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Edited by Jeremy Gunn, Jeroen Temperman and Malcolm D. Evans

As the tensions involving religion and society increase, the European Court of Human Rights and the Freedom of Religion or Belief is the first systematic analysis of the first twenty-five years of European Court's religion jurisprudence. The Court is one of the most significant institutions confronting the interactions among states, religious groups, minorities, and dissenters. In the 25 years since its first religion case, Kokkinakis v. Greece, the Court has inserted itself squarely into the international human rights debate regarding the freedom of religion or belief. The authors demonstrate the positive contributions and the significant flaws of the Court's jurisprudence involving religion, society, and secularism.
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Judiciary as Constituted Power

European Court History from Medieval Canon Law to ECHR

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Ulrike Juliane Maria Müßig

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Intergenerational Equity

Environmental and Cultural Concerns

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Edited by Thomas Cottier, Shaheeza Lalani and Clarence Siziba

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The Future of EU Criminal Justice Policy and Practice

Legal and Criminological Perspectives

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Edited by Jannemieke Ouwerkerk, Jacob Öberg, Judit Altena, Samuli Miettinen and Annika Suominen

EU criminal justice is a fast developing and challenging area of EU law and policy that requires scholars from different disciplines to join forces. This book is a first attempt to establish such synergies. Coming from different angles, the authors deal with questions in the area of EU substantive criminal law, such as when criminalisation of conduct is an appropriate choice; how the process of (de)criminalisation could be advanced; what the role of evidence could be in this regard; and what consequences criminalisation decisions at EU level have for national legal orders. The book concludes with a demonstration of how similar issues arise in the field of procedural criminal law.
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Francisco Pascual-Vives

In Consensus-Based Interpretation of Regional Human Rights Treaties Francisco Pascual-Vives examines the central role played by the notion of consensus in the case law of the European and Inter-American Courts of Human Rights. As many other international courts and tribunals do, both regional human rights courts resort to this concept while undertaking an evolutive interpretation of the Rome Convention and the Pact of San José, respectively. The role exerted by the notion of consensus in this framework can be used not only to understand the evolving character of the rights and freedoms recognized by these international treaties, but also to reaffirm the international nature of these regional human rights courts.
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Edited by Barry Steiner

The essays in this book, originally published in a special issue of the journal International Negotiation (vol. 23.1, 2018), are intended to enhance America's ability to mediate Israel-Palestine conflict. Every American president for the last thirty years, down to Donald Trump, has chosen to engage in this effort. To help understand and evaluate these efforts, and to focus upon the more promising mediation directions, these essays analyze mediation options in detail.
I. William Zartman accentuates special challenges of third party mediation. Amira Schiff critiques John Kerry’s mediation effort made on behalf of the Obama Administration. Galia Golan outlines mediation requirements in light of past American mediation efforts. Walid Salem suggests a new paradigm centered upon symmetry rather than asymmetry to assist Israel-Palestine peacemaking. And Barry Steiner studies a specific mediation action proposal.
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Christian H. Kälin

In Ius Doni in International Law and EU Law, Dr. Christian H. Kälin establishes the concept of ius doni in the contemporary legal and political theorising of citizenship. Providing a comprehensive analysis of the subject, it discusses the legal and political concepts of citizenship. It also introduces a new term for what is already an increasingly common and accepted practice of granting citizenship on the basis of substantial contributions to the State. Consisting of two main parts – law and practice – the monograph analyses the ius doni concept in both international law and EU law, further tests its application in practice and establishes best practices among states. Finally, the book discusses the conceptual and practical implications for citizenship.
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Corruption and Targeted Sanctions

Law and Policy of Anti-corruption Entry Bans

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Anton Moiseienko

In Corruption and Targeted Sanctions, Anton Moiseienko analyses the blacklisting foreigners suspected of corruption and the prohibition of their entry into the sanctioning state from an international law perspective. The implications of such actions have been on the international agenda for years and have gained particular prominence with the adoption by the US and Canada of the so-called Magnitsky legislation in 2016. Across the Atlantic, several European states followed suit. The proliferation of anti-corruption entry sanctions has prompted a reappraisal of applicable human rights safeguards, along with issues of respect for official immunities and state sovereignty. On the basis of a comprehesive review of relevant law and policy, Anton Moiseienko identifies how targeted sanctions can ensure accountability for corruption while respecting international law.
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Social Rights of Children in Europe

A Case Law Study on Selected Rights

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Katharina Häusler

The Convention on the Rights of the Child has changed the paradigm of how (human rights) law looks at children: from “objects” of protection to full rights-holders of all human rights. Consequently, social rights are not voluntary welfare services but an expression of the dignity and rights of the child. In Social Rights of Children in Europe Katharina Häusler provides a thorough analysis of how these basic social rights are interpreted by the three major human rights bodies on the level of the Council of Europe and the European Union. It thus offers not only an excellent picture of the main lines of interpretation but also of the major gaps and challenges for the realisation of children’s social rights in Europe.
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Mark Chadwick

In Piracy and the Origins of Universal Jurisdiction, Mark Chadwick relates a colourful account of how and why piracy on the high seas came to be considered an international crime, subject to the principle of universal jurisdiction and prosecutable by any State in any circumstances.

Merging domestic and international law, history, literature and sociology, the author weaves an intricate tale that reveals the pirate to be the original “enemy of mankind” and forerunner of today’s international criminals: those who commit genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. In so doing, Mark Chadwick proposes a convincing reappraisal of the pirate’s role in the crystallisation of international criminal law, bringing much-needed clarity to a disputed area of international legal history.