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Bárbara Martínez Vilinsky

A comparable corpus of crime novels composed of a subcorpus of texts written originally in Spanish and a subcorpus of translations from American English into Spanish serves as a starting point and means for searching for differences and similarities between the ways in which dialogue is used as a narrative strategy in fiction in these two different communicative contexts. In order to do so, I will focus on aspects such as the proportion of dialogue and of dialogue tags present in both subcorpora and the degree of detail and informational load that is included in them, to find out whether they play a significant role in the development of the plot and the depiction of characters and situations. The corpus also includes a parallel subcorpus of original English novels which will help us establish whether the differences –or lack thereof– between the two components of the comparable Spanish corpus are due to the fact that the translator is aware or not of the influence of these variables, and alters them in any way in order to adjust to the Spanish communicative context.

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Jean Anderson

This study explores some of the issues and strategies related to the use of foreign language terms in dialogue in the context of “exotic” crime fiction, meaning crime fiction set in a country where an exotic language is spoken, a language other than that of the author (and presumed original reader), as opposed to the local or narrative language which is the main language of the original text, or featuring an “exotic” character. It surveys patterns of usage adopted by authors to create exotic atmosphere and language use (exoticisation), before analysing some of the strategies used by translators whose task it is to move such works into the formerly exotic language of the original (repatriation). Considering the English-French language pair, examples will be drawn from classic Agatha Christie and two more recent authors, Canadian Louise Penny and American Cara Black, who all choose French-speaking detectives, although in quite different contexts.

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Daniel Linder

In order to prevent the standardization of slang, Josep Elias i Cornet, Spanish translator of Chester Himes’s For Love of Imabelle (1957) overcompensated. So much additional slang was included in his Por amor a Imabelle, published in Editorial Bruguera’s classic Libro amigo series in 1980, that a translator’s prologue and glossary were introduced. Elias composed his version with the help of local underworld figure, Manuel Sánchez Torres, a.k.a. “el Palomo”, Curiously, Elias’s translation seems perfectly matched to the “absurdity” of the conditions under which Himes wrote the novel. Commissioned to write it by Gallimard’s Série Noire editor, Marcel Duhamel, Himes created Harlem cops, Coffin Ed Johnson and Grave Digger Jones, and certainly exaggerated their slang lexicon for the benefit of a French audience who only stereotypically envisioned black Harlem characters. However, the speech of main character Jackson, a prudish and devout “square” who only speaks in his “native dialect” when he is nervous and frightened, reveals some of the complexity of the speech universe of Himes’s characters. The article reveals that some cases of compensation of slang likely stemmed from the French version which Elias certainly consulted. The 2009 retranslation by Mª Dolores Ábalos is also discussed.

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Camino Gutiérrez Lanza

This paper aims to explore the way in which suspense has been created in one of the classic psychological thrillers of the 1960s, Roman Polanski’s first film in English Repulsion, and the way it has been recreated for the Spanish audience in dialogue translation. Drawing on the theoretical and methodological framework of Descriptive Translation Studies (particularly on the relevance of translations as cultural facts of the target culture and on the close relationships that can be established between texts and contexts). Repulsion constitutes a highly interesting object of study, especially from the point of view of the target context. The film reached the Spanish cinemas both in its subtitled and dubbed versions for both specialized and commercial circuits at two particularly interesting periods of time within Franco’s dictatorship: the period of socio-political aperture (1962-1969) and the final years of the regime (1970-1975). The fascinating socio-political and economic role played by both audiovisual translation types (subtitling and dubbing) in Spain during the sixties and seventies will also be examined in detail.

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Edited by Susanne M. Cadera and Anita Pavić Pintarić

The volume aims to be a reference work for all researchers interested in the study of fictional dialogue and its translation in suspense novels and films as well as in related genres. The volume also aims to determine the interplay between the creation of suspense and fictional dialogue. The particular interest in dialogue comes from the host of roles it plays in fiction. It helps create suspense and arouses a whole range of feelings in the reader or the audience related to the development of the plot.
Fictional dialogue is the discursive method of evoking orality, conferring authenticity and credibility on a plot and giving fictional characters a voice. As a narrative strategy, dialogue is an important resource that enables the writer to shape the character’s subjectivity. In thrillers the characters’ voice is part of the process of creating suspense, an element of uncertainty, anxiety and excitement, which is not exclusive to this genre. To clearly differentiate suspense from the tension created by other types of fiction, this volume aims to study the relationship between the characters’ voices and the building of suspense and to describe the translation difficulties arising from this particular interdependence.

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Edited by Susanne M. Cadera and Anita Pavic Pintaric

Series:

Jenny Brumme

The aim of this article is to study the translation of fictive orality in the specific genre of suspense. Crime fiction has experienced some substantial innovations in recent years. We find that contemporary thrillers tend to use highly differentiated language to enhance character portrayal and also employ more realistic conversational style in everyday dialogues. The challenges deriving from this new crime fiction are briefly outlined by some examples from Wolf Haas’s novels featuring Detective Brenner. Attention is paid to how suspense is generated in the Austrian source text and its translation into the target texts (English, French and Spanish). More specifically, the language awareness of the writer is related to the characteristics of the narrator’s voice (informal T-form and dialogue with the reader). The different empirical data observed in the ST and the TTs highlight the interplay between the devices of spoken language (truisms, telegraphic style) and strategies used in order to bolster the suspense (holding-up of the showdown, allusions, play on words).