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Miles Orvell and Jeffrey L. Meikle

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Edited by Miles Orvell and Jeffrey L. Meikle

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Louise Westling

Addressing problems of humanism and hierarchy in Heidegger’s concept of dwelling, this essay will attempt to show how Merleau-Ponty, in dialogue Heidegger, restores humans to their place within the living world of Brute or Wild Being that transcends us. Rather than seeing humans as the only beings capable of Dasein, the only ones for whom Being comes into presence as Heidegger does, Merleau-Ponty asserts the plenitude of Being active within the whole flesh of the world. For him, ‘dwelling’ would be an intertwining within an historical unfolding congruent with biological evolution and the insights of modern physics. Creativity is then the unfolding, ever novel form of Being which includes earth and its denizens, as well as the cosmos. A post-humanist ecological ethics can be shaped from Heidegger’s ideas of the ‘saving grace’ possible in human caring, but adapted according to Merleau-Ponty’s perspective, to participate within the larger community of kindred beings in our biosphere, who also may be understood as having agency and sentience.

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Edited by Fiona Becket and Gifford Terry

Culture, Creativity and Environment

New Environmentalist Criticism

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Edited by Ian Beckett and Terry Gifford

Culture, Creativity and Environment: New Environmentalist Criticism is a collection of new work which examines the intersection between philosophy, literature, visual art, film and the environment at a time of environmental crisis. This book is unusual in the way in which the ‘imaginative’, ‘creative’, element is privileged, notwithstanding the creativity of rigorous cultural criticism. Genuinely interdisciplinary, this book aims to be inclusive in its discussions of diverse cultural media (different literary genres, art forms and film for instance), which offer thoughtful and thought-provoking critiques of our relationships with the environment. Our ability to transcend the ethical and aesthetic categories and discourses that have contributed to our alienation from our environment is dependant upon an enlargement of our imaginative capacities. In a modest way this book might contribute to what Ted Hughes, speaking of the imagination of each new child, described as “nature’s chance to correct culture’s error”.