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Abstract

Under the forms listed for the lemma Old High German snecko m. ‚snail‘ also a variant ‹ slecco › is mentioned. The ‑l‑ must then be the result either of a scribal error, a dissimilation or an assimilation. However, there is in Dutch a word for snail that also shows ‑l‑, Middle Dutch slecke (f.). It is argued here that Old High German slecko is a separate lemma that corresponds to Middle Dutch slecke.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik

Abstract

In the dictionaries of Old High German an entry snichezzunga f. ‘sob’ is listed. It is shown here that the manuscript reading rather points to sichizunga that has a parallel in OE sicettung f. ‘sigh, sob’ and is a derivation from the root PGmc. *sei̯ke/a- ‘to sigh, sob’. In a supplement, improved readings of five glosses in the manuscript Paris, BnF lat. 9344, are given, as well as an edition of four new glosses and some reflections on a still unexplained marginal entry.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik

Abstract

Horribile dictu, the twenty-first century is witnessing a steady decline of democracy and the rise of autocratic, self-aggrandizing rulers in many countries across the world. How long will they stay in power, however? Already since the high Middle Ages, numerous poets across Europe explored the topic of the ‘emperor in misery,’ in which an angel takes on the appearance of the emperor, which forces the latter to go through a long period of extreme suffering, being denied all respect, rejected, beaten, imprisoned, suffering from hunger and cold. Eventually, the poor emperor learns to accept his destiny, repents his previous hubris, confesses his sins, and suddenly realizes that his doppelgänger is actually an angel sent from God to teach him a lesson. Once this transformation in his soul has happened, the angel explains the entire situation, warns the emperor never to commit his sins again, and disappears. Of course, it is doubtful whether these narratives might have ever had a direct impact on the political situation, but the warning for evil rulers resonated throughout the centuries and found a remarkable continuation in one of the novellas of the Baltic-German author Werner Bergengruen (1946).

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: John M. Jeep

Abstract

The recently published compendium of 175 German verse tales from the 13th–15th century (Deutsche Versnovellistik des 13. bis 15. Jahrhunderts) includes never-before-published material in critical edition, so that a survey of the alliterating word-pairs within this arguably hard to define genre seems desirable. Some 380 pairs are collected and analysed within the context of each tale, with special attention paid to earlier transmission of the pairs or their innovative nature, respectively. Following a methodology that has been employed to cover all of Old and Early Middle High German and much of classical High German, the history of this durable rhetorical device is extended well into the late medieval era. Further surveys will help to fill in remaining gaps in coverage of the history of the alliterating word-pair in German.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik