Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 458 items for :

  • Criticism & Theory x
  • Literary Relations x
Clear All
Author: Aurélien Lorig
Dans Le retentissant destin de Georges Darien à la Belle Époque, Aurélien Lorig s’intéresse à la vie et à l’œuvre d’un écrivain réfractaire peu connu. Avant d’être Darien, celui qui a pour patronyme Adrien est communément décrit comme un anarchiste et un marginal. En réalité, c’est un homme de lettres passionnant. L’ouvrage retrace le parcours d’un auteur plein de paradoxes, mais toujours fidèle à ses convictions individualistes. Malgré l’hostilité de ses contemporains, Darien croit au pouvoir des mots et pratique une écriture assassine où éthique comme esthétique replacent indéniablement l’écrivain dans le jeu fin-de-siècle des héritages et des lignages. De manière convaincante, Aurélien Lorig nous fait redécouvrir l’œuvre de Darien, laquelle pourrait inspirer les combats individuels, collectifs et sociaux d’aujourd’hui.

In Le retentissant destin de Georges Darien à la Belle Époque, Aurélien Lorig studies the life and the work of a little known, refractory author. Before he was Darien, the writer whose real surname was Adrien, is usually described as an anarchist, and an outcast. He actually was a fascinating man of letters. This essay recounts the journey of an author who, in spite of his numerous paradoxes, has always been true to his individualist values. In spite of his contemporaries' hostility, Darien believed in the power of words, and he practiced a murderous writing, in which ethics and aesthetics undeniably place the writer in the fin-de-siècle legacy and lineage game. Convincingly, Aurélien Lorig helps us to rediscover Darien's work, which could inspire us for individual, collective, and social nowadays struggles.
The essays in Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century straddle the disciplines of Joyce studies, translation studies, and translation theory. The newest scholarly developments in these fields are well reflected in recent retranslations of Joyce’s works into Italian, Portuguese, French, Hungarian, Dutch, Turkish, German, South Slavic, and many other languages. Joyce critics and Joyce translators offer multi-angled critical attention to the issues of translation and retranslation, enhanced by their diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds and innovative methodologies. Because retranslations of Joyce have also exerted significant influence on target language cultures, students and readers of Joyce and, more broadly, of modernist and world literature, will find this book highly relevant to their appreciation of literature in translation.
Joyce’s art is an art of idiosyncratic transformation, revision and recycling. More specifically, the work of his art lies in the act of creative transformation: the art of the paste that echoes Ezra Pound’s urge to make it new. The essays in this volume examine various modalities of the Joycean aesthetic metamorphosis: be it through the prism of Joyce engaging with other arts and artists, or through the prism of other arts and artists engaging with the Joycean aftermath. We have chosen the essays that best show the range of Joycean engagement with multiple artistic domains in a variety of media. Joyce’s art is multiform and protean: influenced by many, it influences many others.
Author: Ilaria Natali

Abstract

This chapter analyses and compares different Italian translations of Pomes Penyeach by detailing some specific translation issues cast in broader theoretical questions. If every translation is only partial by nature, this feature seems to be somehow exasperated in the case of Joyce’s poems. The numerous obscurities and ambiguities in the original texts open the way to radically different interpretations that coexist and complement each other. Translators keep discovering and exploring new meanings, apparently without exhausting the potential of the source text. The Italian versions of Pomes Penyeach change according to transformations in the target cultural context. However, the original texts present additional and less conventional problems of durability due to the multiple attempts to re-define the Joycean corpus over the years. This is the case with the controversial publication of the collection Finn’s Hotel in 2013, containing two prose fragments that include and frame the lines of “Tutto è sciolto” and “Nightpiece.” Regardless of whether Joyce considered the pieces in Finn’s Hotel as independent works or early drafts for Finnegans Wake, a doubt is cast on the status of the two poems, which could now be read – and translated – according to new criteria.

In: Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century

Abstract

In this chapter, two Italian translators of Finnegans Wake present a humorous, Wake-inflected “Ithaca”-like duologue, raising and responding to questions of translation concerning the Wake.

In: Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century
Author: Sam Slote

Abstract

This chapter takes as its premise that once a text is translated, it is exponentially retranslatable and partakes in “the problem of textual transmission in general.” Slote centres his discussion on the issues of translatorial multiplicity, departing from a critical rereading of Derrida’s “Ulysses Gramophone.” He examines textual elements of Ulysses – the dot and the end of “Ithaca” and the instances of Joyce’s non-existent yeses that nevertheless appear in the French Ulysse, to be theorized by Derrida; Slote concludes that translation fictionalises a text by misrepresenting and falsifying the original.

In: Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century

Abstract

In 2016, a new Dutch translation of Joyce’s Dubliners appeared, Dublinezen. The translators, having had the experience of translating the entire corpus of Joyce’s published works, from Finnegans Wake (2002) up to the poems, the play and the essays (collected in Varia, 2018), explain how their translational choices were influenced by all kinds of different scholarship, old and recent, as well as recourse to the earlier versions as printed in the James Joyce Archive, if only for a better insight in the developing stylistics of Joyce’s prose. They stress the importance of flinging wide the nets of research and curiosity, and among the contributors to their translation appear names such as Harald Beck, Vincent Deane, Robert Scholes, Hans Walter Gabler, Danis Rose, John O’Hanlon, Elizabeth M. Bonapfel, and countless dictionary and internet sources. Their tale is also a cautionary one, about the politics of retranslation, with at least one clear-cut moral: never agree to revise an existing translation.

In: Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century
Author: David Vichnar

Abstract

In 2012, on the 90th anniversary of its publication by Sylvia Beach, the appropriately named Argo Press – a prominent publisher of world fiction – republished Aloys Skoumal’s translation of James Joyce’s Ulysses (Odysseus in Czech). Published in 1976 by Odeon and accompanied by his afterword and annotations, Skoumal’s lifelong work is the crowning achievement of a fruitful career. Skoumal translated not only Dubliners and A Portrait, but also e.g. Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, Sterne’s Tristram Shandy, and Carroll’s Alice books. Skoumal’s Odysseus’ faithful rendering of the many obscurities of the original’s labyrinthine intentions continues to impress. Still, in 2012, it was felt that “over the years Skoumal’s freeway has shown a few potholes in need of mending,” as Martin Pokorný, the translation editor, has put it.

In: Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century
Author: Rareș Moldovan

Abstract

When in 1984 the first Romanian translation of Ulysses – by noted poet and translator Mircea Ivănescu – was published, it was an epochal achievement. Hailed for its literary and poetic quality as well as for its technical prowess, the translation became a gold standard in Romanian literary culture. The aura endures, deservedly for the most part, although the translation itself has only sporadically been subjected to close investigation. This chapter examines parts of “Calypso” and “Oxen of the Sun” from the author’s/(re)translator’s perspective, with a view towards illuminating some of the micro-processes that can make or break a translation, while offering this translator’s solutions as well.

In: Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century

Abstract

Immanent polyglossia in Ulysses poses challenges to translators. This chapter raises the question about the retranslations of Ulysses into South Slavic languages – Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Bulgarian and Slovenian – by analysing how translators approach the elements of those languages present in Joyce’s text. Taking a phrase from the “Cyclops” episode as a starting point, this chapter delineates the main characteristics of the process of translavication, that is, re-rendering or retranslating into South Slavic languages of the Slavic-inflected terms used by Joyce. Aspects of translation history and cultural connections between Joyce’s text and the South Slavic languages come to the forefront as the paradigm of modernization of the 20th century novel and they highlight the centrality of translations and retranslations of Ulysses in this process.

In: Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century