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Coinage and Money in Medieval Greece 1200-1430, by Julian Baker, is a monetary history of medieval Thessaly, mainland Greece and the Peloponnese, Epiros, and adjacent islands. The central focus of the book is the record of coin finds and coin types, which this study presents in a fully developed political, socio-economic, military, and archaeological/topographical context.
In medieval Greece there is a strong symbiosis between monetary and historical developments. The general level of documentation is also vastly superior to the preceding middle Byzantine period. Volume Two presents and evaluates these data. Volume One offers analyses on major historical themes, which demonstrate that the monetary sources can hold narratives in their own rights, complementing and at times contradicting the established accounts.
Machiavelli’s Art of War and the Fortune of the Militia in Sixteenth-Century Florence and Europe
How did the evolution of new gunpowder weapons change the nature, structure and composition of the Florentine militias during the first decades of the sixteenth century? Via an examination of little-known and unpublished sources, this book provides a comparative exploration of two Florentine republican experiments with a peasant militia: one promoted and created by Niccolò Machiavelli (1506-12) and a later one (1527-30). Using this comparison as the basis for a new reading of Machiavelli’s Art of War (which drew on the author's experience with the militia), the book then investigates the relationship between the circulation and reception of Machiavelli’s influential work, changing conceptions of militia, and the formation of new cultures of warfare in Europe in the sixteenth century.
Editor: Gábor Kármán
Tributaries and Peripheries of the Ottoman Empire offers twelve studies on the relationship between Ottoman tributaries with each other in the imperial framework, as well as with neighboring border provinces of the empire’s core territories from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. A variety of surveys related to the Cossack Ukraine, the Crimean Khanate, Dagestan, Moldavia, Ragusa, Transylvania, Upper Hungary and Wallachia allow the reader to see hitherto less known subtleties of the Ottoman administration’s hierarchic structures and the liberties and restrictions of the office-holders’ power. They also shed light upon the strategies of coalition-building among the elites of the tributaries as well as the core provinces of the border zones, which determined their cooperation, but also the competition between them.

Contributors include: János B. Szabó, Ovidiu Cristea, Tetiana Grygorieva, Klára Jakó, Gábor Kármán, Dariusz Kołodziejczyk, Natalia Królikowska-Jedlińska, Erica Mezzoli, Viorel Panaite, Radu G. Păun, Ruža Radoš Ćurić, Balázs Sudár, Michał Wasiucionek.
The Portrayal of Destruction and Mass Violence
Editors: Frank Jacob and Mor Presiado
The present volume provides a critical insight into the relationship of art and war. It shows how artists perceive war and how they depict it, to warn the spectator but to cure their own trauma at the same time.
War causes destruction, loss, and trauma. Many artists have used their art to express feelings and memories related to these losses and their own traumatic experiences. The artwork that came into existence due to such processes reflects on events of our past, but should be considered a warning at the same time. To deal with human suffering means to fully engage with the artist remains of human war experiences. The present volume aims to provide a first critical insight into the relationship between art and war, showing how artists dealt with human losses, destruction, and personal trauma.
Rethinking Resilience
The First World War and Health: Rethinking Resilience considers how the First World War (1914-1918) affected mental and physical health, its treatment, and how the victims – not only soldiers and sailors, but also medics, and even society as a whole - tried to cope with the wounds sustained. The volume, which contains over twenty articles divided into four sections (military, personal, medical, and societal resilience), therefore aims to broaden the scope of resilience: resilience is more than the personal ability to cope with hardship; if society as a whole cannot cope with, or even obstructs, personal recovery, resilience is difficult to achieve.

Contributors are Carol Acton, Julie Anderson, Leo van Bergen, Ana Carden-Coyne, Cédric Cotter, Dominiek Dendooven, Christine van Everbroeck, Daniel Flecknoe, Christine E. Hallett, Hans-Georg Hofer, Edgar Jones, Wim Klinkert, Harold Kudler, Alexander McFarlane, Johan Meire, Heather Perry, Jane Potter, Fiona Reid, Jeffrey R. Reznick, Stephen Snelders, Hanneke Takken, Pieter Trogh, and Eric Vermetten.
This volume provides a series of new perspectives on the political, military, and religious history of the reign of Fernando III, king of Castile-León, from 1217-1252. The essays collected here address the conquest of al-Andalus and the policies of Fernando III, Christian-Muslim relations in the Peninsula, the creation and curation of royal networks of power, the role of women at the Castilian court, and the impact of religious change in Castile-León. Assembling an international group of eleven leading scholars on this period of Iberian history, this volume combines military and religious history with a variety of novel approaches and methodologies to ask new and exciting questions about the reign of Fernando III and his place in medieval European history.
Contributors are Martín Alvira, Carlos de Ayala Martínez, Janna Bianchini, Bárbara Boloix-Gallardo, Cristina Catalina, Francisco García Fitz, Francisco García-Serrano, Edward L. Holt, Kyle C. Lincoln, Miriam Shadis, and Teresa Witcombe.
Aragon vs. Castile and the War of the Two Pedros
In Conflict in Fourteenth-Century Iberia, Kagay and Villalon trace the complicated economic military, political, and social background of the relationship of Iberia’s two greatest Christian states of the fourteenth century, Castile and the Crown of Aragon and their rulers, Pedro I (r. 1350-1366/69) and Pere III (r. 1336-1387). Besides chapters discussing the War of the Two Pedros (1356-1366) and the Castilian Civil War (1366-1369), the authors provide extended treatments of the strategical and tactical elements of the conflicts, the parliamentary, diplomatic, and governmental developments that occurred because of the conflicts as well as their social and political aftermaths. This work, along with authors’ earlier book on the battle of Nájera (1367) provides a much-needed review of Iberia’s violent fourteenth century.
L’œuvre d’un historien guinéen à l’époque coloniale / The Work of a Guinean Historian during the Colonial Period
Essai d’histoire locale fut écrit par un acteur-clé de l’historiographie de l’Afrique de l’Ouest pourtant encore méconnu: Djiguiba Camara. Rédigé en 1955, ce texte est centré sur l’histoire du Nord-Est de la Guinée, avec une attention particulière portée sur l’empire de Samori Touré et la résistance anticoloniale.
Ce texte, Essai d’histoire locale, illustre la fabrique de l’histoire locale et coloniale par un intermédiaire colonial guinéen et un intellectuel, à partir du point de vue spécifique de la famille Camara, qui fut engagée dans les armées de Samori. Ce texte n’a été connu que parce qu’il est devenu l’une des sources majeures de l’historien français Yves Person pour sa monumentale thèse Samori, Une Révolution Dyula (1968-1975). Avec cette édition annotée d’une source primaire, “Essai d’histoire locale” de Djiguiba Camara devient enfin accessible à un lectorat plus vaste. Elara Bertho et Marie Rodet ont démontré grâce à cette publication que Essai d’histoire locale est une source essentielle pour la compréhension de l’histoire de la Guinée ainsi que de la fabrique de l’historiographie, en particulier du travail d’Yves Person.

Although a key figure in West African historiography, Djiguiba Camara from Damaro has remained almost completely unknown. He wrote Essay on Local History over many years but finally finished it in 1955. His focus was the history of North-Eastern Guinea with an emphasis on the Empire of Samori Touré and anticolonial resistance.
Everywhere in Essay on Local History we can see not only the highly developed craft of the local and colonial historical writing of a Guinean colonial intermediary and scholar, but the view he gave is from the particular perspective of the Camara family, who had served in Samori’s armies. Djiguiba Camara’s own work had been known only by reputation as a source for the monumental thee-volume Samori – Une Révolution Dyula (1968-1975) by the French historian Yves Person. Now however, in this fully annotated text edition, Djiguiba Camara’s Essai d’histoire locale becomes available to a wider audience for the first time. Elara Bertho and Marie Rodet have demonstrated through this publication that Essay on Local History is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand both the history of Guinea and more especially Yves Person’s modus operandi.

From 1914 to 1917, in severe weather conditions on the icy Baltic Sea, Russian and British submariners contested control of the sea lanes with the German Imperial Navy. Their accomplishments were largely forgotten after the war’s end. However, the Russo-British Baltic Submarine Flotilla played an important role in the war at sea in the First World War. Most significantly, in 1915 the Flotilla wreaked havoc on German naval planning and nearly cut Germany’s critical iron ore imports from Sweden. The results would lead to a strategic crisis in the German Imperial Admiralty Staff and delay Germany’s attempt to break the British blockade until 1916. Here, the significance of the Russo-British Baltic Submarine Flotilla to the broader strategy of the First World War – and its later impact on strategy in the Second World War – is re-examined.

In: International Journal of Military History and Historiography

The Cold War versions – ‘AirLand Battle’, ‘AirLand Battle 2000’, and ‘Follow-On Forces Attack’ – of the ‘Deep Battle’ concepts developed by Germany and the Soviet Union in the 1920s and 1930s, caused the flare-up of rare criticism within the community of defence experts and, in particular, friction between the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Army and, on a broader spectrum, between the usa and its European allies. Thanks to recently declassified documents, we can now also add the cia to the chorus of critical voices; the cia’s scepticism provoked serious disagreements with General Rogers, the then Supreme Allied Commander for Europe. The likely inadequacies of the various forms of Deep Battle for fighting the Soviet threat, along with the total or partial absence of external factors that normally drive the changing of military doctrines, suggest the existence of more prosaic, parochial reasons for their ideation and adoption.

In: International Journal of Military History and Historiography