Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • Social Sciences x
  • Global Studies x
  • International Law: General Interest x
Clear All
In Children and the Responsibility to Protect, Bina D’Costa and Luke Glanville bring together more than a dozen academics and practitioners from around the world to examine the intersections of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) principle and the theory and practice of child protection. Contributors consider themes including how the agency and vulnerability of children is represented and how their voices are heard in discussions of R2P and child protection, and the merits of drawing together the R2P and Children and Armed Conflict (CAAC) agendas, as well as case studies of children’s lives in conflict zones, child soldiers, and children born of conflict-related sexual violence.

This collection of essays was first published in the journal Global Responsibility to Protect (vol.10/1-2, 2018) as a special issue.

Contributors are: J. Marshall Beier, Letícia Carvalho, Bina D’Costa, Myriam Denov, Luke Glanville, Michelle Godwin, Erin Goheen Glanville, Cecilia Jacob, Dustin Johnson, Atim Angela Lakor, Katrina Lee-Koo, Ryoko Nakano, Jochen Prantl, Jeremy Shusterman, Hannah Sparwasser Soroka, Timea Spitka, Jana Tabak, Shelly Whitman.
This collective volume draws on the themes of intersectionality and overlapping policy universes to examine and evaluate the shifting functions, frames and multiple actors and instruments of an ongoing and revitalized cooperation in EU external migration and asylum policies with third states. The contributions are based on problem-driven research and seek to develop bottom-up, policy-oriented solutions, while taking into account global, EU-based and local perspectives, and the shifting universes of EU migration, border and asylum policies. In 15 chapters, we explore the multifaceted dimensions of the EU external migration policy and its evolution in the post-crisis, geopolitical environment of the Global Compacts.
An International Human Rights Law Approach
In Feminicides of Girl Children in the Family Context: An International Human Rights Law Approach, Clara Chapdelaine-Feliciati examines the issue of feminicide, more specifically female infanticide, and the extent to which it is addressed under international law. For this purpose, she explores the origins of son preference and ‘daughter devaluation’, and the myriad factors that underpin female infanticide. Legal semiotics is employed to analyse legislation and case law, and assess whether the provisions of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights(ICCPR 1966) sufficiently protect girl children. Amendments to the ICCPR are proposed to clarify States parties’ duty of due diligence and ensure that the crime of female infanticide is effectively prohibited, investigated, and prosecuted.
A Subtle Game of Diplomatic Slap
In Symbolic Insult in Diplomacy: A Subtle Game of Diplomatic Slap, Alisher Faizullaev describes how states and their representatives may use manipulative practices for influencing the opponent. The author distinguishes three forms of using symbolic insult in diplomacy: by misrecognition (“diplomatic bypassing”), direct confrontation (“diplomatic punch”), and concealed verbal or nonverbal actions (“diplomatic slap”). The book focuses on “diplomatic slap” – employing obscure symbolic insult as a means of tacit manipulation. Analyzing historical and modern cases, Alisher Faizullaev shows that implicit symbolic insult usually appears ambiguously, and allows the offender to stay engaged with the victim. This work reveals vailed aspects of diplomatic practices and represents a valuable source for students and practitioners of international politics and diplomacy.
In Parliamentary Diplomacy in European and Global Governance, 27 experts from all over the world analyse the fast-expanding phenomenon of parliamentary diplomacy. Through a wealth of empirical case studies, the book demonstrates that parliamentarians and parliamentary assemblies have an increasingly important international role. The volume begins with parliamentary diplomacy in Europe, because the European Parliament is one of the strongest autonomous institutional actors in world politics. The study then examines parliamentary diplomacy in relations between Europe and third countries or regions (Mexico, Turkey, Russia, the Mediterranean), before turning attention to the rest of the world: North and South America, Asia, Africa and Australia. This pioneering volume confirms the worldwide nature and salience of parliamentary diplomacy in contemporary global politics.
In this work Laura Westra draws our attention to the failure of international law to promote and protect the rights of society in the face of the ravages of neoliberal agendas in an era of globalization. This book outlines how international law is perhaps a misnomer, and at its core there is a great distance between laws as they are written and laws as they are implemented. Each chapter in this volume peels back the illusions of laws as instruments designed to protect the public welfare, and shows how the intersection of globalization and neoliberal democracy has stripped people of their dignity, has violated human rights, has resulted in ecological disaster, all for the singular goal of profit and in the name of so-called economic rationality. Westra demonstrates how documents like national constitutions, with its eloquent language on the rights of its citizens, are cast aside when it comes to defending those rights. Calling international law a failed enterprise, the heart of this book explores how we may yet reconstruct a true system of international rights enforced by real international laws, and contemplates the limitations and possibilities of international organizations to effectively address truly international problems. Through the lens of what might be called a political ecology Westra offers us a call for action to protect our environments and indeed our selves.