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Festivity and Representation in the Early Eighteenth Century
The 1720 Imperial Circumcision Celebrations in Istanbul offers the first holistic examination of an Ottoman public festival through an in-depth inquiry into different components of the 1720 event. Through a critical and combined analysis of the hitherto unknown archival sources along with the textual and pictorial narratives on the topic, the book vividly illustrates the festival’s organizational details and preparations, its complex rites (related to consumption, exchange, competition), and its representation in court-commissioned illustrated festival books (sūrnāmes).
To analyze all these phases in a holistic manner, the book employs an interdisciplinary approach by using the methodological tools of history, art history, and performance studies and thus, provides a new methodological and conceptual framework for the study of Ottoman celebrations.
A Companion to Music at the Habsburgs Courts in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, edited by Andrew H. Weaver, is the first in-depth survey of Habsburg musical patronage over a broad timeframe. Bringing together existing research and drawing upon primary sources, the authors, all established experts, provide overviews of the musical institutions, the functions of music, the styles and genres cultivated, and the historical, political, and cultural contexts for music at the Habsburg courts. The wide geographical scope includes the imperial courts in Vienna and Prague, the royal court in Madrid, the archducal courts in Graz and Innsbruck, and others. This broad view of Habsburg musical activities affirms the dynasty’s unique position in the cultural life of early modern Europe.

Contributors are Lawrence Bennett, Charles E. Brewer, Drew Edward Davies, Paula Sutter Fichtner, Alexander J. Fisher, Christine Getz, Beth L. Glixon, Jeffrey Kurtzman, Virginia Christy Lamothe, Honey Meconi, Sara Pecknold, Jonas Pfohl, Pablo L. Rodríguez, Steven Saunders, Herbert Seifert, Louise K. Stein, and Andrew H. Weaver.
In: The 1720 Imperial Circumcision Celebrations in Istanbul
In: The 1720 Imperial Circumcision Celebrations in Istanbul
In: The 1720 Imperial Circumcision Celebrations in Istanbul
In: The 1720 Imperial Circumcision Celebrations in Istanbul
In: The 1720 Imperial Circumcision Celebrations in Istanbul

Abstract

This essay considers the contrasting circumstances and perspectives on music making in New Spain (colonial Mexico) from the time of Charles V into the seventeenth century, highlighting the fragmentary nature of the evidence, its inextricable connection to the ritual of the Catholic Church, and the role of the religious orders. It questions the commonplace narrative of the magical power of European music among indigenous populations, an assertion made by period missionaries themselves, and looks into musical practices related to those in the European Low Countries. It also underscores the agency of individual musicians in a colonial musical environment and suggests that the surviving music repertoires primarily underscore the Tridentine Catholicism associated with King Philip II and his successors.

In: A Companion to Music at the Habsburg Courts in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

Abstract

Instrumental music fulfilled significant roles throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in both the courts and cities of Central Europe, where it formed the sonic foundation for many musical functions and entertainments, especially the church services, balls, concerts, and table music that refreshed both body and spirit. This essay offers a survey of the genres and functions of instrumental music at the Central European Habsburg courts, including such topics as the varieties of dance music, instrumental music as recreation for Habsburg family members, changing musical styles, and the various contexts in which instrumental music was heard, including church services, weddings, banquets, academies, bathhouses, carnival celebrations, and the theatre.

In: A Companion to Music at the Habsburg Courts in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
Author: Jonas Pfohl

Abstract

The practice of music at the imperial Habsburg courts of the sixteenth century has been a subject of musicological scholarship since the second half of the nineteenth century. This chapter provides an overview of different areas of musical practice in the households of Emperors Ferdinand I, Maximilian II, Rudolph II, and Matthias. An outline of the development of the institution and its organizational structure is provided, using the court chapel of Ferdinand I as a case study, before discussing the changes and continuities in the musical personnel as a consequence of changes in government. Leading composers and performers are also discussed, including the compositional output by such Habsburg court musicians as Arnold von Bruck, Pieter Maessins, Jacobus Vaet, Philippe de Monte, Jacob Regnart, Carl Luython, and Lambert de Sayve. In addition to discussions of the institutional musical practice within the court chapel, a brief overview of the practice of instrumental and chamber music is also provided.

In: A Companion to Music at the Habsburg Courts in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries