Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 6,643 items for :

  • Applied Linguistics x
  • Languages and Linguistics x
Clear All
Temporal and geographical dynamics of theorization
Volume Editors: Luc van Doorslaer and Ton Naaijkens
In The Situatedness of Translation Studies, Luc van Doorslaer and Ton Naaijkens critically reassess some outdated views about Translation Studies, and demonstrate that translation theory is far more diverse than its usual representation as a Western scholarly tradition arising from the 1970s onwards. They present ten chapters about lesser-known conceptualizations of translation and translation theory in various cultural contexts, such as Chinese, Estonian, Greek, Russian and Ukrainian. This book shows that so-called ‘modern’ arguments about translation practice encompassing much more than a linguistic phenomenon, can, in fact, be dated back and connected to several precursors, such as semiotics or transfer theory. In doing so, it theorizes and localizes discussions about perceptions of translation and Translation Studies as a discipline.

Contributors: Yves Gambier, Iryna Odrekhivska, Elin Sütiste & Silvi Salupere, Shaul Levin, Feng Cui, Natalia Kamovnikova, Anastasia Shakhova, George Floros & Simos Grammenidis, Anne Lange, Luc van Doorslaer & Ton Naaijkens.
Approaches to Translation Studies is an international series promoting the scholarly study of translation. The notion of plural ‘approaches’ to translation and its study calls up images of scholarly explorers following untrodden paths to translation, or more cautiously (re)tracing the familiar routes. Either way, it indicates a refusal to be tied to dogma or prejudice, a curiosity about possible new vistas, and an awareness that the observer’s view depends on where s/he comes from. But a recognition of the plurality of possible approaches does not necessarily mean passive acquiescence to relativism and scepticism. The idea of ‘approaching’ translation also implies a sense of purpose and direction.

In the context of today’s globalised and pluralised world, this metaphorically suggested perspective is perhaps more relevant than ever before. The series therefore remains fully committed to it, while trying to respond to the rapid changes of our digital age. Ready to travel between genres, media and technologies, willing to span centuries and continents, and always keeping an open mind about the various oppositions that have too often needlessly divided researchers (e.g. high culture versus popular culture, linguistics versus literary studies versus cultural studies, translation ‘proper’ versus ‘adaptation’), the series Approaches to Translation Studies will continue to accommodate all translation-oriented books that match high-quality scholarship with an equal concern for reader-friendly communication.

Approaches to Translation Studies is open to a wide range of scholarly publications in the field of Translation Studies (monographs, collective volumes…). Dissertations are welcome but will obviously need to be thoroughly adapted to their new function and readership. Conference proceedings and collections of articles will only be considered if they show strong thematic unity and tight editorial control. For practical reasons, the series intends to continue its tradition of publishing English-language research. While students, teachers and scholars in the various schools and branches of Translation Studies make up its primary readership, the series also aims to promote a dialogue with readers and authors from various neighbouring disciplines.

Approaches to Translation Studies was launched in 1970 by James S Holmes (1924-1986), who was also one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Translation Studies as an academic discipline. At later stages the series’ editorship passed into the hands of Raymond van den Broeck, Kitty M. van Leuven-Zwart and Ton Naaijkens. Being the very first international series specifically catering for the needs of the fledgling discipline in the 1970s, Approaches to Translation Studies has played a significant historical role in providing it with a much needed platform as well as giving it greater visibility in the academic marketplace.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Volumes 2, 4, and 5 were published by Van Gorcum (Assen, The Netherlands), but orders should be directed to Brill | Rodopi.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
The chapters collected in the volume Passives Cross-Linguistically provide analyses of passive constructions across different languages and populations from the interface perspectives between syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. The contributions are, in principle, all based on the background of generative grammatical theory. In addition to the theoretical contributions of the first part of this volume, all solidly built on rich empirical bases, some experimental works are presented, which explore passives from a psycholinguistic perspective based on theoretical insights. The languages/language families covered in the contributions include South Asian languages (Odia/Indo-Aryan and Telugu/Dravidian, but also Kharia/Austro-Asiatic), Japanese, Arabic, English, German, Modern Greek, and several modern Romance varieties (Catalan, Romanian, and especially southern Italian dialects) as well as Vedic Sanskrit and Ancient Greek.
Author: Gereon Müller

Abstract

In this paper, an analysis of long-distance passives in German is developed according to which these constructions basically emerge from the co-occurrence of (i) passivization and (ii) restructuring in the language. Based on Müller (2016) and Müller (2017a), I assume that passivization and restructuring both involve an operation of structure removal in the course of the derivation—of an external argument DP in the first case, and of CP and TP layers of an infinitive in the second case. The null hypothesis that I would like to pursue against this background is that a combination of the two structure removal operations gives rise to the intricate properties of long-distance passives in German. A core feature of the analysis is that it does not involve any long-distance relation at any point; argument demotion, case assignment, and morphological realization as passive all take place extremely locally. Another basic property of the structure removal approach, which sets it apart from most other analyses, is that all DP arguments selected by the verbs involved (including in particular external arguments in the embedded and matrix domains) can be assumed to be structurally represented at some point of the derivation.

In: Passives Cross-Linguistically
Author: Peter Hallman

Abstract

In this chapter, I claim that the English participial suffix -EN (as in written, closed, etc.) is the default inflection for English verbs when no other suffix is selected by the verb’s immediate syntactic environment, explaining the occurrence of -EN in a puzzlingly heterogeneous variety of contexts. Contrary to previous literature, I argue against any role for -EN in passivization. I claim instead that the auxiliary be is critically involved in marking the lack of agentivity in English passives. Even this aspect of the passive construction is a relatively superficial feature of English though, since it does not hold in languages that express passive synthetically as a verbal inflection, rather than analytically.

In: Passives Cross-Linguistically

Abstract

It is well known from cross-linguistic literature that non-active structures, characterized by argument structure alternation, manifest huge variation (Lekakou 2005, Kallulli 2006, Alexiadou and Doron 2012, Alexiadou 2014 among others). In this paper, we compare non-active structures across two typologically distinct, but geographically proximate South Asian Languages (henceforth SAL s)—Odia (Indo-Aryan) and Telugu (Dravidian). Both Odia and Telugu have a similar bi-partite voice system, with non-actives (middles, anticausatives and medio-passives) appearing with passive morphology, and reflexives appearing in the active voice. They however differ in other respects. Odia passives and non-actives are unambiguously unaccusatives, while Telugu passives oscillate between unergative and unaccusative structures, and non-actives mostly show unaccusative properties. Another particularly interesting feature of Telugu is that its non-actives have an implicit agentive reading, even in the presence of unaccusative light verbs—this possibility however does not exist for passives selecting the same light verb. We contend that these macro-variations emerge from structural differences between the two languages. Odia passives and non-actives have a vP, which is always unaccusative with either an [+activity] or a [+causer] feature. On the other hand, Telugu passives and non-actives have a voiceP that hosts an implicit agent—which in turn selects a [+activity] or [+cause] v, yielding the observed variation amongst the two types of constructions. In general, our contention is that cross-linguistic morphological and semantic differences among non-actives result from voice/v differences, with richer and more elaborate voicePs imparting more variety to the concerned languages. In the end, we show how our analysis applies effectively to non-actives of another South Asian language Kharia (Austro-Asiatic).

In: Passives Cross-Linguistically
Author: Adam Ledgeway

Abstract

The canonical be-passive in the dialects of southern Italy is not a particularly common structure, especially when the surface subject is animate and/or the agent by-phrase is overtly expressed, giving rise at best to marginal results. In their place are typically preferred active structures involving clitic left-dislocation of the theme. Nonetheless, these same dialects exceptionally make very frequent use of the canoncial be-passive when embedded under the subject control predicate volere ‘want’. However, not only are be-passives, with animate surface subjects (including overt agent by-phrases), hugely improved when embedded under volere, but indirect object passives are also licensed, despite the fact that recipient passives prove entirely ungrammatical in root clauses. In what follows, we investigate why be-passives attain full grammaticality under volere and how such embedding also exceptionally gives rising to the full grammaticality of indirect object passives which otherwise prove ungrammatical. Among other things, the analysis explores the nature of the structural and inherent Case distinction in the dialects of southern Italy, the variation witnessed among dialects in the role of participle agreement and the presence of the passive auxiliary be in licensing indirect object passivization, how such minimal differences in agreement give rise to differing locality conditions operating on A-movement, and the role of subject control on licensing indirect object passives.

In: Passives Cross-Linguistically
Author: Arhonto Terzi

Abstract

Passive sentences are known to be acquired late by children and to pose problems for agrammatics crosslinguistically. In this paper I present data from Greek-speaking individuals that belong to these two groups, but do not follow the expected pattern. Children were found to fall seriously behind on the passives of run-of-the-mill transitive verbs but do exceptionally well on the passives of reflexive verbs, while the passives of both types of verbs were relatively spared for agrammatics.

I consider this behavior to be primarily the consequence of language-specific properties of passives. Greek passives are synthetic, and are formed via inflectional morphology of the verb. The same morphology is shared by reflexives, as well as middles, and unaccusatives. I propose that what renders children’s passives of transitive verbs difficult is that their syntactic subject has a theme theta role. Reflexive verbs have such subjects as part of their argument structure, so no difficulty arises for children when they are faced with the passives of these verbs. Reflexive verbs are not reported to pose problems for agrammatic aphasics crosslinguistically. I hold that the morphology they share with passives in Greek renders the theme subject of the latter a familiar configuration, this is why no particular difficulties arise for the passives of Greek-speaking agrammatics.

In: Passives Cross-Linguistically
Author: Mohamed Naji

Abstract

It is commonly assumed in the literature that anticausative verbs are located in Voice. Based on data from Standard Arabic, we will show in this article that anticausativity and Voice are different. We will argue that anticausative verbs are merged in an independent, autonomous, head Caus°(ative). We will then present morphosyntactic and also pure syntactic arguments to support our claim about the existence of CausP(hrase) in the lower field of the morphosyntactic structure.

In: Passives Cross-Linguistically
Author: Akemi Matsuya

Abstract

This paper has three goals. The first is to reanalyze Japanese passives from formal and functional perspectives. The second is to demonstrate that semantic characteristics of ni-passives (ni-direct and ni-indirect passives) are produced by grammatical nominalization on VoiceP motivated by metonymy in derivation, following Shibatani (2017, 2018a, 2018b). It is also said that ni-yotte passives, which are semantically neutral, are derived without nominalization and VoiceP. Third, it is proposed that CP nominalization triggered by metonymy enables the speaker’s emotional implications, under Grohmann’s (1999) derivation of root infinitives.

In: Passives Cross-Linguistically