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Whiggish International Law

Elihu Root, the Monroe Doctrine, and International Law in the Americas

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Christopher R. Rossi

International law’s turn to history in the Americas receives invigorated refreshment with Christopher Rossi’s adaptation of the insightful and inter-disciplinary teachings of the English School and Cambridge contextualists to problems of hemispheric methodology and historiography. Rossi sheds new light on abridgments of history and the propensity to construct and legitimize whiggish understandings of international law based on simplified tropes of liberal and postcolonial treatments of the Monroe Doctrine. Central to his story is the retelling of the Monroe Doctrine by its supreme early twentieth century interlocutor, Elihu Root and other like-minded internationalists. Rossi’s revival of whiggish international law cautions against the contemporary tendency to re-read history with both eyes cast on the ideological present as a justification for misperceived historical sequencing.

The 1624 Tumult of Mexico in Perspective (c. 1620–1650)

Authority and Conflict Resolution in the Iberian Atlantic

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Angela Ballone

In The 1624 Tumult of Mexico in Perspective Angela Ballone offers, for the first time, a comprehensive study of an understudied period of Mexican early modern history. By looking at the mandates of three viceroys who, to varying degrees, participated in the events surrounding the Tumult, the book discusses royal authority from a transatlantic perspective that encompasses both sides of the Iberian Atlantic. Considering the similarities and tensions that coexisted in the Iberian Atlantic, Ballone offers a thorough reassessment of current historiography on the Tumult proving that, despite the conflicts and arguments underlying the disturbances, there was never any intention to do away with the king’s authority in New Spain.

Marxism and Criminology

A History of Criminal Selectivity

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Valeria Vegh Weis

Winner of the 2017 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award

In Marxism and Criminology: A History of Criminal Selectivity, Valeria Vegh Weis rehabilitates the contributions and the methodology of Marx and Engels to analyze crime and punishment through the historical development of capitalism (15th Century to the present) in Europe and in the United States. The author puts forward the concepts of over-criminalization and under-criminalization to show that the criminal justice system has always been selective. Criminal injustice, the book argues, has been an inherent element of the founding and reproduction of a capitalist society. At a time when racial profiling, prosecutorial discretion, and mass incarceration continue to defy easy answers, Vegh Weis invites us to revisit Marx and Engels’ contributions to identify socio-economic and historic patterns of crime and punishment in order to foster transformative changes to criminal justice. The book includes a Foreword by Professor Roger Matthews of Kent University, and an Afterword written by Professor Jonathan Simon of the University of California, Berkeley.

Ownership Paradigms in American Civil Law Jurisdictions

Manifestations of the Shifts in the Legislation of Louisiana, Chile, and Argentina (16th-20th Centuries)

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Agustín Parise

In Ownership Paradigms in American Civil Law Jurisdictions Agustín Parise assists in identifying the transformations experienced in the legislation dealing with ownership in the Americas, thereby showing that current understandings are not uncontested dogmas.
This book is the result of research undertaken on both sides of the Atlantic, and covers the 16th to 20th centuries. Agustín Parise offers readers a journey across time and space, by studying three American civil law jurisdictions in three successive time periods. His book first highlights the added value that comparative legal historical studies may bring to Europe and the Americas. It then addresses, in chronological order, the three ownership paradigms (i.e., Allocation, Liberal, and Social Function) that he claims have developed in the Americas.