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Gerald Lalonde

With Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War GoddessGerald V. Lalonde offers the first comprehensive history of the martial cult of Athena Itonia, from its origins in Greek prehistory to its demise in the Roman imperial age. The Itonian goddess appears first among the Thessalians and eventually as the patron deity of their famed cavalry. Archaic poets attest to "Athena, warrior goddess" and her festival games at the Itoneion near Boiotian Koroneia. The cult also came south to Athens, probably with the mounted Thessalian allies of Peisistratos. Hellenistic decrees from Amorgos tell of elaborate festival sacrifices to Athena Itonia, likely supplications for protection of the islanders and their maritime trade when piracy plagued the Cyclades after collapse of the Greek naval forces that policed the Aegean Sea. This will be an indispensable volume for all interested in the social, political, and military uses of ancient Greek religious cult and the geography, chronology, and circumstances of its propagation among Greek poleis and federations.

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Laurent Bricault

In Isis Pelagia: Images, Names and Cults of a Goddess of the Seas<>/i>, Laurent Bricault, one of the principal scholars of the cults of Isis, presents a new interpretation of the multiple sources that present Isis as a goddess of the seas. Bricault discusses a wealth of relatively unknown archaeological and textual data, drawing on a profound knowledge of their historical context.

After decades of scholarly study, Bricault offers an important contribution and a new phase in the debate on understanding the “diffusion” as well as the “reception” of the cults of Isis in the Graeco-Roman world. This book, the first English-language monograph by the leading French scholar in the field, underlines the importance of Isis Studies for broader debates in the study of ancient religion.

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Edited by John F. Finamore, Christina-Panagiota Manolea and Sarah Klitenic Wear

Studies in Hermias’ Commentary on Plato’s Phaedrus is a collection of twelve essays that consider aspects of Hermias’ philosophy, including his notions of the soul, logic, and method of exegesis. The essays also consider Hermias’ work in the tradition of Neoplatonism, particularly in relation to the thought of Iamblichus and Proclus. The collection grapples with the question of the originality of Hermias’ commentary—the only extant work of Hermias—which is a series of lectures notes of his teacher, Syrianus.

Early Christianity in Asia Minor and Cyprus

From the Margins to the Mainstream

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Edited by Stephen Mitchell and Philipp Pilhofer

This volume is part of the Berlin Topoi project re-examing the early Christian history of Asia Minor, Greece and the South Balkans, and is concerned with the emergence of Christianity in Asia Minor and in Cyprus. Five essays focus on the east Anatolian provinces, including a comprehensive evaluation of early Christianity in Cappadocia, a comparative study of the Christian poetry of Gregory of Nazianzus and his anonymous epigraphic contemporaries and three essays which pay special attention to the hagiography of Cappadocia and Armenia Minor. The remaining essays include a new analysis of the role of Constantinople in episcopal elections across Asia Minor, a detailed appraisal of the archaeological evidence from Sagalassus in Pisidia, a discussion of the significance of inscriptions in Carian sanctuaries through late antiquity, and a survey of Christian inscriptions from Cyprus.

A King and a Fool?

The Succession Narrative as a Satire

Series:

Virginia Miller

In A King and a Fool? The Succession Narrative as a Satire Virginia Miller applies a new version of Douglas Muecke’s taxonomy of irony to the Succession Narrative. She argues that the narrative in 2 Samuel and 1 Kings has the essential feature of satire, namely, a pervasive sense of pejoratively critical irony. By her account, King David is the object of ironic attack, and therefore, an object of condemnation. Given that the primary purpose of satire is reform, Miller claims that the purpose of the Succession Narrative is a call for reform in the leadership of Israel.

Edited by Gary Gurtler and Daniel P. Maher

This volume, the thirty-fourth year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2017-18. Paper topics include: the nature of unity in the Parmenides; the role of generation in understanding the priority of activity in Aristotle’s Metaphysics; the relation of language and craft in Plato’s critique of sophistry; the ambiguous place of pity for one’s slave in the Epicurean sage’s hedonistic egoism; using the distinction of praising and prizing as pointing toward the higher status of happiness to virtue in NE X.6-8. The commentators do their work in challenging some of these claims and supporting others. Contributors are Kelly Arenson, Daniel Gardner, David Horan, Colin King, Max Latona, D.C. Schindler, Mark Sentesy, Daniel Shartin, Susan Stark and Jan Szaif.

Edited by Gary Gurtler and Daniel P. Maher

This volume, the thirty-fourth year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2017-18. Paper topics include: the nature of unity in the Parmenides; the role of generation in understanding the priority of activity in Aristotle’s Metaphysics; the relation of language and craft in Plato’s critique of sophistry; the ambiguous place of pity for one’s slave in the Epicurean sage’s hedonistic egoism; using the distinction of praising and prizing as pointing toward the higher status of happiness to virtue in NE X.6-8. The commentators do their work in challenging some of these claims and supporting others. Contributors are Kelly Arenson, Daniel Gardner, David Horan, Colin King, Max Latona, D.C. Schindler, Mark Sentesy, Daniel Shartin, Susan Stark and Jan Szaif.

Religion in Ephesos Reconsidered

Archaeology of Spaces, Structures, and Objects

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Edited by Daniel Schowalter, Sabine Ladstätter, Steven J. Friesen and Christine Thomas

Religion in Ephesos Reconsidered provides a detailed overview of the current state of research on the most important Ephesian projects offering evidence for religious activity during the Roman period. Ranging from huge temple complexes to hand-held figurines, this book surveys a broad scope of materials. Careful reading of texts and inscriptions is combined with cutting-edge archaeological and architectural analysis to illustrate how the ancient people of Ephesos worshipped both the traditional deities and the new gods that came into their purview. Overall, the volume questions traditional understandings of material culture in Ephesos, and demonstrates that the views of the city and its inhabitants on religion were more complex and diverse than has been previously assumed.

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Edited by Claudia D. Bergmann and Benedikt Kranemann

Ritual Dynamics in Jewish and Christian Contexts investigates questions that arise in modern ritual studies concerning Jewish and Christian religious communities: How did their religious rituals develop? Where did different ritual communities and their ritual texts interact? How did religious communities and their authoritative texts respond to change, and how did change influence religious rituals? The volume is a product of the interdisciplinary and international research efforts taken by the Research Centre “Dynamics of Jewish Ritual Practices in Pluralistic Contexts from Antiquity to the Present” at the Universität Erfurt (Germany) and unites the voices of important senior and emerging scholars in the field. It focuses on antiquity and the medieval period but also considers examples from the early modern and modern period in Europe

Edited by Jonathan Burgess, Jonathan L. Ready and Christos C. Tsagalis

Volume 3 of Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic explores interconnections between the Odyssey and the Nostoi and the Telegony of the Epic Cycle, a collection of lost early Greek epics. The Odyssey is situated between the narrative time of the two Cycle poems, with the Nostoi narrating the returns of heroes after the Trojan War and the Telegony narrating Odysseus’s adventures after his return to Ithaca. The six articles that follow the introduction compare and contrast the three epics, employing different methodologies and reaching divergent conclusions. Topics include pre-Homeric mythological traditions, the potential for intertextuality between orally performed epics, and the flexible boundaries of early epics.