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Edited by Francesco Venturi

This volume investigates the various ways in which writers comment on, present, and defend their own works, and at the same time themselves, across early modern Europe. A multiplicity of self-commenting modes, ranging from annotations to explicatory prose to prefaces to separate critical texts and exemplifying a variety of literary genres, are subjected to analysis. Self-commentaries are more than just an external apparatus: they direct and control reception of the primary text, thus affecting notions of authorship and readership. With the writer understood as a potentially very influential and often tendentious interpreter of their own work, the essays in this collection offer new perspectives on pre-modern and modern forms of critical self-consciousness, self-representation, and self-validation.

Contributors are Harriet Archer, Gilles Bertheau, Carlo Caruso, Jeroen De Keyser, Russell Ganim, Joseph Harris, Ian Johnson, Richard Maber, Martin McLaughlin, John O’Brien, Magdalena Ożarska, Federica Pich, Brian Richardson, Els Stronks, and Colin Thompson.

Edited by Geert Lernout

No other modernist writer in English has attracted more or broader international attention than James Joyce. Translations, adaptations, and imitations as well as works of criticism are being published in increasing numbers and frequency, and show a proliferating diversity of approaches and perspectives on the work, life, and influence of Joyce.
In view of the internationalism of Joyce studies, and the current dissemination of literary-critical pluralism, this peer-reviewed series hopes to offer a platform for specifically "European" perspectives on Joyce's works, their adaptations, annotation, and translation, studies in biography, the history of and current debates in Joyce criticism, Joyce's place in literary history, matters of influence and the transmission of ideas etc.
In calling this series "European" in the broadest sense, we aim at soliciting not only the submission of articles by European contributors, but more generally all essays and research focusing on issues of European concern such as language, nationality and culture, literary-historical movements, ideology, politics, and distribution, as well as literary-critical perspectives with European roots.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.

The Beast in the Mosquito

The Correspondence of Ronald Ross & Patrick Manson

Series:

Edited by W.F. Bynum and Caroline Overy

The correspondence between Sir Ronald Ross (1857-1932) and Sir Patrick Manson (1844-1922) is rich in both scientific and human terms. It records, in great detail, Ross's research in India between 1895 and 1899, which elucidated the role of mosquitoes in the transmission of malaria, work for which Ross was awarded the 1902 Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology. Ross described the mosquito-transmission theory as Manson's 'Grand Induction', and he had returned to India, where he was an officer in the Indian Medical Service, having been primed by Manson. Ross's regular letters to his mentor document the frustrations and false trails as well as the excitement of discovery. Manson in turn acted as a kind of agent in London, publicising his findings, offering advice and seeking to use his influence to secure for Ross the working conditions he so desired.
These 173 letters, plus 85 from the two decades after Ross's return to Britain also record the rise and full of a relationship, as Ross's preoccupation with his place in the history of malariology led to a breach between the two men. Themes of priority, nationalism, and personal vanity punctuate this latter correspondence, which also reveals new insights about the golden years of tropical medicine.
Ross included some of the correspondence in his Memoirs, but most of it appears here, fully annotated, for the first time.

Edited by Geert Lernout

No other modernist writer in English has attracted more or broader international attention than James Joyce. Translations, adaptations, and imitations as well as works of criticism are being published in increasing numbers and frequency, and show a proliferating diversity of approaches and perspectives on the work, life, and influence of Joyce.
In view of the internationalism of Joyce studies, and the current dissemination of literary-critical pluralism, this peer-reviewed series hopes to offer a platform for specifically "European" perspectives on Joyce's works, their adaptations, annotation, and translation, studies in biography, the history of and current debates in Joyce criticism, Joyce's place in literary history, matters of influence and the transmission of ideas etc.
In calling this series "European" in the broadest sense, we aim at soliciting not only the submission of articles by European contributors, but more generally all essays and research focusing on issues of European concern such as language, nationality and culture, literary-historical movements, ideology, politics, and distribution, as well as literary-critical perspectives with European roots.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.