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The Roots and Reception of the Rosicrucian Call for General Reform
Author: Lyke de Vries
The early seventeenth century witnessed a dramatic upsurge of proposals for change, in particular in religion, politics, and knowledge. In Reformation, Revolution, Renovation, Lyke de Vries offers an account of the Rosicrucian manifestos in this transformative context. She focuses on their call for a general reformation and traces it to medieval and early modern predecessors. The manifestos, commonly portrayed as either Lutheran or esoteric, are here analysed as revolutionary mission statements, which challenged established religious and academic authorities, drawing on various heterodox notions and radical traditions. Emphasising the universal character of these manifestos in the first book-length study of the topic, Lyke de Vries convincingly shows how their authors channeled early modern sentiments into a message of universal change, which provoked numerous strong responses from early modern readers.
Mining the rich documentary sources housed in Tuscan archives and taking advantage of the breadth and depth of scholarship produced in recent years, the seventeen essays in this Companion to Cosimo I de' Medici provide a fresh and systematic overview of the life and career of the first Grand Duke of Tuscany, with special emphasis on Cosimo I's education and intellectual interests, cultural policies, political vision, institutional reforms, diplomatic relations, religious beliefs, military entrepreneurship, and dynastic concerns.

Contributors: Maurizio Arfaioli, Alessio Assonitis, Nicholas Scott Baker, Sheila Barker, Stefano Calonaci, Brendan Dooley, Daniele Edigati, Sheila ffolliott, Catherine Fletcher, Andrea Gáldy, Fernando Loffredo, Piergabriele Mancuso, Jessica Maratsos, Carmen Menchini, Oscar Schiavone, Marcello Simonetta, and Henk Th. van Veen.
Recent research has established the continued importance of engagement with the classical tradition to the formation of scholarly, philosophical, theological, and scientific knowledge well into the eighteenth century. The Worlds of Knowledge and the Classical Tradition in the Early Modern Age is the first attempt to adopt a comparative approach to this phenomenon. An international team of scholars explores the differences and similarities – across time and place – in how the study and use of ancient texts and ideas shaped a wide range of fields: nascent classics, sexuality, chronology, metrology, the study of the soul, medicine, the history of Judaeo-Christian interaction, and biblical criticism. By adopting a comparative approach, this volume brings out some of the most important factors in explaining the contours of early modern intellectual life.
The ingenious and ambitious Campani brothers—Matteo, Pier Tommaso, and Giuseppe—were at the core of thriving activity of technological and scientific innovation that involved popes, the Sun King, and other rulers of baroque Europe. Especially Giuseppe’s outstanding production of innovating clocks, telescopes, and microscopes, attracted the attention of the most important scientific characters and experimental academies of the time. This posthumous book by Silvio Bedini is the result of a fifty-year-long study that will serve not just as a reference work for scholars interested in seventeenth-century clockmaking, practical optics, astronomy, and science and technology in general, but it also will provide you with unique insights into the scientific and technological landscape of baroque Rome and its links to a broader European scene. The author's narrative style and the many illustrations which accompany the story, make this book also for non-specialists an enjoyable read.
Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy and Science is a book series to be dedicated totally to the investigation of scientific thought between 1200 and 1700, the period that saw the birth of modern scientific method and the origins of the scientific world view. It covers not only the Aristotelian paradigm of scholastic natural philosophy, but also rivalling Renaissance and seventeenth-century conceptions of physics.
A broad-based and distinguished panel of editors and international advisors has made a careful selection of the best new research emerging in a vibrant field examining this formative period of European scientific thought. Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy and Science contains contributions from an international cast of experienced and promising scholars and looks for the highest standards of scholarship in work that is thought-provoking, insightful, and at the forefront of contemporary discussion.
Its editorial stance is broad, aiming not only to embrace all the main aspects of study but to approach them from a variety of angles and to foster new methodological ideas. Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy and Science thus includes commented editions of crucial (medieval) texts, monographs of important thinkers, and diachronic analyses of particular themes. Accessible, attractively written articles and monographs will open up the latest trends and developments in the field to a wide range of teachers and students in further and higher education.

Sponsored by the prestigious Center for Medieval and Renaissance Natural Philosophy at the Radboud University (Nijmegen) Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy and Science is essential reading for anyone studying intellectual history, the history of science, and the history of philosophy.

Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy and Science is a continuation of Medieval and Early Modern Science (MEMS).

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson or to one of the series editors: C.H. Lüthy, Radboud University, Nijmegen, or P.J.J.M. Bakker, Radboud University, Nijmegen.
For information on how to submit a book proposal, please consult the Brill Author Guide.
The Intersection of Art, Science, and Nature in Ancient Literature and its Renaissance Reception
Editor: Guy Hedreen
The interplay between nature, science, and art in antiquity and the early modern period differs significantly from late modern expectations. In this book scholars from ancient studies as well as early modern studies, art history, literary criticism, philosophy, and the history of science, explore that interplay in several influential ancient texts and their reception in the Renaissance. The Natural History of Pliny, De Architectura of Vitruvius, De Rerum Natura of Lucretius, Automata of Hero, and Timaios of Plato among other texts reveal how fields of inquiry now considered distinct were originally understood as closely interrelated. In our choice of texts, we focus on materialistic theories of nature, knowledge, and art that remain underappreciated in ancient and early modern studies even today.
Gregorio a San Vicente and the Flemish Jesuit Mathematics School
Author: Ad J. Meskens
In Between Tradition and Innovation, Ad Meskens traces the profound influence of a group of Flemish Jesuits on the course of mathematics in the seventeenth century. Using manuscript evidence, this book argues that one of the Flemish mathematics school’s professors, Gregorio a San Vicente (1584–1667), had developed a logically sound integration method more than a decade before the Italian mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri. Although San Vincente’s superiors refused to grant him permission to publish his results, his methods went on to influence numerous other mathematicians through his students, many of whom became famous mathematicians in their own right. By carefully tracing their careers and outlining their biographies, Meskens convincingly shows that they made a number of ground-breaking contributions to fields ranging from mathematics and mechanics to optics and architecture.
Giovanni Pico della Mirandola’s Disputationes adversus astrologiam divinatricem and Its Reception
Author: Ovanes Akopyan
In Debating the Stars, Ovanes Akopyan sheds new light on the astrological controversies that arose in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries after the publication of Giovanni Pico della Mirandola’s Disputationes adversus astrologiam divinatricem (1496). This treatise has often been held responsible for a contemporary reassessment of the status of astrology, a discipline that attracted widespread fascination in the Renaissance. Akopyan’s reconstruction of the development of Pico’s views demonstrates that the Disputationes was a continuation of rather than a drastic rupture with the rest of his legacy. By investigating the philosophical and humanist foundations for Pico’s attack on astrological predictions, Akopyan challenges the popular assumption that the treatise was written under Girolamo Savonarola’s spell. He shows instead how it was appropriated ideologically by pro-Savonarolan circles after Pico’s death.
This book also offers a comprehensive study of the immediate reception of the Disputationes across Italy and Europe and reveals that the debates initiated by Pico’s intervention pervaded all of the European intellectual oikumene.
Early Modern Universities: Networks of Higher Education publishes twenty essays on early modern institutional academic networks and the history of the book. The case studies examine universities, schools, and academies across a wide geographical range throughout Europe, and in Central America. The volume suggests pathways for future research into institutional hierarchies, cultural ties, and how networks of policy makers were embedded in complex scholarly and scientific developments. Topics include institutions and political entanglements; locality and mobility, especially the movement of scholars and scholarship between institutions; communication, collaboration, and the circulation of academic knowledge. The essays use studies of print and book cultures to provide insights into cooperative interregional markets, travel and trade.

Contributors: Laurence Brockliss, Liam Chambers, Liam Chambers, Peter Davidson, Mordechai Feingold, Alette Fleischer, Willem Frijhoff, Anja- Silvia Goeing, Martina Hacke, Michael Hunter, Urs B. Leu, David A. Lines, Ian Maclean, Thomas O’Connor, Glyn Parry, Yarí Pérez Marín, Elizabeth Sandis, Andreas Sohn, Jane Stevenson, Iolanda Ventura, and Benjamin Wardhaugh.
Volume Editor: Patrick J. Boner
The supernova of 1604 marks a major turning point in the cosmological crisis of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Capturing the eyes and imagination of Europe, it ignited an explosion of ideas that forever changed the face of science. Variously interpreted as a comet or star, the new luminary brought together a broad network of scholars who debated the nature of the novelty and its origins in the universe. At the heart of the interdisciplinary discourse was Johannes Kepler, whose book On the New Star (1606) assessed the many disputes of the day. Beginning with several studies about Kepler’s book, the authors of the present volume explore the place of Kepler and the ‘new star’ in early modern culture and religion, and how contemporary debate shaped the course of science down to the present day.

Contributors are: (1) Dario Tessicini, (2) Christopher M. Graney, (3) Javier Luna, (4) Patrick J. Boner, (5) Jonathan Regier, (6) Aviva Rothman, (7) Miguel Á. Granada, (8) Pietro Daniel Omodeo, (9) Matteo Cosci, and (10) William P. Blair.