particular emphasis on repositories of memory and the institutionalized forms in which they are embodied. High and low culture as texts embedded in the texture of memory, as well as material culture as a communal receptacle and reservoir of memory are analysed in their historical contingency. Symbolic representations of accepted and counter history/ies, and the cultural nodes and mechanisms of the cultural imaginary are also issues of central interest. Twenty-six contributions tackle these topics from a theoretical and historical perspective and bring to the fore case studies illustrating the interdisciplinary agenda that underlies the volume.

Contributors: Luis Manuel A.V. Bernardo, Lina Bolzoni, Peter Burke, Pia Brinzeu, Adina Ciugureanu, Thomas Docherty, Christoph Ehland, Herbert Grabes, László Gyapay, Donna Landry, Christoph Lehner, Gerald MacLean, Dragoş Manea, Daniel Melo, Mirosława Modrzewska, Rareş Moldovan, C.W.R.D. Mosely, Petruţa Năiduţ, Francesca Orestano, Maria Lúcia G. Pallares-Burke, Andreea Paris, Leonor Santa Bárbara, Hans-Peter Söder, Jukka Tiusanen, Ludmila Volná, Ioana Zirra.

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Edited by Dunja M. Mohr and Birgit Däwes

Radical Planes? 9/11 and Patterns of Continuity, edited by Dunja M. Mohr and Birgit Däwes, explores the intersections between narrative disruption and continuity in post-9/11 narratives from an interdisciplinary transnational perspective, foregrounding the transatlantic cultural memory of 9/11. Contesting the earlier notion of a cataclysm that has changed ‘everything,’ and critically reflecting on American exceptionalism, the collection offers an inquiry into what has gone unchanged in terms of pre-9/11, post-9/11, and post-post-9/11 issues and what silences persist. How do literature and performative and visual arts negotiate this precarious balance of a pervasive discourse of change and emerging patterns of political, ideological, and cultural continuity?

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Tina Marie Boyer

In The Giant Hero in Medieval Literature Tina Boyer counters the monstrous status of giants by arguing that they are more broadly legible than traditionally believed. Building on an initial analysis of St. Augustine’s City of God, Bernard of Clairvaux’s deliberations on monsters and marvels, and readings in Tomasin von Zerclaere’s Welsche Gast provide insights into the spectrum of antagonistic and heroic roles that giants play in the courtly realm. This approach places the figure of the giant within the cultural and religious confines of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries and allows an in-depth analysis of epics and romances through political, social, religious, and gender identities tied to the figure of the giant. Sources range from German to French, English, and Iberian works.

Writings of Persuasion and Dissonance in the Great War

That Better Whiles May Follow Worse

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Edited by David Owen and Maria Cristina Pividori

Through chapters dedicated to specific writers and texts, Writings of Persuasion and Dissonance in the Great War is a collection of essays examining literary responses to the Great War, particularly the confrontation of two distinct languages.
One of these reflects nineteenth-century ideals of war as a noble sacrifice; the other portrays the hopeless, brutal reality of the trenches.
The ultimate aim of this volume is to convey and reinforce the notion that no explicit literary language can ever be regarded as the definitive language of the Great War, nor can it ever hope to represent this conflict in its entirety. The collection also uncovers how memory constantly develops, triggering distinct and even contradictory responses from those involved in the complex process of remembering.

Contributors: Donna Coates, Brian Dillon, Monique Dumontet, Dorothea Flothow, Elizabeth Galway, Laurie Kaplan, Sara Martín Alegre, Silvia Mergenthal, Andrew Monnickendam, David Owen, Andrew Palmer, Bill Phillips, Cristina Pividori, Esther Pujolrás-Noguer, Richard Smith