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Identités françaises

Banlieues, féminités et universalisme

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Mame-Fatou Niang

Identités françaises interroge les notions de périphérisation et d’identité nationale à travers une étude de discours sur les banlieues françaises. L’exploration du quotidien, au détriment de l'extraordinaire, invite le lecteur à reconsidérer les représentations des périphéries, et les processus qui créent citoyenneté et marginalité dans la France républicaine. L'accent est porté sur des expériences féminines dans des œuvres produites par des écrivains et artistes issus de ces espaces. Cette attention éclaire les parcours de femmes qui concentrent un ensemble de marginalités socio-économiques ou raciales. L’étude de ces intersections illuminent de nombreuses notions d’inclusion et de périphérisation. En plein débats autour d’une identité nationale une et indivisible, l’œuvre de Mame-Fatou Niang illumine des identités plurielles ancrées dans les banlieues françaises.

Identités françaises interrogates notions of marginalization and national identity through an analysis of French banlieues. The display of the quotidian, at the expense of the extraordinary, invites the reader to reconsider the most common images of these urban peripheries and the processes that create citizenship and marginality in republican France. The focus is on the female experience, in works produced by writers and artists from these peripheries. Banlieue women sit at the intersection of marginalities of race, gender and class. The study of these intersections illuminates multiple notions of identity, belonging and peripheralization. Amid the contemporary flare-ups and debates around a single and indivisible French national identity, Mame-Fatou Niang’s work brings to light plural identities rooted in France’s suburban spaces.

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Edited by Richard Shusterman

Cities are defined by their complex network of busy streets and the multitudes of people that animate them through physical presence and bodily actions that often differ dramatically: elegant window-shoppers and homeless beggars, protesting crowds and patrolling police. As bodies shape city life, so the city’s spaces, structures, economies, politics, rhythms, and atmospheres reciprocally shape the urban soma. This collection of original essays explores the somaesthetic qualities and challenges of city life (in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas) from a variety of perspectives ranging from philosophy, urban theory, political theory, and gender studies to visual art, criminology, and the interdisciplinary field of somaesthetics. Together these essays illustrate the aesthetic, cultural, and political roles and trials of bodies in the city streets.

Bodies in Flux

Embodiments at the End of Anthropocentrism

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Edited by Barbara Braid and Hanan Muzaffar

This volume offers an insight into a selection of current issues of embodiment and other related aspects, such as identity, gender, disability, or sexuality, discussed on the basis of examples from contemporary culture and social life. Inspired by Donna Haraway’s concept of the cyborg as a transgressor of boundaries, the book examines fluidity of post-human bodies – from cyber relations to others and to self, enabled by the latest technologies, through fragmented, prostheticised, monstrous or augmented body of popular culture and lifestyles, to the dis/utopian fantasies offered by literary texts – showing how difficult it still is in current culture to let go of the stable boundaries towards the post-gender world Haraway imagines.

Contributors are Dawn Wooley, Anna Pilińska, Barbara Braid, Jana Reynolds, Julio Ernesto Guerrero Mondaca, Ana Gabriela Magallanes Rodríguez, Katharina Vester, Wojciech Śmieja and Hanan Muzaffar.

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Edited by Sarah Joan Moran and Amanda C. Pipkin

Women and Gender in the Early Modern Low Countries, 1500-1750 brings together research on women and gender across the Low Countries, a culturally contiguous region that was split by the Eighty Years' War into the Protestant Dutch Republic in the North and the Spanish-controlled, Catholic Hapsburg Netherlands in the South.
The authors of this interdisciplinary volume highlight women’s experiences of social class, as family members, before the law, and as authors, artists, and patrons, as well as the workings of gender in art and literature. In studies ranging from microhistories to surveys, the book reveals the Low Countries as a remarkable historical laboratory for its topic and points to the opportunities the region holds for future scholarly investigations.

Contributors: Martine van Elk, Martha Howell, Martha Moffitt Peacock, Sarah Joan Moran, Amanda Pipkin, Katlijne Van der Stighelen, Margit Thøfner, and Diane Wolfthal.

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Sarah Joan Moran and Amanda Pipkin