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This selected translation of Blue Book of Chinese Education 2016 reviews China’s education development in 2015. Chapter one offers an overview. Chapters two to four examine rural education in China, including the education of the left-behind children, compulsory education in rural areas, and the working condition of rural teachers. Chapters five to eleven cover educational services, education reform, non-governmental education, training program for teachers, teaching of traditional Chinese culture, the basic values of high-school students, and school bullying. The last three chapters are survey reports of compulsory education development in Chinese cities, math and science education for ethnic minority populations, and education authorities’ attitudes toward reform. The seven appendices provide important supplementary materials.
Volume Editor: Yunxiang Yan
Chinese Families Upside Down offers the first systematic account of how intergenerational dependence is redefining the Chinese family. The authors make a collective effort to go beyond the conventional model of filial piety to explore the rich, nuanced, and often unexpected new intergenerational dynamics. Supported by ethnographic findings from the latest field research, novel interpretations of neo-familism address critical issues from fresh perspectives, such as the ambivalence in grandparenting, the conflicts between individual and family interests, the remaking of the moral self in the face of family crises, and the decisive influence of the Chinese state on family change. The book is an essential read for scholars and students of China studies in particular and for those who are interested in the present-day family and kinship in general.

Abstract

Herders-farmers violent conflicts and flare-ups have spread throughout central and southern communities in Nigeria, but exclude the urban areas. I examine ‘herders – urban residents’ conflicts. Herders roam their cattle from outskirts to city roads, disrupting traffic and leaving behind trails of excrement and offensive smells causing dangerous nuisance. I argue that the new practice of cattle herders’ encroachments on city roads poses some socio-economic risks such as environmental decay, air pollution, displacement of urban livelihoods, road accidents and non-violent conflicts. Primary data was elicited from herders and residents in four major cities in Nigeria such as Aba, Awka, Nsukka and Owerri. I conclude by reflecting on the consequences of these socio-economic and environment-related risk factors which combine to undermine the attainment of Sustainable Development Goals (SDG s), and proffer solutions to address them. I make forecast in the form of early warning system that; cattle herders – urban residents cantankerous and confrontational interrelationships (though ‘non-violent conflicts’) could escalate and implode into dangerous ‘violent conflict’ scenarios if neglected.

In: African and Asian Studies

Abstract

This study investigates demand for real money balances in Africa using panel time-series data from Nigeria and Ghana between 1970 and 2014. The study employs Levin, Lin, Chu common unit root process and Pedroni Residual Cointegration Test which the results reveal that all the variables in the model are stationary and cointegrated respectively. Data sourced from the World Development Indicators (WDI) were analyzed using Panel Two-Stage Estimated Generalized Least Squares (cross-section Seemingly Unrelated Regression model (SURE)) with Instrumental Variables (IV). The results conform to the liquidity preference theory, with all the variables – inflation, real interest rates, and official exchange rates are statistically significant except real income. It is recommended that the monetary authorities in Africa especially the economies of Nigeria and Ghana should adopt appropriate monetary policies by placing interest rates, inflation and official exchange rates at acceptable levels to boost income through private sector investments.

In: African and Asian Studies

Abstract

What do Malaysians understand by the term, “intellectual”? Is the intellectual in the Malaysian context undefined, or insignificant? Do Malaysians see the need for intellectuals? Answers to these questions reflect the extant to which Malaysia has advanced in her post-colonial development. Amidst the race towards IR 4.0 and Society 5.0, Malaysia’s education system lags behind and leaders continue to be embroiled in identity politics. Syed Hussein Alatas, a world-renowned Malaysian intellectual, raised these questions in the 1950s. His writings focus on social change, corruption, and intellectual captivity. Even though his writings are easily accessible, his ideas have not been widely assimilated by Malaysia’s ruling elite, as part of the reform agenda. This article highlights the relevance of Alatas’s ideas in Malaysia’s current socio-political transformation. It concludes that leadership’s failure to identify relevant problems is because they have neglected the vital role of intellectuals, such as the critical ideas of Syed Hussein Alatas.

In: Asian Journal of Social Science
In: Asian Journal of Social Science

Abstract

Policy legacies are an important factor explaining how, regardless of the nontraditional discourse, previously implemented laws and policies have greatly influenced the state of eldercare arrangements in both China and Taiwan. On the one hand, Taiwan has been shifting eldercare responsibilities from the family to the public through a series of social policy reforms fueled by political demands from the civil society since its democratic transition, whereas the Chinese Party-State enacted a series of filial laws in addition to reform policies, which inflated the demand and supply for familial care while at the same time impacting the development of institutional eldercare. While the issue often framed as the prevalence of filial culture in Chinese societies, this article argues, through a path dependency-based perspective, that legal provisions, policies and the structure of the political competition are largely responsible for shaping current eldercare arrangements on both sides of the strait.

In: Asian Journal of Social Science

Abstract

Cultural exchange between Pakistani and Chinese citizens increased after the launch of CPEC. Cooperation and understanding between the governments extended to collaboration and acceptance among the people. And people-to-people relations between the two sides strengthened. Students, artists, sportspersons, businesspeople, professionals, and workers travelled and developed a rapport with locals. A detailed study of the Sahiwal coal power plant and nearby villages, comprising data collection through fieldwork, shows that despite cultural diversity, managers and workers from both sides accepted the cultural diversity and worked for mutual benefit. People working at the power plant exchanged material and non-material cultures with each other that helped them manage cultural diversity. And they strengthened cross-cultural relations, for their exchanges were rewarding and mutually beneficial.

In: Asian Journal of Social Science