In Anatolian Verbal Stem Formation, David Sasseville offers an extensive classification of the Luwian, Lycian and Lydian verbal stem classes. This serves as a basis for reconstructing the Proto-Luwic stage and subsequent comparison with Hittite, providing new insights into the Proto-Anatolian verbal system and by extension into the reconstruction of Proto-Indo-European.
Besides its contribution to the study of verbal morphology, the present book also provides significant insights into the philology of the Anatolian languages. The detailed analyses of the synchronic data, including a philological survey of verbal forms and paradigms for the individual stem classes, enhance our understanding of Luwian, Lycian and Lydian and thereby benefit the fields of Hittitology and other studies on the Classical period in Asia Minor.
Author: Kaira Boddy
With The Composition and Tradition of Erimḫuš Kaira Boddy offers the first comprehensive study of the lexical list Erimḫuš. Boddy gives a detailed analysis of its structure and the ways in which the text and its role in scribal scholarship changed over time. Erimḫuš was highly valued by the Assyrian and Babylonian scholars of the first millennium BCE and several centuries earlier even caught the interest of the Hittites, who had their own ingenious ways of interpreting and using the material. Originally a bilingual list collecting groups of Akkadian words and their Sumerian equivalents, Erimḫuš took on a radically different character in Ḫattuša.
Placenames of the Eastern Desert, Red Sea, and South Sinai in Egyptian Documents from the Early Dynastic until the End of the New Kingdom
Author: Julien Cooper
In Toponymy on the Periphery, Julien Charles Cooper conducts a study of the rich geographies preserved in Egyptian texts relating to the desert regions east of Egypt. These regions, filled with mines, quarries, nomadic camps, and harbours are often considered as an unimportant hinterland of the Egyptian state, but this work reveals the wide explorations and awareness Egyptians had of the Red Sea and its adjacent deserts, from the Sinai in the north to Punt in the south. The book attempts to locate many of the placenames present in Egyptian texts and analyse their etymology in light of Egyptian linguistics and the various foreign languages spoken in the adjacent deserts and distant shores of the Red Sea.
In: Toponymy on the Periphery
In: Toponymy on the Periphery
In: Toponymy on the Periphery
In: Toponymy on the Periphery
In: Toponymy on the Periphery
In: Toponymy on the Periphery
In: Toponymy on the Periphery