Merchants and Missionaries in 16th and 17th Century Japan
Author: Mihoko Oka
This book attempts to depict certain aspects of the Portuguese trade in East Asia in the 16th and 17th centuries by analyzing the activities of the merchants and Christian missionaries involved. It also discusses the response of the Japanese regime in handling the systemic changes that took place in the Asian seas. Consequently, it explains how Jesuit missionaries forged close ties with local merchants from the start of their activities in East Asian waters, and there is no doubt that the propagation of Christianity in Japan was a result of their cooperation. The author of this book attempted to combine the essence of previous studies by Japanese and western scholars and added several new findings from analyses of original Japanese and European language documents.
In Assessing the Landscape of Taiwan and Korean Studies in Comparison, the chapters offer a reflection on the state of the field of Taiwan and Korea Studies. For the editors, the volume’s purpose was to identify not just their similarities, but also a reflection on their differences. Both have national identities formed in a colonial period. The surrender of Japan in 1945 ignited the light of independence for Korea, but this would be ideologically split within five years. For Taiwan, that end forced it into a born-again form of nationalism with the arrival of the Chinese Nationalists.

Taiwan and South Korea’s economic development illustrate a progressive transition and key to understanding this is the relationship between ‘modernization’ and ‘democracy’. By looking at Korea and Taiwan, the chapters in the volume broaden an understanding of the interconnectivity of the region.
Professor Alexander V. Vovin’s fruitful research has brought incomparable results to the fields of Asian linguistics and philology throughout the past four decades. In this volume, presented in honour of Professor Vovin’s 60th birthday, twenty-two authors present new research regarding Japanese, Korean, Turkish, Khitan, Yakut, Mongolian, Chinese, Hachijō, Ikema Miyakoan, Ainu, Okinawan, Nivkh, Eskimo-Aleut and other languages. The chapters are both a tribute to his research and a summary of the latest developments in the field.
Volume Editor: Yunxiang Yan
Chinese Families Upside Down offers the first systematic account of how intergenerational dependence is redefining the Chinese family. The authors make a collective effort to go beyond the conventional model of filial piety to explore the rich, nuanced, and often unexpected new intergenerational dynamics. Supported by ethnographic findings from the latest field research, novel interpretations of neo-familism address critical issues from fresh perspectives, such as the ambivalence in grandparenting, the conflicts between individual and family interests, the remaking of the moral self in the face of family crises, and the decisive influence of the Chinese state on family change. The book is an essential read for scholars and students of China studies in particular and for those who are interested in the present-day family and kinship in general.
Women, Media, and Colonial Modernity in the Interwar Years
Author: Sumei Wang
The East Asian Modern Girl reports the long-neglected experiences of modern women in East Asia during the interwar period. The edited volume includes original studies on the modern girl in Taiwan, Korea, Manchuria, Japan, Shanghai, and Hong Kong, which reveal differentiated forms of colonial modernity, influences of global media and the struggles of women at the time. The advent of the East Asian modern girl is particularly meaningful for it signifies a separation from traditional Confucian influences and progression toward global media and capitalism, which involves high political and economic tension between the East and West. This book presents geo-historical investigations on the multi-force triggered phenomenon and how it eventually contributed to greater post-war transformations.

Abstract

On 1 April 2013, the Law of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea on Space Exploration was enacted and promulgated by the Supreme People’s Assembly. The law is the first national legislation governing national space activities and it forms the basic law in the field of national space exploration. The enactment of this law provides a domestic legal guarantee for national space activities to the advantage of the country’s national economy and people’s livelihoods in conformity with the requirements of international space-related treaties. The paper provides a summary description and analysis of the national space legislation of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea with an eye to the UN resolutions concerning national space legislation and other countries’ national space laws.

In: European Journal of East Asian Studies
Series Editors: Niki Alsford and Mark Harrison
Taiwan Studies is a growing field with increasing influence. The series, founded by J. Bruce Jacobs†, is to publish high quality research which breaks new ground and/or gives new insights to Taiwan. Monographs and edited books from all disciplines as well as cross-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary research are welcome. Comparative research where Taiwan is an important component is welcome as well. The series aims to reach academics, informed readers as well as policy makers.
Series Editors: Ross King, David Lurie, and Marion Eggert
Edited by Ross King, University of British Columbia, David Lurie, Columbia University and Marion Eggert, Ruhr-Universität Bochum
The series will be of interest to anybody interested in questions of cosmopolitan and vernacular in the Sinographic Cosmopolis—specifically, with respect to questions of language, writing and literary culture, embracing both beginnings (the origins of and early sources for writing in the sinographic sphere) and endings (the disintegration of the Sinographic Cosmopolis in places like Korea, Japan and Vietnam, and the advent of linguistic modernity throughout all of the old Sinitic sphere. In addition, the series will feature comparative research on interactions and synergies in language, writing and literary culture in the Sinographic Cosmopolis over nearly two millennia, as well as studies of the 'sinographic hangover' in modern East Asia-critical and comparative assessments of the social and cultural history of language and writing and linguistic thought in modern and premodern East Asia.
Series Editors: M. Antoni J. Ucerler SJ and Wu Xiaoxin
Edited by M. Antoni J. Ucerler, Ricci Institute for Chinese-Western Cultural History, University of San Francisco, S.J. and Wu Xiaoxin, Ricci Institute for Chinese-Western Cultural History, University of San Francisco The primary focus of this new peer-reviewed monograph series will be the study of Christianity in East Asia. It will reflect “local” (i.e. Chinese, Japanese and Korean) themes as well as comparative perspectives that explore the historical, cultural, and religious connections that mark the interactions between these countries. Subject matter may include but is not limited to: church history, cultural anthropology, historical linguistics, history of science and medicine, global history, and comparative studies. The series will also include critical studies of primary sources related to the history of Christianity in East Asia and/or critical translations of those sources, with accompanying commentary and critical apparatus. Influential works in the field hitherto published only in Japanese, Chinese, or Korean respectively will be carefully selected, translated into English, and made available to an international audience with the aim of promoting scholarly dialogue beyond local linguistic constituencies.

The Editors welcome inquiries from prospective authors. For more information concerning the series and the manuscript submission process, please contact Stephen Ford, Editorial Assistant, at riccimonographs@usfca.edu.
In: The Language of the Old-Okinawan Omoro Sōshi