Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,030 items for :

  • Single Journal x
  • History of the Book x
  • Book History x
  • Early Modern History x
Clear All
Author: Lodovica Braida

Abstract

The transformation of a play composed for the stage into a text printed to be read is a complex operation often mentioned by the playwrights themselves in the prefaces to the editions of their works. The printed publication could become the ‘place’ for perfecting what was performed on stage but it could also, for some authors, become a ‘place’ in which they defended their authorship through the control of the editions, even going so far, in the case of Carlo Goldoni (Venice 1707-Paris 1793), as to break the rules of the book trade. The author attempts to show how the construction of Goldoni’s authorship can be analyzed on three different levels: the expression of the author’s will; his claim for the right to publish his works himself and finally the representation of the figure of the author with the use of a different portrait for each edition.

In: Quaerendo

Abstract

This article offers a critical inquiry of the compilation of inscriptions and their transmission through books and manuscripts. It focuses on a bundle of hand-written slips which record about fifty-two inscriptions from early modern Brussels and which offers a glimpse on the preparatory work for publishing a town description or history. Its title suggests that the authors have used the peripatetic method, an approach in which an author, in the course of a stroll around a place, lists and describes any interesting buildings and sites he encounters. The method seems very appropriate when it comes to collect the texts of public inscriptions in a city or town, since it is generally thought that such texts on buildings could be read by every passer-by. Yet, nonetheless the authors of the Brussels’ compilation certainly recorded texts while walking around in town, they apparently copied texts from existing books as well.

In: Quaerendo
In: Quaerendo

Abstract

In 1631 the Protestant town of Magdeburg fell to the Catholic Imperial army and was burned to the ground with casualties of some 20.000 people. This event reverberated far and wide in broadsheets and pamphlets, songs and images, and not only in Germany. The destruction of Magdeburg echoed in faraway Iceland, where pastor Guðmundur Erlendsson wrote a poem about the event. In this article we argue that news of the event (perhaps in the form of broadsides) must have arrived quite early to Iceland and travelled through the learned community around the diocese of Hólar in the northern region of Iceland. Furthermore, we explore the intentions of the poet and his observations and perceptions of the events. The poem was most likely intended to be sung or recited and was disseminated in handwritten copies. We explore the questions: Why produce a poem about atrocities in foreign lands? What was the lesson of the events in Magdeburg for peaceful Iceland?

In: Quaerendo
Forms, Formats and the Circulation of Knowledge explores the printscape – the mental mapping of knowledge in all its printed shapes – to chart the British networks of publishers, printers, copyright-holders, readers and authors. This transdisciplinary volume skilfully recovers innovations and practices in the book trade between 1688 and 1832. It investigates how print circulated information in a multitude of sizes and media, through an evolving framework of transactions. The authority of print is demonstrated by studies of prospectuses, blank forms, periodicals, pamphlets, globes, games and ephemera, uniquely gathered in eleven essays engaging in legal, economic, literary, and historical methodologies. The tight focus on material format reappraises a disorderly market accommodating a widening audience consumption.
The wide scholarly interests of Scots in the Restoration period are analysed by Murray Simpson through this in-depth study of the library of James Nairn (1629–1678), a Scottish parish minister. Nairn's collection demonstrates a remarkable receptivity to new intellectual ideas. At some two thousand titles Nairn’s is the biggest library formed in this period for which we have detailed and accurate records. The collection is analysed by subject. In addition, there is a biographical study and chapters investigating aspects of the Scottish book market and comparing other contemporary Scottish clerical libraries. A short-title catalogue of the collection, giving references to relevant online bibliographies and catalogues, a select provenance index and a subject index complete the work.
In: Forms, Formats and the Circulation of Knowledge
In: Forms, Formats and the Circulation of Knowledge
In: Forms, Formats and the Circulation of Knowledge
In: Forms, Formats and the Circulation of Knowledge