Abstract

The Neotropical harpactorine assassin bug genus Acanthischium (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Harpactorini) includes four valid species: Acanthischium maculatum (with ten color varieties proposed by Stål []), Acanthischium haglundi , Acanthischium superbum , and Acanthischium invium . A taxonomic revision and a morphological phylogenetic analysis were carried out to test species limits and to propose a hypothesis of evolutionary relationships. As a result of the phylogenetic analysis, Acanthischium is characterized on its external morphology by the elongate postocular region, posterior margin of the pronotum with spines, ventral surface of protrochanter with apical and basal protuberances, profemur wider than mesofemur, and protibia strongly curved. After the taxonomic revision we propose nine valid species, taking into consideration characters of external morphology, male and female genitalia, and color patterns: Acanthischium dimidiatum stat. rev.; Acanthischium flaviceps stat. rev.; Acanthischium haglundi ; Acanthischium kuna sp. nov. from Panama and Colombia; Acanthischium maculatum ; Acanthischium meloae sp. nov. from Suriname; Acanthischium nigrum stat. rev.; Acanthischium semiflavum stat. rev.; and Acanthischium superbum . We further synonymize A. invium with A. superbum. All but one of the species ‒ A. flaviceps ‒ were included in the phylogenetic analysis, in which Acanthischium was found to be monophyletic, with the following set of relationships: (A. haglundi + (A. nigrum +(A. dimidiatum (A. maculatum, A. semiflavum, A. kuna, A. meloae, A. superbum)))). The resulting phylogenetic pattern indicate a body color transition from drab to more vivid ones, such as orange or red. The species exhibiting red and orange colorations are found in a clade, suggesting an underlying biological phenomenon, such as wasp mimetism.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

Myceporthus (Coleoptera: Erotylidae: Tritomini) is revised. Species currently in the genus, M. pauperculus () and M. vernix (), are reviewed. Five new species are described: M. careorufus sp. nov., M. melinatrum sp. nov., M. rubeus sp. nov., M. rubicundus sp. nov., and M. rufus sp. nov., with a dichotomous key to members of the genus also provided.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
Series Editor: Ivan Löbl
The Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera comprises eight book volumes covering the about 100,000 species of Coleoptera known to occur in the Palaearctic Region. The catalogue is a collective work of about one hundred coleopterists from Europe, Japan, America and Australia.

For each species the following information is provided:
• Primary taxonomic information of all available names in the genus and species levels.
• The taxonomic information below subfamily, organized alphabetically.
• The type species of genera and subgenera, incl. synonyms.
• The area covered also includes the Arabian Peninsula, Himalayas and China.
• The distributional data of species and subspecies is given per country.
• Detailed distributional information for strict endemics is given.
• Introduced species are indicated.

Publication dates:
CPC 1 Archostemata-Myxophaga-Adephaga (2003) --> REVISED AND UPDATED EDITION published in October 2017
CPC 2 Hydrophiloidea - Staphylinoidea (2 vols) --> REVISED AND UPDATED EDITION published in August 2015
CPC 3 Scarabaeoidea, Scirtoidea, Dascilloidea, Buprestoidea and Byrrhoidea (2006) --> REVISED AND UPDATED EDITION published in June 2016
CPC 4 Elateroidea, Derodontoidea, Bostrichoidea, Lymexyloidea, Cleroidea and Cucujoidea (2007)
CPC 5 Tenebrionoidea (2008) --> REVISED AND UPDATED EDITION forthcoming in September 2020
CPC 6 Chrysomeloidea (2010) --> REVISED AND UPDATED EDITION entitled Chrysomeloidea I (Vesperidae, Disteniidae, Cerambycidae) forthcoming in Decedmber 2020 and Chrysomeloidea II (Megalopodidae, Orsodacnidae, Chrysomelidae) forthcoming in 2021/2022
CPC 7 Curculionoidea I (2011)
CPC 8 Curculionoidea II (2013)

Abstract

Holopothrips is a diverse group of thrips associated to galls in the Neotropics, with a variety of host plants and wide morphological diversity. Relationships to other Neotropical groups have been proposed, but are still untested, and the monophyly of the genus remains doubtful. Here, we perform a phylogenetic analysis of Holopothrips, based on morphological characters. A total of 87 species were included in the matrix and eight analyses were carried out, but all of them failed to recover Holopothrips as a monophyletic grouping. Bremer and Bootstrap support values were low, and the topologies varied among all analyses, with uncertain internal relations for the ingroup. These results indicate that the relationships for Holopothrips species, and the proposed related genera, are more complex than previously reported; and morphological characters may not be enough to recover the evolutionary story within this group. We also discuss the influences of different character coding, continuous characters and weighting schemes in our results.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Abstract

Antissella is a small genus of soldier flies endemic to Australia, previously thought to comprise only two described species and suspected to have a role in pollination. Six new species of Antissella are named, described and illustrated herein, and an updated identification key to all known species is provided. The new species include: Antissella alicespringsensis Lessard & Woodley sp.n., Antissella elongata Lessard & Woodley, sp.n., Antissella kalbarriensis Lessard & Woodley sp.n., Antissella nigricentralis Lessard & Woodley sp.n., Antissella ottensorum Lessard & Woodley, sp.n., and Antissella purprasina Lessard & Woodley, sp.n. A lectotype and paralectotype are also selected for Antissella quinquecella (). Eight species of Antissella are now recognised from Australia. Three of the new species are known from areas burned by the devastating 2019/2020 Australian summer bushfires. Now that they are formally named and described, the species may be recognised in future bushfire recovery monitoring programs.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
Volume Editor: Mikhail Danilevsky
The aim of Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera is to provide a tool that addresses the most urgent needs:
1) a complete list of available names of taxa occurring in the Palaearctic Region with authors and publications dates,
2) a list of references to primary publications,
3) distributions of the species and subspecies.
Thus, the Catalogue is expected to respond to questions related to biodiversity, and to increase the badly needed nomenclatural stability.
The present updated and revised Catalogue is a collective international work by 12 authors from Austria, Belgium, China, Korea, Japan and Russia. It includes about 6453 species names of 913 genera. The general structure and the taxonomic, distributional and bibliographical information of the first edition of the Catalogue are followed with minor changes.
Maria Sibylla Merian’s Caterpillar Book
Author: Kay Etheridge
The Flowering of Ecology presents an English translation of Maria Sibylla Merian’s 1679 ‘caterpillar’ book, Der Raupen wunderbare Verwandelung und sonderbare Blumen–Nahrung. Her processes in making the book and an analysis of its scientific content are presented in a historical context. Merian raised insects for five decades, recording the food plants, behavior and ecology of roughly 300 species. Her most influential invention was an 'ecological' composition in which the metamorphic cycles of insects (usually moths and butterflies) were arrayed around plants that served as food for the caterpillars. Kay Etheridge analyzes the 1679 caterpillar book from the viewpoint of a biologist, arguing that Merian’s study of insect interactions with plants, the first of its kind, was a formative contribution to natural history.

Read Kay Etheridge’s blogpost on “Art Herstory”.
In: Tijdschrift voor Entomologie

This study focuses on the Brazilian species of the genus Purenleon Stange (Neuroptera: Myrmeleontidae). A total of five species are herein reported to Brazil: Purenleon clavatus (Navás), Purenleon fernandezi Miller & Stange (first record for Brazil), Purenleon cautus (Walker) comb. n., and two new species: Purenleon limeirai sp. n. and Purenleon rafaeli sp. n. The taxonomical status of other two species was reevaluated: Formicaleo bipunctatus Navás was synonymized under P. cautus and Feinerus nebulosus Navás was revalidated and transferred to Purenleon. A key to the South American species of Purenleon is also presented.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Nine new species of the collembolan genus Salina MacGillivray from South America are described and illustrated. Two Neotropical species were recorded for the first time from Brazil: S. dedoris Mari-Mutt and S. tristani Denis. Salina was previously known to occur in three Brazilian states, and this is now updated to include 19 states with 12 recorded species. A new proposal of morphological character description and illustration, and an identification key for the celebensis group are provided. A hypothesis for the phylogenetic relationships among 34 species of Salina (about 50% of the 72 described species) allowed three main pursuits: (a) a reevaluation of Salina species groups; (b) the first explicit interpretation of how morphological characters of these springtails may have changed during the course of the diversification of the taxon; and (c) an evaluation of the historical biogeographic connections of Salina, with an emphasis on the celebensis group distribution to the New World.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution